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First Class Restaurants

This discussion on "First Class Restaurants" is in the Eating on Board section; Originally Posted by Robert T. Paige This brings up a question.: Just who would Mrs. ...

      
   
  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert T. Paige View Post
    This brings up a question.:
    Just who would Mrs. J. J. Brown have been assigned with in a group as mentioned ? (I'm not going to make the mistake of using "Molly Brown." :-) ) Did she ever eat at The Captain's Table ?
    Would the Chief Steward have had a problem there ? :-)
    Forgive me, but you're running afoul of popular misconceptions about Mrs. Brown. At the time of her sailing on board Titanic, she was far from a nobody, and her social standing was not that of the brash parvenu of legend. She was divorced by this time, with a handsome settlement and alimony (the alimony alone was equivalent to about $15,000 monthly today), and she was a patron of the arts, a philanthropist, a supporter of women's suffrage, a founder of the Denver Women's Club and the juvenile court system in America and had run - unsuccessfully, it is true - for the Senates of both Colorado and the United States, though she could not legally vote until 1920, when American women were finally granted that right. In 1902, she lent her Denver house to the Governor of Colorado to use as his official residence while the State's Governor's Mansion was being remodeled. She was on very good terms with John Jacob Astor, and had much more social polish than movies depict; she was fluent in several languages and was well-read. I doubt she could have "passed" for old money, but my sense of her, after reading about her extensively, is that she herself had a rueful sense of humor about the situation and rather wisely, decided not to care too much for the opinions of others. In addition, she dressed well and tastefully.

    She could not possibly have been ignored by any Chief Steward who valued his continued employment.

    P.S.: Despite my unkind words about motion-picture depictions of Mrs. Brown, her portrayal by Kathy Bates in the Cameron film is actually fairly reasonable. She is shown mixing with Astor, her wardrobe is correct, and the rough edges she never quite rounded off are not entirely overdone by Ms. Bates. It's a sympathetic portrait, if perhaps not accurate in every least detail.
    Dave Brangan likes this.

  2. #22
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    Thanks for sharing. I have heard about this extraordinary woman, however, I did not know exactly what she was famous for. She was a very accomplished woman and ahead of her time regarding women's rights and the role of women during this time period.

  3. #23
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    I share Sandy's comments as to the portrayal of Mrs. Brown.

    "Titanic" (1997) was much better IMHO than ANTR.
    I don't think Astor would have addressed her as "Molly" though .
    I understand she was actually quite intellectual and fluent in several language after traveling in Europe
    and her fluency in several languages was used in her contacts with immigrant survivors aboard Carpathia.

  4. #24
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    Robert:

    There is one touch in the Cameron film I like very much. Obviously, it never actually happened, but it accords well with my sense of what Mrs. Brown might have been like.

    I refer to the moment when Jack Dawson (Leonardo di Caprio, of course), is momentarily taken aback by the ranks of cutlery flanking his place at the "swells'" table in the First Class dining room. Mrs. Brown spots his dismay, and swiftly gives him solid, correct advice on how to cope - "Start from the outside, and work your way in."

    It's a well-thought-out bit that sums up Mrs. Brown's trip from the underclass to a member of what Emily Post used to term "best society." She has learned her lessons, and knows how to impart them quickly, practically and without embarrassing this defenseless young man as she herself has been embarrassed.

    As I say, it never happened. But it gives insight into the generous spirit I believe the woman to have possessed, and that's good enough for me.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matteo Eyre View Post
    Wow that is most confusing!! on those grounds then would the jewish people like Strauss and Bauman have sat together?? or those with young children like the Allisons the Carters have sat together?? or those i believe to be excentric like Stead and the Duff Gordons?? Is it known of any people who definately sat with selected people like i'm pretty sure the Astors sat with the Wideners?? Or who served who??
    Cheers Sandy
    Matteo

    Children in first class were not permitted to eat in the dining room with their parents. I read somewhere that the Laroche's booked in second class had originally planned to purchase first class tickets but switched due to the no children in the first class dining room policy. Though I am not completely sure to the validity of the Laroche family originally planning to travel first class.

  6. #26
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    They had originally intended to travel on the French liner La France, which presumably had an adults-only dining policy in both 1st and 2nd Class.

 

 
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