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Popular Song and Dance 1912

This discussion on "Popular Song and Dance 1912" is in the Amusements & Diversions section; Every generation seems to have its own music and memorable dance crazes. Looks like I ...

      
   
  1. #1
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    Every generation seems to have its own music and memorable dance crazes. Looks like I will be catapulted back into my misspent youth with the jitterbug and You Ain't Nothin' But A Hound Dog. I found this link today which addresses much of the pop culture of 1912- especially amusing were the funny dances like the Lobster Rag and the Castle Walk- and we thought the Swim, Twist, frug and Mashed Potatoes were hot stuff! The first link is an absorbing account of THE dance team of the time-Irene and Vernon Castle. The second will give a good list of popular tunes-some of which we are still crooning today-had no idea Oh You Beautiful Doll was written in 1911- and then, where would we be without Irving Berlin? Got a favorite 1912 tune?
    http://www.paragonra gtime.com/castle.htm l
    http://www.paragonra gtime.com/discs.html

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    The Maxixe (pronounced "Ma-sheesh"), named for the prickly part of a cactus, was a Brazilian dance exhibited in the US in 1910. It was not introduced to Paris until 1912 at which time it became hugely popular. Edison recorded the rythmic "rumba" type tune that accompanied the Maxixe in the US in 1914.

    The Maxixe's Titanic connection is of course that it was the music which Edith Rosenbaum Russell's toy pig played when its tail was twisted. She famously soothed the frightened children in her lifeboat with the tune, playing it over and over. One wonders, however, whether the adults appreciated the monotony!

    Here it for yourself:

    http://nico.library. ucsb.edu/cylinders/C USB-CYL0023a.mov

  3. #3
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    Geoff and Cookster caught in a tango? I may have to check this one out-
    http://vintagedancers.org/newport/n_02bro.html
    Superb costume link by the way.

  4. #4
    Pat Cook
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    Slight typo there - whenever Geoff or I dance, it's a tangle, not tango.

    As ever and ever,
    Cookster

  5. #5
    Bob Cruise
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    I find the music of 1912 extremely intriguing. Coming as it does near the start of the 20th century, it sits between what we consider "classical" and "modern". So - sometimes I hear jazz, sometimes I hear strictly "old-fogey".

    As enjoyable and familiar as this music is, however, we of the 21st century must regard it in the light of its uncertain beginnings.

    Consider: although the then-newly-evolving genre of "ragtime" sounds pleasing to our ears (both in its own right - "Alexander's Ragtime Band" - and for what it portends), it is interesting to note what L. Frank Baum wrote in 1913's "The Patchwork Girl of Oz" (one of the many sequels to his hugely successful "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz"). Says one character of ragtime: "It's enough to drive a crazy lady mad."

    My favorite 1912 hit?

    "Lily of Laguna"

    This song is #21 on the CD "Titanic: Music as Heard on The Fateful Voyage" (available from Rhino Records)

    "Lily of Laguna"' is a tune of the "cakewalk" genre, the origin of which, as the American Heritage Dictionary describes, is "a promenade or walk, formerly executed as entertainment by American blacks in which those performing the most complex and unusual steps won cakes as prizes."

    Yum-yum!

    They don't write 'em like they used to!!!


  6. #6
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    Yes Shell, You caught us at our weekly Tango class, our instructor says we are doing very well - next week it's Cook's turn to lead!

    p.s. Heard from Behe last week - still as objectionable as ever I'm afraid! Even tried to suggest that pink really wasn't Cook's colour for a ball gown!

    Geoff

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    I'd go for the Turkey Trot, I was 25 before I realised that they don't still do it in discos!

    Geoff

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    They don't do it ANYWHERE !!!

    Indeed, if you do it in Utah you get strapped down on 'Ole Sparky' and they run the National Grid through you...

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    Hey Dave, Sounds like my kinda place! Wonder what they'd make of my "Dashing White Charger"? Doesn't really bear dwelling on does it??

    Geoff

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    On eBay there are some picture postcards of couples doing the Maxixe, circa 1912. As the poses reveal, this was no timid dance.

  11. #11
    Pat Cook
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    Sir Geoffrey penned: "Heard from Behe last week - still as objectionable as ever I'm afraid! Even tried to suggest that pink really wasn't Cook's colour for a ball gown!"

    Oh, he's still upset because I made fun of that chartreuse chiffon he had on - I mean, REALLY! - Pastels are SOOO out!

    In glorious Technicolor,
    Cook, in a flowing lavender robe with epaulets.

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    Cook, exactly WHICH lavender robe are you wearing? I swear if Phil doesn't stop passing that damn kimono around, I'm going to be forced to tell that he wears peekaboo-lace knickers... oops.

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    And pray Randy, what's wrong with peekaboo knickers? I've been wearing 'em for years, although in my case there's a darned sight more "boo" than "peek"!!

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    !!!!!!!!!! all the better my dear Sir to go with your - what was that? - your hairy toes!

  15. #15
    Pat Cook
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    And he wonders why I look better in a ball gown!

  16. #16
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    Somebody once said that the only thing I'd look good in is a shroud! One with a tear in (Turin) get it? Oh, please yourselves!

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    Ragtime lives on! At last I have the perfect ensemble for the Gilded Age convention in Newport in April. At last the intricacies of the Grizzly Bear and Lame Duck shall be revealed. Geoff, Old Twinkletoes- shall we tango? You may clench the rose in your teeth- now if we only had 4 good knees between us. . .
    http://vintagedancers.org/

  18. #18
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    Shelley me dear, I'll clench the rose between my teeth with pleasure - but nobody will see it in my pocket!


    Geoff (swatting up on his "Bunny Hug".)

  19. #19
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    Reading these posts, I'm reminded of the big dance tunes that I remember, and often resurface:
    1. "The Hokey Pokey";
    2. "The Chicken Dance"; and,
    3. The "New York, New York" kickline.
    What will future generations think of those pieces, along with the "Y-M-C-A" spelling move, and "The Macarena"?

    RE: "where would we be without Irving Berlin?". Besides the obvious answer that "someone else would have had to write 'God Bless America' for Kate Smith to perform", we might not have had the famous GI piece, "Oh How I Hate To Get Up In the Morning" (yes, I often feel that way @ 6:15 AM).
    BTW, Irving Berlin once performed "Oh How I Hate To Get Up In the Morning" at a GI benefit: a soldier turned to another, and said "I'll bet the composer is now spinning in his grave, after hearing HIM sing that piece".

    Also, Shelly, how many of the Irving Berlin stamps have you now bought?
    This can be our true "fan appreciation statement": buy out the new U.S. postage stamp issue. That happened with the Snoopy stamps, last year.

    My favorite 1912 tunes, from Ian Whitcomb's CD:
    1. "The White Star March";
    2. "The Glowworm";
    3. "The Merry Widow Waltz"; and
    4. "I Love To Be Beside the Seaside".

    John Clifford

  20. #20
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    Thanks John- I had not seen the Irving Berlin stamp- am on my way to the post office!

  21. #21
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    Hi Shelley.

    The Irving Berlin stamp was just issued by the Postal Service. Now I can see it nicely displayed by the TITANIC (movie) stamp that was featured in the "Celebrating the 90s" Series.

    I also found myself thinking about two other dance tunes:
    1. The Mexican Hat Dance; and
    2. The Bunny Hop.
    What would have been the equivalent pieces in 1912?

    John Clifford

  22. #22
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    The Grizzly Bear and Turkey Trot were ragtime rages- as well as The Lame Duck- no kidding. I believe there were others too-the animal craze. AM marvelling over the news that Berlin wrote 1500 songs in his lifetime- Alexander's Ragtime Band of 1911 being his first megahit. There's a great book which came out in 1997 about his hits from 1907-1914 by Charles Hamm-he had 190 tunes on the chart in that period.

  23. #23
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    A toast to Gabrielle "Gaby" Deslys- blonde bombshell who introduced the striptease to Paris and was the hottest tamale in London in 1911. She created the french version of the American ragtime with the Gaby Glide and was the reason Charlie Frohman was on the Lusitania in 1915 to see her in "Rosy Rapture". She worked as a French spy during WWI and sadly died of a throat infection much too young in 1920.

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    Hey all,

    Here are some titles for dance songs from "The GEM Dance Folio" published by Shapiro in 1912. They were to accompany two-steps, medley waltzes, polkas, gavottes, and ragtime "barn dances." You will note that some sound pretty steamy for those days. A few are sweet. Others are just plain hilarious:

    Let Me Be The First One Dearie
    Big Blonde Baby
    Roo-Ti-Toot (On Your Ragtime Flute)
    Dat Lovin' Touch
    Come Love and Play Peek-a-boo
    Make Me Love You Like I Never Loved Before
    Roll Me Around Like a Hoop, My Dear
    Pollywogg Wiggle
    The Baboon Baby Dance
    I've Got a Ragtime Bee in My Bonnet
    Somehow, Sometime, Someplace
    Every Moment You're Lonesome, I'm Lonesome, Too
    When a Girl Whose Heart is Breaking Loves a Boy Who Does Not Care
    If All the Girls in All This World Were Just as Nice as You
    The Turkey Gobbler's Ball
    A Liitle Bit of Irish

    There are many more but these were the most interesting titles. I think they sum up well the charm and naivete of the pre-WWI years.








  25. #25
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    Hello, all.

    This has probably been covered elsewhere, but was there any dancing on the "Titanic"? I have always thought not, but after reading the above posts (very informative!)began to wonder again.

    Thanks,
    Doug

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    Randy - "The Baboon Baby Dance" - is that the one Behe was doing when I met him in S. Carolina? Or were his pants too tight?

    Geoff

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    Hallo Sir Geoffrey,

    I think that old George was attempting the "Pollywogg Wiggle." I have recently found that I'm actually quite proficient at the "Roll Me Around Like a Hoop, My Dear." And don't you do a mean rendition of "Come Love and Play Peek-a-boo?" So who is it that does the "Baboon Baby Dance?" Hmmm...I've got it! It's Phil G! In fact I hear he's going to demonstrate his best moves very soon!

    Randy

    PS) For shame! You know George looks just fine in those tight pants

  28. #28
    George Behe
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    I just can't breathe. . . :-)

  29. #29
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    Jazz was coming into its own in 1912, sme for blues, and some of the earliest blues recordings are from around this time..many of the old blues artists were so reluctant to be recorded.

    Im rather keen on the 1910 hit "Come Josephine In My Flying Machine". I seem to recall a mighty mouse cartoon, or which ever one has the 'follow the bouncing ball' segment, and id find myself singing to the Josephine song, or the song that went,
    M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-i, it used to be so hard to spell it used to make me cry".

    of course in 1912 Irving Berlin was the craze..with Alexanders Ragtime Band..



    Tarn stephanos

  30. #30
    Patricia Bowman Rogers Winship
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    In the midst of reading shelves in the Newark Public Library's music reference collection, I saw a 1911 dance music folio. None of the titles were familiar. I'll get it out tomorrow and post a list of them.

    Pat W.

  31. #31
    Patricia Bowman Rogers Winship
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    All right, here it is. Randy had the Gem Dance Folio for 1912. Here are some of the 1911 selections from the same series.

    "You are the Ideal of my Dreams/All that I ask of you is Love" Medley Waltz

    "Any Little Girl that's a Nice LIttle Girl is the Right Little Girl for Me/The Belle of the Barber's Ball" Medley Barn Dance

    "Angel Eyes/My Little Kangaroo" Medley Two-Step

    "The Top of the Morning/Little Lady in the Moon" Medley Waltz

    "I Will Always Love You, Dear/Won't You Let Me Build a Nest for You" Medley Two-Step

    "Go Find a Sweetheart from the Emerald Isle/I'm a Member of the Midnight Crew" Medley Gavotte

    "Say, Boys! I've Found a Girl/You Ain't Got the Girl till the Ring is on Her Finger" Medley Schottische

    "Love Me just Like Romeo Loved Miss Juliet/My Garden Blooms for You" Medley Waltz

    "Loving Ways/That Dancing Big Banshee" Medley Two-Step

    "Mister Johnson, Good Night/Everybody's Ragtime Crazy" Medley Two-Step

    That's a representative selection. Anybody want to go cut a rug? :-)

    Pat W


  32. #32
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    Pat,

    I just love it! I haven't danced a step in my life - my Baptist upbringing saw to it that I never learned - but I feel like "cuttin' a rug" or two. After I've had my coffee. that is! Where shall we meet up?

    Thanks for posting those!
    Randy

  33. #33
    Patricia Bowman Rogers Winship
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    Well, Randy, I barely can myself. But we can dream, can't we!

    Pat W.

  34. #34
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    The racy lyrics of this 1912 ragtime tune, called "Rag it! Rag it!" are pretty funny. Some of the words seem suited to a modern day rap song:

    Rag it, Rag it! Tear it to bits
    That's the way they're making music
    That's the way they're making hits!

    Jump on it, thump on it!
    Tear it right into
    If you want to to make it ragged
    That's the way you've got to do!

    You've got to kill it, spill it
    Eat it up alive!

    Etc, etc.


  35. #35
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    Kill it, spill it, Eat it up alive???

    Yipes! Jeffery Dahmer would have *loved* that one!

  36. #36
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    I am this afternoon recovering from a hectic night spent on the dance-floor at Mahiki and I'm feeling just the tiniest bit special as a result...

    I wonder if anybody can enlighten me on what the famous dances of 1910-1914 period were actually LIKE - both to watch and to participate in? So many dances have passed into history as being representative of the periods in which they were popular - the minuet for the stately eighteenth-century, the Charleston for the Roaring Twenties (which I have been known to attempt myself), rock n' roll for the Fifties and so on. It seems an accepted fact that the young and fashionable were absolutely dance crazy in the run-up to the Great War, with new sensations like the Double Boston, the Maxixe, the Bunny Hug and the Turkey Trot spilling out, one after another, and the Tango carrying all before it - as somebody recently pointed out on another thread, the Kaiser absolutely forbade any of his officers to dance the latter whilst in uniform. The sheer popularity of these numbers had an impact on contemporary fashion - split and draped skirts, less restrictive corsetry and ballerina-style dancing shoes. But I'm afraid I can't visualise any of them, having never seen them 'live', so to speak. What was all the fuss about?

    Irene Castle, together with her husband Vernon, perhaps personifies the 1912-1915 era better than anybody else - did the couple ever appear on film together?

  37. #37
    sashka pozzetti
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    The Castles appear on film in "The Whirl of Life" which still exists, but it is much easier to see a copy of The Vernon and Irene Castle story. It is a fun film in which fantastic Fred recreates in real detail the Castle dances, and they even recreate some of the beautiful clothes, including Lucile creations!!

  38. #38
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    I went to a wedding last weekend and, somewhat to my surprise (because neither the bride nor groom were of Scottish extraction), there was Scottish country dancing after supper. It was actually tremendous fun. Each dance (the Virginia Reel, the Eightsome Reel, the Dashing White Sergeant etc) was 'called' by the band leader - we all had a walk-through and then, without further ado, got going. By the end of the evening, every one of the guests was joining in and it certainly broke some social ice!

    It did occur to me, however, that it was all VERY energetic. The whirling and twirling and stripping the willow generated a real sweat - most of the men were still in full morning dress, very much akin to Edwardian white-tie, and we were literally drenched at the end of each set. For the first time, it came home to me how damp (to put it delicately) many ball-goers must have been at the turn of the last century, trussed up in corsets, elbow-length gloves, long skirts, high-heeled slippers and starched shirts, charging around stuffy ballrooms at the height of the summer season. Those famous ostrich feather fans must have been much needed! Does anybody know of any period memoirs or records in which ladies or gentlemen describe the measures they took to combat excessive perspiration or of the physical discomforts induced by such vigorous activity at crowded parties? From the top of my head, I can't think of any, although I seem to recall reading that the men were required to wear gloves so as not to stain (with sweat) the pastel dresses of their partners.

  39. #39
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    I saw a chap on TV recently, discussing the music of the Strauss family.

    He explained that there are sections in the long waltzes that are relatively quiet and calm. During these passages, the dancers often just swayed gently on one spot, thus recovering ready for the next bout of rapid dancing. I always wondered how dancers survived things the length of a Strauss waltz.
    Dave Gittins
    Titanic: Monument and Warning.
    http://titanicebook.com/Book.html

  40. #40
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    I know a bit about English country dancing in the Regency period (early 1800's) In the assembly rooms of Beau Brummel's and Jane Austen's time, the country dance were performed in a slower and statelier fashion than the farmers and mechanics performed them in the market square and the fairground. Most of them were progressive dances. In a set of 4 or 6 or 8 couples, the couples form into lines. The first couple starts the dance with the second, then with the third, and so forth, until they have progressed to the bottom of the set. Then they can rest. When couple #1 have progressed between the lines past #3 or #4, (depending on the dance), couple #2 starts off, following couple #1 until they get to the bottom. So there are times in the dance when the inactive couples can rest, fan, flirt, converse with their partners and opposites.

    A real whoop and holler country dance is a lot of fun, and I agree, lively. The Jane Austen/Beau Brummel style of the 'genteel' is graceful and very nice to do, as well as to observe. Now, I use a lot of talcum powder in the rest room to keep down the glow. Perfume too. Dancing slippers do wear out quickly. I understand that the ladies brought at least one spare pair to balls.

    Of course I'm talking about 100 years before Titanic. The waltz was different between those two periods. The Titanic era also had ragtime and cakewalks and such, which were energetic. I think they had deodourant too.

  41. #41
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    >Does anybody know of any period memoirs or records in which ladies or gentlemen describe the measures they took to combat excessive perspiration or of the physical discomforts induced by such vigorous activity at crowded parties?

    The best place to look, if you are in the US, is in the advertiment sections of magazines targeted at women. The first of thousands of "You might not be aware that you smell bad, but you really do" ad campaigns seem to have surfaced ca. 1900. The ones directed at men seemed quite to the point~ an ad screaming "SMELLY ARMPITS?" ran forever in the Police Gazette~ whereas those aimed at women seemed more subtle, but also considerably more insidious. They are heavy in text, and wax rhapsodical about how "You bathe, you powder, you put on fresh clothing~ but when you get to the party, how do you smell?" In short- they drove home the message "Your best efforts might not be good enough. You probably smell bad." Some of the ads DO talk about dancing, tennis, bicycling in great detail.

    Guides for hygiene are, oddly, modest on this point. They suggest frequent sponge baths, and emphasize that clothing MUST be kept "fresh." But when it comes to the O GOD I'M AT THE PARTY AND I REEK, NOW WHAT DO I DO? question they are silent. I assume, perhaps wrongly, that if a woman was wearing something off the shoulder, she could excuse herself at decent intervals and- if necessary- wash carefully in the rest room. If you were a man, I suppose the best you could do was hope that the three or four layers of clothing you were wearing were thick enough to contain any personal odor.

  42. #42
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    Here's a 1907 ad for NO-O-DOR.

    "An odorless, antiseptic toilet powder, soft as down, which instantly and surely destroys perspiring odors. Dusted on the dress shield, the feet or wherever perspiration prevails and gently rubbed with the hand NO-O-DOR gives that delightful after-the-bath feeling, toning the body and causing the pores to perform their natural functions."

    NO-O-DOR was of course basically talcum powder, which was often promoted as a means of providing comfort, if not fragrance. In a 1903 ad for Colgate Violet Talc we are advised to: "Use freely before walking or more violent exercise and you will save yourself much chafing and discomfort, from which almost everyone suffers in warm weather."



  43. #43
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    Somewhere, I have a wonderful, neurosis-inspiring advertising graphic, contemporary to this one, in which a Gibson Girl type sits smiling at the center of a table laid out Last Supper style. Everyone else at the table, to her right and to her left, has turned to look at her with varying degrees of horror. Yes. Catastrophic deodorant failure.

    I suspect that 20 years prior to the You Reek And You Don't Even Know It trend in advertising, with indoor plumbing, perfumed soaps, and societally-induced Low Self Image still far in the future for most people, sweating and such was not quite as big a faux-pas as it would become since the majority of people probably practiced the same level of hygiene and smelled about the same. When everyone had the traditional once a week Friday or Saturday night bath, and sponge bathed the rest of the week, there would have HAD to have been a different threshhold between "acceptable" and "unacceptable" personal odor.

  44. #44
    sashka pozzetti
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    Is 'no-o-dor' related to my favorite, and much advertised early C20th toiletry 'O-Dor-O-No'?

  45. #45
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    Here is a scary one, on many different levels:




    Why has "Doug" lost interest? It's wartime. Why isn't he in the Army? Is his latent homosexuality no longer quite as latent as it once was and manifesting itself through erectile dysfunction?

  46. #46
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    No- it's ALL JANE'S FAULT! The most personal of personal odors has left Doug flaccid. BUT, a happy solution has been sterilizing the toilet all along!


  47. #47
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    But, happiness and internal burns soon reign at Chez Doug.


    I think that with this campaign, which started in the 1920s and ended some time after 1944, the American obsession with "Offensive Personal Odor" reached its apex (or nadir?) after which the overall tone became a bit more subdued and subliminal.

  48. #48
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    Later versions, of course, did not miss out on the opportunity for a double whammy.



  49. #49
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    Sashka, Odorono deodorants were first sold in 1911, so some people on the Titanic might well have been free of offensive odours (though possibly not those in the boiler rooms). As far as I know the manufacturer, Northam Warren, had no connection with the NO-O-DOR Company. Clearly Odorono wasn't the first product to combat the dreaded 'BO', but the company (or rather the J Walter Thompson advertising agency) can lay claim to having invented the term.
    .

  50. #50
    sashka pozzetti
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    So is there a sister product 'odor-o-yes' ? :-)

    I wonder if there is a surviving example of o-dor-o-no or similar anywhere, and what it might smell like.

  51. #51
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    And was there a version for people who weren't really all that bothered, called 'Odo-ro-what-the-hell'? During World War 2 there was a series of Odo-ro-no ads which reminded both war workers and Service personnel that the risks of being shot, bayoneted, drowned, incinerated or blown to atoms were as nothing compared to the risk of causing offence through a lack of personal freshness. "In hot weather especially, the greater the strain the greater the risk of underarm stain." This risk was said to be a special concern for those in uniform, when the action of saluting could not be performed with confidence by those who had failed to slap on the Odo-ro-no within the last seven days.
    .

  52. #52
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    >Later versions, of course, did not miss out on the opportunity for a double whammy.

    Potential triple whammy. During the 1970s there were at least two separate products marketed for men in the U.S. that dealt with the... equivalent...problem...(One was by a company named Pub II and was called "Below the Belt" and the other was simply named "Men's Other Deodorant") and one could just as easily re-write the dialogue balloons in the first panel to reflect....ummmm..... the friction caused by the now spring-morning-fresh Jane's sudden disinterest, and make it the final panel in the Lysol ad to keep the story going.

  53. #53
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    Sashka- It (Odorono) is still available, although in several decades of compulsive deodorant application, I've never seen it on a store shelf:

    http://www.walgreens.com/store/produ...edBrand=303861

  54. #54
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    On a (somewhat related) tangent ~ as amusing as the name "Odor-o-no" is, imagine the unamused feelings of the stockholders in THIS company after 1982. The TV and radio ads VERY quickly caused people to do double-takes....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTitP5_yDUU

  55. #55
    sashka pozzetti
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    I can't believe it! Its like seeing something come back from the dead. It never occurred to me that Odor-o-no would be a brand that still existed. The world now seems a happier place! Thanks!!! :-)

  56. #56
    Senior Member
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    Nowadays it's marketed as Odorono, but in all the old ads I've seen it's Odo-ro-no, which was perhaps an attempt to avoid direct use of the offensive word 'odor' (to us Brits who know how to spell proper, that's of course 'odour' :-). The Japanese, incidentally, are concerned with an entirely different problem resulting from perspiration. Their popular soft drink with the wonderful name of Pocari Sweat "is a healthy beverage that smoothly replaces the lost water and electrolytes during perspiration." I wonder what J Walter Thompson would make of that. Personally, I wouldn't be too keen on downing a flagon of Pocari Sweat, but rather that than this:

    http://www.volkskrantblog.nl/pub/mm/1128268499.jpg

  57. #57
    sashka pozzetti
    Guest
    I think it was called Odor-o-no as it looked and sounded like one of the exotic french or persian type names that were fashionable at the time.The ads I have seen follow this theme. Except this was cheap! :-)

  58. #58
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2007
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    745
    It did strike me, Marilyn, that there was a marked similarity between the Scottish reeling I enjoyed last weekend and the dances I've seen portrayed in recent film and television adaptations of Jane Austen's novels. The waltz did not arrive in England until the second decade of the nineteenth century (around 1812/1814) and was considered decidedly risque for quite some years afterward.

    It does indeed seem likely, as you suggest, that country dancing in fashionable Regency, Victorian and Edwardian ballrooms was altogether more stately and decorous than in the barns and on the village greens where it originated. The raunchy Argentinian tango, so popular just before the Great War, had to be polished up before it passed muster in polite society - and, even then, it caused more than its fair share of raised eyebrows and disapproving frowns!

    Nevertheless, I've frequently been amused by the way in which dance music is employed by film-makers to accentuate the class divisions of 1912. In both 'A Night to Remember' and 'Titanic', first-class passengers listen with faintly bored expressions to the genteel strains of a string quartet. 'The Blue Danube' is about as lively as it gets for them! A few decks below, the steerage passengers are shown to be having far more fun with their energetic jigs and reels. Kate Winslet's liberation from the repressed and stuffy world of high society is portrayed - none too subtly - in this very way.

    Of course, as anybody with more than a passing interest in the Edwardian Era knows, the likes of the Bunny Hug and the Turkey Trot - so fashionable during this period - were FAR from decorous, involving very vigorous activity and close contact between partners. Country dancing - English, Scottish or Irish - must have seemed tame by comparison. And, it goes without saying, any number of first-class passengers would have been as likely to know their way around a reel as the humblest traveller in steerage.

  59. #59
    Senior Member
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    The science .. goodness, how complicated it is.
    http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Anti...ant-Stick.html

    I remembering selling large amounts of Odor-O-No in the early 60s when my father had a pharmacy (and I helped out, though far too young legally). There were other products, but that name did sell stuff, no matter how obvious it was. Young people now have no idea how odororiferous those days were - and we who lived then, ignored it by and large, I think. Habit. Coal fires, sweat and personal odour, damp raincoats, tobacco, wet dogs etc., and you should have experienced the cinema or the buses and underground trains! It all changed abruptly in the early 1960s, as people probably realized that life stank. Possibly due to the Americans, who were still here in some quantities on Bases, and who worried more about personal hygiene. Good for them, I say, it made a big difference, but I think it was really the science.

  60. #60
    Senior Member
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    How well I remember, Mon. And many's the time we praised the Lord for the invention of Air Wick. That's still available, of course, but not in the traditional 'riser' form, ready for action within minutes. Another hot weather essential was the Flit fly spray, a bicycle pump attached to a huge reservoir which dispensed suffocating clouds of DDT in all directions (mostly backwards), with an affect akin to tear gas. Had the flies on their backs in no time and didn't do us a lot of good either, but much kinder to the ozone layer than an aerosol. By far the safest method of dealing with unwanted visitors of all kinds was the strip of sticky fly paper suspended from the ceiling. Usually reserved for narrow dark hallways.
    .

  61. #61
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2000
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    6,085
    >By far the safest method of dealing with unwanted visitors of all kinds was the strip of sticky fly paper suspended from the ceiling.

    The kitchen in my Middle School cafeteria had them, blatantly visible for all to see.

  62. #62
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Howdy Folks
    Fly Paper! Sticky, yucky, icky fly paper. I too remember the blatant flypaper that would hang in a bouncy curl right above the heat trays where we young children would get our lunch for the day. My brother swore he saw a fly drop from the sticky paper right into the goulash. Of course he would chew his ice cream just to spit it up right in front of me and re-eat it. Because he knew that without a doubt I would go screaming from the room thoroughly grossed out.

  63. #63
    Senior Member
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    4,549
    My uncle once edited a fly paper.
    Dave Gittins
    Titanic: Monument and Warning.
    http://titanicebook.com/Book.html

 

 

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