Titanic forum and community
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 123

Do you have a passion that rivals your Titanic interest

This discussion on "Do you have a passion that rivals your Titanic interest" is in the The Fascination of Titanic section; Is there a topic that fascinates you as much as Titanic? For example, any avid ...

      
   
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    Is there a topic that fascinates you as much as Titanic? For example, any avid Titanic buffs here,who are also avid convention-attending Trekkers?

    I have a lifelong obsession with Titanic- but I also love music- I'm a bonafide Beatlemaniac- and collect rare Beatles recordings- I saw MACCA live 4 times, and Ringo twice- what a thrill! I'm also a lifelong Doors fan, collect rare Doors performances, and wrote for a Doors music fanzine for many years-I've seen the 3 surviving Doors live in one form or another, as well as the new Doors lineup live with Ian Astbury on vocal. When I visited Paris in 2001, I visited Jim Morrison's grave before I visited the Nomadic........
    I love Star Trek, but not so much that I'd dress as a Nausican and attend a convention- I've been to conventions, but dress in plain old civilian duds.......

    I'm more of a Whovian than a Trekker- In fact I'm a hardcore Whovian (a fan of the British sci fi tv show 'Doctor Who'). Patrick Troughton was by far my favorite Doctor- followed by Jon Pertwee and William Hartnell. Tom Baker was overrated. Peter Davidson was good- but humorless- Colin Baker was as annoying as his coat, Sylvester mcCoy was excellent, but was given dreadful stories- and Paul Magann never had a chance to develop. His one appearance was very good, and he's shined on the Big Finish 'Dr Who' audio adventures..As for the most recent Doctors- Christopher Eccleson -he was superb- he gave the Doctor an anguished vulnerability, but David Tennant is dreadful- He's too over the top, too cocky...
    I met Jon Levine (Sgt Benton) at a Doctor Who convention- he was one of the nicest people I ever met...People assert Billie Piper was the sexiest companion- she was sexy, but couldn't hold a candle to Katie Manning....

    It's been revealed the 9th Doctor sailed the Titanic- I hope that story is explored on one of the Doctor who BBC novels or 'Big Finish' audio adventures..

    I do love sci fi- I liked the Star Wars films, but they never moved me the way Doctor Who and Star trek succeeded in doing...

    What else (other than the Titanic) captivates your interest- Sci Fi? WW2? Elvis? Aviation? the Civil war? Lizzie Borden?



    regards

    tarn Stephanos

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,687
    For me, I have enjoyed Agatha Christie stories, re-reading some that I read many years ago, and reading others for the first time, and looking forward to re-reading them. This September I plan to visit Ms. Christie's hometown of Torquay, and walk "The Agatha Christie Mile". I hope to have read all her mysteries before September (not hard as one can read them practically "cover to cover" in one day).

    I, too, enjoy the Beatles, and it was great to visit Liverpool and take the Beatles Tour.
    Tarn, you'll have to let us know how you enjoyed the Liverpool sites.

    Finally, I admit that I am intrigued by the story of the 17th Century Jesuit missionaries who setlled in the Great Lakes and upstate New York areas, and are now known as the North American, or Canadian, Martyrs: Saint Isaac Jogues, Jean de Brebeuf, and companions. They are the patron saints of my church, and next year I would like to visit the shrine dedicated to them, in Midland, Ontario.

    I also wonder if anyone has an interest that was also a passionate pursuit of any of Titanic's passengers and/or crew.

  3. #3
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    You should meet my Brother Tarn he loves The Doors as well. He also likes the poetry of Jim Morrison.

    I love Ghost Stories, Horror movies especially George Romero. I saw Death Ship (not Romero) because it took place on a ship and was supposed to be scary but was corny instead.

    Also Interested in old Hollywood and life in general in America during the Teens and Twenties, World War I and the Spanish Influenza outbreak, Prohibition and Speakeasies. Love the 1960s. Peace, love and all that. I went though a Lizzie Borden phase. Read a novel about her in the early 90's but the name escapes me. I have too many interests. I could go on and on.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    The Lizzie Borden case was fascinating-
    I read an interesting sci fi tale- a time traveler traveled back to the Lizzie Borden house to determine who the killer was- He surpised the father by appearing out of nowhere. A fight ensued and the time traveler wound up killing him...

    I'm also a horror fan- classic horor, such as Nosferatu, Night Of The Living Dead (1968), the Exorcist, most of the hammer movies.....
    I collect horror comic books, put out by DC and marvel, in the 1960s and 1970s...

    One of my favorite actors is Vincent Price- I enjoy all the Roger Coreman films he appeared in, that had an Edgar Allen Poe slant.

    In the 'Masque of the Red Death', Price costarred with Jane Asher, who at that very time was dating one Paul McCartney of the Fab 4....

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    4,549
    I'm fairly well acquainted with serious music, especially lieder and opera. I'm an old racing cyclist and still follow the sport as a minor official. Then there's sailing, which I hope to resume next summer, when my yacht is back in good shape.

    I like to keep up with current affairs via the internet. I'm not able to read paper, especially newspapers, as easily as I can read a screen, thanks to eye problems. I watch very little TV, other than the footy.

    There are also two black cats that are demanding my attention, so I'd better attend to them.
    Dave Gittins
    Titanic: Monument and Warning.
    http://titanicebook.com/Book.html

  6. #6
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Tarn
    Night of The Living Dead 1968, now that's a Classic. http://home.comcast.net/~axlish/NOTLD68.htm
    Check out this website for color photos of the cast and the original screenplay and more.

    I liked the Nosferatu 1979 remake better Although watching Max Schreck perform in the original was a treat.
    Love Edgar Allen Poe his Poem Annabel Lee is my favorite.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,239
    I'm a huge sports and music fan; baseball, hockey, basketball and football. As far as music, I am a die hard Genesis and U2 fan, and am going to a Genesis concert in September.
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

  8. #8
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Hi Jason

    I hope you have fun. Genesis was an Honorary on VH1 Rock Honors this week.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,239
    Hi George,

    Thanks, I'm sure I will. Good to know they were on VH1.
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    Hi Jason
    Genesis is a great band...Seems only yesterday abacab was the most popular video on MTV.....

    Were they a better band when Peter Gabriel was still in the group, or did they really shine when Phil Collins took over lead vocal?
    I prefered gabriel's solo work, songs like 'Sledge Hammer' and 'Shock the Monkey'.

    Im a bit of a sports fan- all Boston teams of course- Boston Red Sox, Boston Bruins, Boston Celtics, the New England Patriots and the New England revolution...

    The 1972 lineup of the Boston Bruins was amazing- with the legendary Bobby Orr

    The 1986 Boston Celtics was tops, and watching a Celtics vs Lakers game in those days was an amazing experience..

    Needless to say, i was on cloud 9 when the red sox finally broke the curse and won the world series in 2004.


    I HATE the New york Yankees....

    I like the Mets though....and I love the classic Brooklyn Dogers..

  11. #11
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,239
    Hi Tarn,

    I love "Abacab". Genesis was good when Peter Gabriel was the lead singer, but when Phil Collins took over the role, the group really took off and has not looked back since. They did invite Gabriel to be a part of the tour (they're touring in Europe right now), but he's too busy with his own projects.

    As a die hard Blue Jays fan (and I love all the Toronto teams for that matter), I hate the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox.
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    well as long as you hate the NY Yankees....

  13. #13
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,239
    Funny enough, they have the same record as us; only difference is the payroll.
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    I love hockey as well- Ever since I saw the movie 'Slapshot'.
    The violent triplets, the Hanson brothers, are my heroes....

    Funny thing, our greatest player, Bobby Orr was a Canadian- jason was he from toronto?

  15. #15
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,239
    Nope, Bobby Orr was from Parry Sound, Ont; which is actually only a few hours drive from here.
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

  16. #16
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    I like the Springfield Cardinals and that's about it. I work for vending company that manages their refreshment stands so I get to see all the Games. When I was growing up it was the Chicago Cubs. Go Cards Go Cubs

  17. #17
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,239
    The Cubs are a sad team; they haven't won a World Series in almost a hundred years.
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    George, when I was working at Cheers in Boston, we had scores of tourists from Chicago- I voiced my happiness that the Chicago White sox won the series- Red Sox fans knew how White sox fans felt when they won the world Series after so many decades..... Yet many Chicago people spoke ill of the White Sox- I assumed all Chicago natives were thrilled when the White Sox won the series...but not so....I have met people from Chicago who HATE the Chicago White Sox. Why do they hate them so??
    I'd love to see the Chicago Cubs win the world series- Its been nearlly 100 years since their last series win..

  19. #19
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    I Hear you on that. I still hope but I kinda figure it ain't gonna happen anytime soon.
    It's tradition in our family though so that was the way I was raised. The Springfield Cardinals are not much better. we're certainly dragging this year. I hope my boss doesn't see this.

  20. #20
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    We're not even from Ill. We're from Iowa. Never really understood why we are Cubs, we just are. I think my Grandpa Lorton started that mess.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,085
    >Night Of The Living Dead

    Was disappointed by the colorized version of the 1968 film put out in the 1990s. Tinting the "cemetery man" in the opening sequence green was a bit of a mistake~ unless Barbara was color blind or a complete idiot, the green skin would have been a....ummm...dead.... giveaway that something was amiss. Judith O'Dea (Barbara) is acting again, and has a couple of films coming out this year.

    Carnival of Souls is my favorite from that era. There were about 47 different edits of that film circulating during the video era, each with footage missing from the others and each, in turn, missing key scenes. I'm STILL not confident I've seen the entire thing.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    Hi Jim
    For some reason in the colorized version of the 1968 'Night of The Livng Dead', the color is so off, everyone looks like they have hepititis...

    The early 1990s remake with Tony Todd as Ben was okay, although the different ending was questionable. Rather than have Barbara as being in shock and detached, in the remake she took the inititive in shooting the zombies- and in the end she shot Cooper in the head.

    The original was much better- The anniversary edition was curious, as several new scenes were filmed......

    One of the classic lines fram horror cinema came from 'Night of the Living Dead"

    ..."They're coming to get you Barbara"!!

    For 1960s Horror, its hard to match the British Hammer films. I enjoyed the chemistry between Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing. Also, any Roger Coreman film with Vincent Price is also a treat- Price could be a ham, but the man had a singular charm....
    He was stellar in 'The Last Man on Earth' and 'The Abominable Dr Phibes'...

  23. #23
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Jim Says>>Tinting the "cemetery man" in the opening sequence green was a bit of a mistake~ unless Barbara was color blind or a complete idiot, the green skin would have been a....ummm...dead.... giveaway that something was amiss.<<

    George says ha ha how true.

    Carnival Of Souls was one bizarre Movie for its time. It was really different but I liked it.

    I have The Last Man On Earth. It was based on Richard Matherson's I Am Legend. More Faithful to the story then The Omega Man with Charlton Heston was.

    Judith O'Dea runs her own Company now Called O'Dea Communications http://www.odeacommunications.com/showbiz.htm
    this link will take you directly to her Night Of The Living Dead Page.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,687
    [indent]
    quote:

    We're not even from Ill. We're from Iowa.
    Hi George. I guess I should ask when you say we "Ought to give Iowa a try"!!!, as opposed to "...So what the heck. You're welcome. Glad to have you with us. Even though we may not ever mention it again....".
    Yes, I apologize for those now having Meredith Willson tunes running through their heads, especially the ones with Robert Preston and Shirley Jones doing the singing.

    In re: "Night of the Living Dead" and other colorized films: I wonder how many viewers were thankful to locate the color controls, so that they could turn off the color during the colorized films: no more seeing the colors on James Cagney's coat fly off during his "Yankee Doodle Dandy" spin dance, nor seeing a peach outfit for Lana Turner's stunning doorway entrance scene in the original "The Postman Always Rings Twice".

  25. #25
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Hi John nice to meet you
    Re: Colorized films. Now I should have thought of turning off or toning down the color.

    Re: From Iowa. I'm originally from Ft. Madison Ia. right on the Mississippi River. In fact in 1997 I worked for Catfish Bend Riverboat Casino. At the time I was like "cool I'll be working on a boat and had visions of Titanic dancing in my head. I was a very young 19. The most exciting thing was when the barge which was to be our Steakhouse caught fire. Luckily I wasn't working that night but I had to scrub smoke stains off The Catfish Bend Boat the next day. Took forever and ever to get them off and by the end of the day my arms were aching so bad they were killing me. I can still remember the burnt smell too.
    Thanks for the Welcome. Hope to see you around the boards.

  26. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    73
    Things that interest me other than the Titanic?

    I am a big fan of the Beatles, and the Rolling Stones. In sport I am a Man United fan, and although I am from, and live in Ireland, I am a long suffering fan (is there any other kind??) of the New York Jets.

    I also have an big interest in the American Civil War and World War II.

  27. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,085
    >the Rolling Stones

    Gimme Shelter the only music film from that era worth watching! Unreleased X Rated 1973 tour film, with title I can't print here a must-see if you can find a bootleg.

    > Carnival of Souls

    Was checking the credits and came across:
    *Director:Herk Harvey
    *Writer:John Clifford (screen story)
    John, how very decent of you not to brag!

    >One of the classic lines fram horror cinema came from 'Night of the Living Dead"

    Also one of the classic weird Freudian images- Barbara being eaten by her brother in the final sequence. From childhood I was always put off by the fact that the lead keeps saying "Don't lock yourself in the basement, you can't escape from there" and then survives (briefly) by locking himself in the basement.

    If you are a fan of Brit. horror and suspence, I suggest picking up the Thriller anthology DVD. Not because it is good, but because it is possible the most enjoyably cheesy TV show ever. 4 or 5 season and never a single thrill. But some of the most appealingly bizarre storylines, odd casting choices (30-ish Donna Mills and 40-ish Judy Carne as the world's oldest college freshmen) and an episode that shows you who the killer is UNDER THE TITLE SEQUENCE and then moves forwards attempting to build suspence where none can possibly exist. Because, of course, you know who the killer is. (It is the local librarian, who takes the "No talking or eating in the library" rules to a new and lethal extreme. Every one of his female victims is killed crossing the lcoal bridge at 9:05 PM. Seems as if the womengfolkk can easily avoid the killer,and the police easily capture him, but HEY, this is Thriller....)

    >I guess I should ask when you say we "Ought to give Iowa a try"!!!,

    Thank you, John. You've now triggered Ronnie Howard singing "Gary Indiana" on my Internal Soundtrack that is going to remain with me through my whole work day. I owe you one!

    George: Iowa. Lizzie Borden. Ever been to, or read about Villisca? A story that makes Lizzie's seem positively..... demure.

  28. #28
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Howdy Jim,
    Villisca? why no never heard of it or if I had it's buried in a fog in the back of my brain.

    Your right Ben complains about going down in to the basement and yet that's where he ended up in thebasement. The Basement at the farm house was too nasty to use so they used the Basement at Image Ten building instead. Barbra getting eaten by her brother, thats Romero going for shock value or could be Freudian?

  29. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    58,188
    I have an interest in some sci-fi, especially some of the stuff that could be taken for serious drama such as the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica, Babylon 5, and classic Star Trek. I like Star Wars but consider it escapist, much as it's creator does.

    Beyond that, I have a real passion for naval history, particularly recent history as well as avaition.

    Current affairs and politics...naaaaahhhhhhhh....I'll give it a look so I can figure out which candidate on the ticket is the least likely to be indicted for something, but I wash my hands afterwards.

  30. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    According the the remake of 'Night Of The Living Dead', they would all have been better off had they hidden in the attic....

    I never liked the Rolling Stones- very overrated-

    Speaking of 'Night of the Living Dead', the Brit invasion band The Zombies were better than the Stones. Even the Who, the Hollies and the Dave Clark Five were better...
    The Rolling Stones wern't even worthy to collect the Beatles naval lint...

  31. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    The Italians brought the zombie genre in film to a whole new twisted level- curiously enough, the theme of zombie-necrophilia pops up in MANY these classic Italian horror movies.....

    Imagine if Russ Meyer directed a zombie movie for Hammer productions- thats the vision the Italians took, casting curvacious zombie women, who devoured- and ravaged their victims to death.......

    Ever see the classic American B movie 'Frankenhooker?


    I'm a big fan of Bruce Campbell- Sam Rami's 'Evil Dead' trilogy was brilliant, particulalry 'Evil Dead 2'- a very twisted- and very funny film.....

    2 things you will find in every Sam Rami Film- his best friend Bruce Campbell (usually in a small cameo role), and a 1973 Oldsmobile...

  32. #32
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Maybe the house used in the original didn't have an attic.

    Love the Zombies.
    The (Goblins?) did the soundtrack to the European version of Dawn of the Dead but Romero used some great music he chose in the American Theater Release cut of the film.

  33. #33
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    >>I'm a big fan of Bruce Campbell- Sam Rami's 'Evil Dead' trilogy was brilliant, particularly 'Evil Dead 2'- a very twisted- and very funny film.....<<

    >>"This is my boom stick, S Mart's top of the line, shop smart shop S Mart" Ash: Bruce Campbell in Army Of Darkness 1993
    Which I own. Also seen Part 1 and Part 2 which is a retelling of Part 1 but I liked it any way.

    Only Italian Zombie Movie I saw was City Of The Dead by Dario Argento? Your right Tarn, Italians love Zombie Movies and so do I. Of course they did give us Dante, who wrote The Divine Comedy.
    Pst, they called it a comedy because in medieval times it had a happy ending so it was a Comedy but if it had a sad ending it would have been The Divine Tragedy. The Lusitania gets that dubious honor in my book.

  34. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,085
    George: Villisca. 1912 mass-murder-by-axe.

    http://www.crimelibrary.com/notoriou...a/1_index.html

    >The Rolling Stones wern't even worthy to collect the Beatles naval lint...

    Hmm...I never knew the Beatles were in the Navy. Hard to tell, really, when talking concert footage. The celebrated 1965 Shea Stadium film is, of course, a fraud~ the songs were re-recorded in the studio and dubbed, so Baal only knows what they actually sounded like at that stage, and the two 1966 "legit" concert films are so awful (both Tokyo Concerts were filmed. The first is wretched. The second marginally less so) that one is willing to give them the benefit of the doubt and not make the obvious joke that perhaps post-production dubbing mightn't have been a bad idea. The Let It Be concert footage is also less than legit since (surprise!) many run throughs of each live song on the Apple rooftop were filmed and then cobbled together to suggest a brief performance squelched by the uptight neighbors. The film of them performing Revolution on David Frost is also a dub (if you listen close you can hear that there are more instruments being played than there are musicians!) and so too are many of the Ed Sullivan Show performances. Their Ready Steady Go performances were dubbed. So, in terms of legit 'you are there' clips from after Feb. 1964, one is left with the two sad but well recorded films from Japan, and their Washington DC show~ all 15 minutes of it. Not really enough to judge them as a live act.

    Gimme Shelter, on the other hand, is perhaps the only intelligent concert film to emerge from those dark days. Musical quality aside, it can still hold up to repeat viewings.

    I have a perverse liking for the Animals. Even more perverse- I enjoy their 1967-'68 output.

  35. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    Hi Jim
    Granted the live experience for the Beatles became a bit pointless once screaming guttersnipes filled the arenas....

    The Tokyo shows suffered from dreadful quality audio recording...A highlight though were rare performances of 'Nowhere Man'.

    Their best live period was in Hamburg..Like the Beach Boys, they shined in the studio- not on the stage....

    As for the solo Beatles, I have seen Paul McCartney live 4 times, and he was stellar

    The Beatles 'Revolution' and 'Hey Jude' on the David Frost show both featured live vocals- but I believe it was an instrumental playback- That was common in Britian at the time, particularly on the Top Of the Pops show.
    On 'Revolution', George and Paul backed with a few 'shoobie doobies'. Curiously, some documentaries carry both performances with the live vocals replaced by the studio vocals..

    For some curious reason instrumental playbacks & lypsyncing were the norm in the 1960s. Most of the bands that appeared on American Bandstand had to lipsynch to their songs- The Grateful Dead were so disgusted by that, on a performance of 'Viola Lee Blues, Jerry Garcia kept his mouth closed for most of the song, and I believe Bob Wier strummed a broomstick, rather than a guitar...-

    One sad moment during a playback was with Pink Floyd- The great Syd Barret was so out of it on one tv spot, he just stared out into space for the whole song...
    I have to admit, I liked Mick Jagger's eye rolling on the 'Ed sullivan' show, when he had to change the lyrics of 'Lets Spend the night Together' to 'Lets spend some time together'. Too bad they didnt perform "C*cksucker Blues".

    The Doors handled their demand to censor 'Light My Fire' in an even bolder fashion- though they agreed to drop the line 'Girl we couldn't get much higher', Jim morrison sang it anyway...Sullivan was livid!


    The Beatles White Album was genius, although they erred in omitting John's 'Across the Universe' and 'Child of Nature'. Revolution # 9 was not my cup of tea- at least they didn't include 'What's the New Mary Jane'?

    The 'Get Back'/'Let it Be' sessions were a disaster, and putting the Beatles under a miscroscope, John's heroin addiction, plus Yoko's unending presense stifled creativity-
    The 'Let it Be' film has been out of print since the 1980s, and prior to his death, George Harrison suggested the master print be 'burned'.
    The 'Let it Be...naked' cd was interesting, with the removal of Phil Spector's influence....
    The Beatles peaked with Sgt Pepper- It was downhill after that....

    The Stones never did it for me- I only like their top 40 hits, that you'll find on the 'Hot Rocks' albums. I do like their early material, like 'Paint it Black', 'Mothers little Helper', 'Angie' amd 'Lady jane', but not much after 1970. To quote the great Noel Redding, "There ain't no Rolling Stones Without Brian Jones".
    They definatly went downhill after Brian died.

    "Rock and Roll Circus' was interesting to watch- a great Dec 1968 extravaganza- Jethro Tull were fantastic! I have a hunch the Stones refrained from releasing it for so many years because the Who gave a MUCH better performance than the Stones.....

    I'm with you on the Animals- a superb band.....
    Some years back Eric Burden was touring with Doors guitarist robbie Kreiger- they definatly had chemistry on stage...

    One of the most underrated bands of the 1960s was a Los Angeles band called 'Love', fronted by Arthur Lee. Love and the Doors were cobilled at various clubs on the sunset strip, and both were on the Elektra lable- The Doors would tour, but Love prefered to stay in CA- as a result, the Doors became superstars, and Love remained an underground act- BUT they developed an enormous following in Britian..Lee had the reputation of staying in his flat and smoking weed from dawn to dusk- Plus he treated his bandmates like excrement... He was invited to perform at the Montery Pop Festival, but he declined.
    I caught Love/Arthur Lee live some years back, he was amazing on stage...

    I'll agree with you on 'Gimme shelter'- The scene where Mick watched the footage of the stabbing at the Altamont show- and seeing his reaction was quite intense.....

    Was it Marty Balin of Jefferson Airplane who got punched in the face?

    The 1970 Isle of Wight music festival was even more chaotic- the 'Message to Love' film cannot be missed- Included within were some of the last appearances by Jimi Hendrix and the Doors, as well as police dogs attacking spectators,enraged fans tearing down the fences, and examples of backstage greed that makes ones skin crawl...
    There is a scene where joni Mitchell was performing, and some deranged stoner wandered on stage, seized the microphone, and declared the need to paint the walls invisible...
    Kris Kristofferson performed his 'Me & Bobby Magee', but the fights and banging on the walls were so loud, he walked offstage...
    There were a great performance by 'Taste'...Rory Gallagher was a genius...
    Sadly the film has just a brief snippet of Donovan singing 'Catch The Wind', rather than the whole thing..... I am a HUGE Donovan fan- He was on his 'Hurdy Gurdy Man' tour a few years back- I caught him live, and was left mesmerized- His song 'colours' never fails to mesmerize me...

  36. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,687
    [indent]
    quote:

    *Writer:John Clifford (screen story)
    John, how very decent of you not to brag!
    I wish I could, but I I was a little too young at that time. Otherwise I might have been able to enjoy the residuals, especially if the film was one of the Vincent Price films, which were shown a lot during the "Elvira, Mistress of the Dark" series, in the late 70s/early 80s.

    Sorry, but I was never a good writer; so much for the screenplay, nor could I share fame with another John Clifford, who was a ballerina: anyone who knows me can attest I exemplify "As graceful as the bird they call the elephant".

    [indent]
    quote:

    You've now triggered Ronnie Howard singing "Gary Indiana" on my Internal Soundtrack that is going to remain with me through my whole work day. I owe you one!
    True. My father mentioned he can only stand to see the Robert Preston film version once a year. And Ron Howard's "Winthrop" is one of my least favorite characters; he came accross more like Shirley Jones's son than her brother.
    "The Iowa Song" is my favorite tune from that musical, especially with the couple doing the American Gothic pose in the movie.

    But this has, at least, shown us that we're not "...so bygone stubborn we can stand touching noses, for a week at a time, and never see eye to eye", nor "...as cold as a falling thermometer in December, if you ask about the weather in July".

    And, NO!! our Thread theme will NOT become "...So what the heck. You're welcome. Glad to have you with us!! Even though we may not ever mention it again....".

    We'll just proclaim "You really ought to give the ET Threads a try"!

  37. #37
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    My Great Aunt Bobby my Great Uncle Arthur's wife might know the Bentlers. Our family is from Bonaparte so I know that area pretty well. I would have been born there but Bonaparte didn't have a hospital so I was born in Keosauqua instead. I know about Villisca only though stories that if you didn't say your prayers (it was an Axe) Hatchet man would get you. Scary to a six year old boy with an over active imagination. We always called it Villiansca. Pretty gruesome. I remember it now. Funny what you remember from your childhood and what you don't. Thanks for the link Jim.

  38. #38
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Villisca Ia and other things
    Talk about forgotten. At least in the area in my section of the state Southeastern Iowa. Old timers remember I few details. My mom who was raised in Iowa never heard of it. My dad knows a little. Kids know the Hatchet man story from Villisca. Some wag coined Villiansca. The Hatchet man actually goes back to the Indians but then Villisca happened and it took off again.

    Other things
    And why not give Iowa a try. Ok don't answer that.

    I love the Last Man On Earth. Trivia note George A. Romero based Night Of The Living Dead on I am Legend by Richard Matherson which is also the basis for The Last Man On Earth.

  39. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    251
    Yes, civil aviation, Edwardian/Victorian Fiction, The Rolling Stones, and men.

  40. #40
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    92
    Well, for a major portion of my life Titanic's only rival was Japan and all things Japanese, so much so that I married (but later divorced) a Japanese man. I got three phenomenal children out of that, so it worked out well enough. It's ebbed, but Japan is still intriguing as a country for me even now. Yes I am aware of Masabumi Hosono.
    In music (which is turning into a secondary topic) I enjoy the Beatles, but I am more into Yoyo Ma on the Cello, and Thelonious Monk on the piano, and Johannes Brahms as a composer. Forgive me for being so off to the rest of you!
    On the rest, I am a fan of Narnia, pandas, unicorns, orcas, mermaids, Pope Benedict XVI, and the authors Yukio Mishima, Ray Bradbury and Carson McCullers.
    Like the man said, that's my mind and I'm sticking to it.

  41. #41
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    87
    Let's see...I'm just as fanatic about Pompeii/Herculaneum as I am about Titanic. <g> Too bad there's not an ET-comparable site for that disaster.

    I'm also generally into SF&F, with my current emphasis being on Terry Pratchett's Discworld and Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar books. I also do graphic design and make (mostly adult) stationery for Incredimail. <g>

    Beyond that, civil rights and being in recovery from Catholicism....

    Luke

  42. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    2,059
    What are my other obsessions? JOHNNY DEPP!!! All the lore of 17th century pirates, Errol Flynn, Tyrone Powers, Douglas Fairbanks, et al. Also a HUGE, obsessive Beatles fan, and since I worked for the show's fan club in NY and Miami, STAR TREK (TOS). Weaker obsessions include silent movies and classic films with Bogart, John Wayne, Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn, etc. I must also be obsessed with reading because I have possibly over 3,000 books (90 of them on the subject of Titanic!) and historic costumes (studying them and making them). I guess I'm also obsessive about the Internet because I'm always online.

    I've also read up on Villisca and the Black Dahlia and Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, and other historic crimes, like the Clutters of Kansas (In Cold Blood/Capote). I've also "solved" a crime myself that I've written a book about and hope to publish one day.

    Did I mention I'm obsessed with Johnny Depp?

    Kyrila

  43. #43
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    92
    Pirates and the Titanic? That would be cool!

  44. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    2,059
    Then, Ann, I shall email you a link to my photo essay, TWO JACKS and a ROSE. You may get a kick out of it.

    Kyrila

  45. #45
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2
    I too am a Beatles fan like some others on this list and it's interesting to see the common ground we Beatle/classic liner lovers share based on their Liverpool/Hamburg seaport history. For example, I remember finding out that Pete Best was born in India and came to Liverpool via the Georgic sometime after WW2. I figured that the only right thing to do would be to go to a Beatles convention and ask Pete to sign my color photo of the Georgic "not as a former Beatle, but as a passenger on the Georgic". His response was a rather unenthusiastic sic. "Yeah, that's the boat" (which made me feel like I had completely wasted my time on this guy / who else at these stupid conventions would take the trouble to do this kind of research and establish these connections just to share space with a guy that they kicked out of the band!) However, Horst Fascher (Beatle's bodyguard during the Hamburg era and totally terrific human being) was hovering near by; he came over and said "I like boats" and basically treated me like a son for the rest of the day. He introduced me to his daughter and we talked about ships and the Hamburg waterfront circa 1960, and he tried to remember the name of a liner that I'm sure was the Hanseatic (the liner that's pictured on Hamburg postcards of that era [it's in the Anthology]). It's nice making friends in that way with someone who is totally cool like Horst (plus he had some good John Lennon stories).

    Okay, here's a challenge for someone on this list:

    While some of you may be aware that Freddie Lennon (John's dad) spent many years working as a ship's steward (some of these voyages and ship's names are cited within the various Beatle histories) . . . . .

    . . . . did you also know that Harold Harrison (George's dad) earned his living as a WHITE STAR LINE steward prior to the period where he famously drove a Liverpool bus.

    This question is "which ship(s) did Harold Harrison work on?"

    Anyone have any ideas? (I'm stumped)

    Kind regards,

    Lou

  46. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    883
    RMS Yellow Submarine-ic

    He left the service in 1936 and as he was presumably based in Liverpool he probably worked on the likes of the second Laurentic or Britannic.

    The latter was switched from Liverpool to London in 1935, so maybe he decided to call it quits on the sea after she moved.

  47. #47
    Joćo Carlos Pereira Martins
    Guest
    A passion that rivals with Titanic?! Not in a hundred years, that's for sure!

    Besides this legendary ship, I also enjoy the stories of other great steamers, like Cunard's early century superliners, battleships (mainly the ones of the Pacific War), U-Boats and Second World War. I'm really interested in first person war games and study and research about the equipment and weapons used by the various armies, the tactics, strategies and, of course, the naval engagements, though in this case I prefer the ones of World War I.

    Secondly, I have interests in biology and chemistry, I watch the BBC's documentary every week, but, as a fan of Agatha Christie's books, I try to find out things about poisons. Moreover, as many of you may know, I'm an enthusiastic anglophone and I share admiration for the British people and their history, the magnific British Empire, the Edwardian lifestyle, everything, from their food, to clothes, to manners, to the way of speaking and the big technological discoveries and advances of this marvellous time, the social and political changes in the aftermath of WWI and Modern History in general. Cinema is also one of favourite areas and I'm a regular film-goer, to watch action, war or drama films. I make an effort to keep myself updated about the latest Hollywood news, although I'm now declining the American cinema in favour of the European, Indian and Asiatic ones. Yeah, I suppose the Americans used to make better films until the seventies. Nowadays, I find a good one just from time to time. Nevertheless, it's hard to find a thing able to equall fairly to my Titanic interest,because this vessel is just fantastic, all of it. The various elements regarding its story make it one of the most interesting things on earth. The drama, the luxury, the multicultural passenger population, the different interpretations about the tragedy, the lifeboats, hundreds of people lying in the water, yelling for help, the excitement of diving to the wreck, I mean, there's nothing like Titanic, at least for me. And well, Titanic is definitely a part of my life, but I'm not a nerd, this theme doesn't control my daily routine, of course.

    Best wishes,
    Joćo

  48. #48
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9
    In addtion to the Titanic, my main passions are music (I am a local musician), Pittsburgh Steeler Football, Reading Agatha Christie, and watching old B&W movies.

  49. #49
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    58,188
    >>Pittsburgh Steeler Football<<

    You from Pittsburgh by chance? I grew up in New Stanton. While I'm not a musician, I have a taste for the classics. Anybody who thinks that classics can't "rock" has obviously never heard The 1812 Overture!

  50. #50
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    [indent]
    quote:

    In addition to the Titanic, my main passions are music (I am a local musician), Pittsburgh Steeler Football, Reading Agatha Christie, and watching old B&W movies.
    Jeff you need to meet my brother Jeff and his Steeler Horde.


  51. #51
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9
    Michael,

    I grew up in Steubenville, Ohio, which is ~40 mi due west of Pittsburgh and now reside in North Carolina. (Even though a yearly trip to go Kennywood, ..er, I mean visit family, is never missed.)

    Interesting tidbit on the classics, I attend a weekly open jam and last Wednesday one of the very talented guitarists there played the 1812 overature on an electric guitar. Was quite amazing really.

    George,

    Thats awesome. Its good to see your brother has done his civic duty to indoctrinate the young ones in the Black & Gold mystique.

    I also have the very same jersey your brother has on (With the SBXL Logo.)

  52. #52
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    58,188
    I've been to Kennywood a few times for the annual school picnic. Didn't continue the habit. The place had safety issues which Mum didn't like. Besides which, I preferred to sleep late anyway.

  53. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    271
    I love the Pittsburgh Steelers too! I grew up near Pittsburgh and being a Steeler fan is just part of life up there! (I live in SC now, courtesy of the airforce) Mike Tomlin did a pretty fair job coaching his first season this year! My favorite player is Troy Polamalu - he is just all over the place - you never know where he is going to pop up! I like this group of Steelers almost as much as the gang from the 70's

    I have been to Kenneywood numerous times also - agree about the safety issues though.

    Another obsession is Johnny Depp! I have to side with Kyrila on that one! He is such an awesome actor. I have seen all of his movies and in fact I have nearly all of them on DVD too. After seeing his latest movie - Sweeney Todd - I am convinced that man can do just about anything! plus he is sooo easy on the eye

    back to reality... I also enjoy history - I am fascinated with the Thomas Jefferson/Sally Hemmings thing. Also, things concerning JFK and Princess Diana.

    - Beth

  54. #54
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9
    Beth, I have also studied the JFK thing in great detail. Interesting stuff.

    I work with a cousin of Mike Tomlin. I think he will continue the tradition just fine. Gotta agree about Troy. Hope the front office can find some way to sign Alan Faneca. I have my doubts though.

  55. #55
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    25
    Besides the Titanic there are several other things that interest me. For the past fourty years I've been chasing trains with a camera. Lots od colour slides many not replaceable as the subject is gone.
    The men of the Doolittle Raid is another passion. These men are true heros in every way. There are now only 12 still with us.
    The USS Arizona is another important interest.
    The list could go on but these are the most interesting.

  56. #56
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Hi Jeff,

    My Brother even indoctrinated the dog in the Black and gold Mystique.

    [indent]
    quote:

    I also enjoy history - I am fascinated with the Thomas Jefferson/Sally Hemming thing. Also, things concerning JFK and Princess Diana.
    Howdy Beth,

    Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemming. Have you seen the movie Jefferson In Paris with Thandie Newton as Sally Hemming and Gwyneth Paltrow as Jefferson's daughter Patsy. It set in Paris at the beginning of the French Revolution and tells the story of Jefferson and his family including Sally Hemming. JFK- I got into the whole Kennedy Family after the movie came out.

  57. #57
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    58,188
    >>I have been to Kenneywood numerous times also - agree about the safety issues though.<<

    Saw the end result of a roller coaster accident there many moons ago. A section of the track collapsed. If you didn't let your kids near the thing, that was wise.

    I kind of preferred Idiwild Park myself. A bit pedestrian, but the roller coaster didn't come unglued on you.

  58. #58
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    271
    Hey Michael - I remember thinking how "scary" the Jack Rabbit was. It seemed like it would jump the track in several places - and as kids we were excited about that!! now I wonder if it really was supposed to jump the track or was it a disaster just waiting to happen! Also, there was a ride called the Turtle - I took my little cousin there one time (years back when he was much younger (23 now) and we rode that ride and his comment (as he was hanging on for dear life) - I thought turtles were supposed to be slow!! ha ha

    Hi George - No - I have not seen that movie - I will have to check it out and see if I can find that movie anywhere - must be an older movie maybe 90's? since Gwynneth Paltrow played his daughter. maybe I can watch it this weekend. Kennedys - Yeah - I probably have seen everymovie and nearly every documentary on the history channel of that family. Its always fascinated me - conspiracy or not? I really don't know - we may never know for sure either. If nothing else, there sure is a lot to question!

    Hey Jeff - yeah I heard about the stuff with Alan Faneca too - he has been such a steady and valued player for the Steelers for nearly 10 years now - it would be a shame for him to be gone. I also miss Joey Porter - yeah he is a hot head - but I enjoyed watching him. - b

  59. #59
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    58,188
    Beth, I barely remember either Jack Rabbit or Turtle. What I do recall about the roller coasters was that they were mighty flimsy looking affairs. They had a certain perverse appeal to my young eyes at the time...at least until I saw that one machine...I think it was The Thunderbolt...with the cars lying upside down on the ground and the damaged track from which they had fallen.

    That cured me of any such appeal, real quick!

    Their website made no mention of The Turtle, but The Jack Rabbit is still there. See http://www.kennywood.com/attractions/coasters.php

  60. #60
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,455
    For years my passion was collecting comic books- at one point I had nearly 8000 comic books-Mainly DC titles- Superman, Action Comics, all the DC mystery titles- I had complete runs of most of the DC titles back to 1955...
    I was never a Marvel comics fan...

    I'm also an avid Star Trek fan- I've always been an avid Trekker, even attending the odd convention..

  61. #61
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    525
    [indent]
    quote:

    Kennedy Family
    That reminds me of the Brian Regan skit, perhaps you've heard of it? If not, it goes a little something like this:

    John F. Kennedy said, "Do not ask what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." Robert Kennedy is credited with, "Some people look at things the way they are and ask why. I look at things that never were and ask why not? That must have been weird growing up at the dinner table, everyone speaking in flip-flops. "Do not ask if someone can pass the salt and pepper to you, ask if you can pass the salt and pepper to someone.""Some people look at creamed corn and ask why. I look at creamed corn and ask why not." Ted's like "There any more rolls?"

    For the full skit, you can look at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9ZaXEpp6EU

    Anyway, back to the topic at hand. I've had passions before (my parents would call them obsessions), but I don't think any of them have dipped as much into my pocketbook as this passion on Titanic. I have gone through a Star Wars phase, (eating, sleeping, and drinking Star Wars). I've also been interested in the major American wars, such as World War II, the American Revolution, and the Civil War. What added to that was the vacation I took with my family back east. We went to Philadelphia, looked at some Revolution sites (such as Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell). I also saw Gettysburg, went to the Smithsonian American History museum, and visited Arlington National Cemetery. It was an awesome trip for a history buff like me. But that's what I have been interested in for my whole life. Oh, and I was also interested in Titanic when I was about 11. So this is simply a resurrected love.

  62. #62
    Elissa Wendorf
    Guest
    Other passions...

    Let me say first I like the word 'passion' much more than I like the word 'obsession', which my family chooses to use. I am passionate about writing (fiction, short stories, anything that pops into my head). In fact, my mother likes to joke that I spend so much time inside my imagination that I am missing the real world.

    I also love sports (My Bruins!), rock music from the 80's (Def Leppard is my absolute favorite), and Pirates of the Caribbean. I've come to think of Pirates as my Star Trek!

  63. #63
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    67
    Yes. World War 2

  64. #64
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    264
    Chloe-Have to agree with that. Had 5 great uncles who served (2 were career men), and not a scratch on any of them despite them all seeing action. They're all gone now, and I'm the respository for all of their stories. I also serve in a reserve outfit here in CA, as a historian; guess some things you're just born to do, such as enjoy history. WILL

  65. #65
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    21
    It's classic film, fashion and photography for me!

    At a glance, this particular board is full of people with enquiring minds who have the compulsion to be absorbed by many things and to try and find out as much as they can about them. And that's a good thing!

  66. #66
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,272
    Some of my other "Obsessions" are:

    Amateur Radio Operator
    http://www.qrz.com/

    Photography (too many websites to list)

    Travel
    http://www.historic66.com/
    http://johnwpaige.com/robert/

    History (Local and otherwise) and
    Museum Buildings (Interesting Architecture)-
    In particular
    http://hallofstate.com/
    http://oldred.org/

  67. #67
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    525
    There is a category that I think I can fit all my "obsessions" into: recent historical events that "woke the world up," so to speak. The sinking of the Titanic is one of these of course. It showed man that they were not as far along at "beating the elements," if there is such a thing, It also helped make it safer for transatlantic. I think the next thing to fall into this list that I am interested in is the Holocaust, not necessarily World War II (though I am still interested in the war). I am also interested in the attack on the Twin Towers. All of these have various reasons for enrapturing my interest, but as I said, they all share a common theme.

    After thinking about it, I am also quite interested in the Revolutionary War and the American Civil War. I guess they might fall into the aforementioned category as well.

    I have a question for anyone who can answer it. Is there a message board like this one with the topic of the Holocaust? Bob, would you have any information on this subject?

  68. #68
    Holly Peterson
    Guest
    For me, Star Wars is the passion that rivals (and overshadows) that of the Titanic.

    I'm also interested in Old English and my own family history.

  69. #69
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,272
    Ben Lemmon-
    >>I have a question for anyone who can answer it. Is there a message board like this one with the topic of the Holocaust? Bob, would you have any information on this subject?<<

    I don't know if I am the "Bob" to which you are referring, :-)....but you might try contacting the following:

    http://www.dallasholocaustmuseum.org/info.html

    I haven't been there, but they are located just around the corner from Old Red.

  70. #70
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lansing, Michigan, United States
    Posts
    274
    The only interest that comes close to that of the Titanic for me is Abraham Lincoln. His life and his presidency interest me. Lincoln and Titanic have one thing in common as well. Lincoln was shot by Booth on April 14, 1865 and died on April 15. 47 years later, to the day, Titanic struck the iceberg on April 14, 1912 and sank on April 15.

  71. #71
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    1,273
    Robert: Owing to your enquiry of a Holocaust page, I wanted to alert you to a *new* book, in somewhat regards: "Album Of The Damned", Snapshots From The Third Reich (Paul Garson)
    The book contains 400 WWII photographs that were taken primarily by German soldiers, including Kreigsmariner.

    The images are particularly of everyday German life. I am certain you will express interest in the book. I too am interested in WAR, especially WWI, when many weapons were in their infancy.

    Michael Cundiff
    NV, USA

  72. #72
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    1,273
    POSTSCRIPT: Excuse me, my previous post was intended to draw attn. to Bob Lemmon.

    Michael Cundiff
    NV, USA
    .

  73. #73
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    5,337
    Interesting that you're a Lincoln enthusiast as well, Matthew - I inherited my fascination with the 16th President from my father, in a sense. My mother, knowing of his love of American history, bought him a set of the Carl Sandburg bio (Prairie Years/War Years) early in their marriage, and I started dipping into it at a young age. By the time I was nine had the nucleus of a book collection on Lincoln. My ninth birthday cake was fashioned to look like him, and there are photos of me kicking around somewhere visiting the Lincoln Memorial from seven years old to age thirty.

    I was rather pleased to note that Abbey's Bookstore, one of our better Sydney sources for historical biography, has a good many Lincoln books out in honour of the bicentennial of his birth.

  74. #74
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    I have 50 other interests besides Titanic! Sometimes I can't keep 'em all strait! The 1920's (I started Ballyhoo Jazz Topic on this board) and Renaissance and Medieval Europe and a bit of American History! Revolutionary America and France mostly! Right now I'm going through a Boleynian Phase again! Been through that about 50 times growing up. Before that it was the Lusitania! Silent Movies and Hollywood in general! How could I forget that!!!

  75. #75
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    51
    I am a writer, so the subject matter of whatever book I'm writing becomes my passion. I've found that writing a book about something is the best way to really learn it from the inside out. Then once the book is done, the passion remains.

    All this to say my passions include LEWIS AND CLARK, Anatomy, and Poetry. Especially Lewis and Clark. And now that I'm working on the Titanic book, I have dreams of Lewis and Clark as first class passengers trying to ride the mechanical camel in the gymnasium. And keeping cowardly men from the lifeboats with their flint-lock rifles.

  76. #76
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    4,566
    Probably Victorian true crime, Lizzie Borden, Maude Adams and the Victorian stage,Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,dirigibles,and costume history. No time for more.

  77. #77
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Hi Allan,

    [indent]
    quote:

    I've found that writing a book about something is the best way to really learn it from the inside out.
    How very true! I haven't written any bit I've read a ton of Historical Novels so I know what your saying on that!

    Shelly,
    I went through a Lizzie Borden phase and a Jack the Ripper phase! Alas I haven't the time for all my phases so I pace them out. Right now it's Hollywood's Victor Fleming!

  78. #78
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    525
    [indent]
    quote:

    I am a writer, so the subject matter of whatever book I'm writing becomes my passion.
    Believe it or not, I have found this out to be true for myself as well. As many on this board could verify (as I have announced it many times) I am in the process of writing a story about the Titanic. Before I started writing, I had a layman's knowledge at best about the Titanic. And while I am not quite an expert on the topic, I can say I know a bit more about the Titanic than the average person. An amusing anecdote: there is a Titanic exhibit about fifty miles from where I live. It is only temporary, so I decided to drag my family to it one week while we were all up there. My family, after they got their "passenger," asked me if they died or not. For the most part I was able to answer it. It kind of took away from the end of the exhibit, where you were able to see if your passenger lived or died. But I digress

    I am going to start working on a Holocaust novel after I finish this Titanic story. It will have some of the same characters, but the story will be told twenty-eight years later. I hope to be able to delve as fully into researching that as I have been with my Titanic research. I'm excited to begin.

    One more thing I forgot to mention that I am also duly interested in is psychology. I have been using it in my story and have researched symptoms of this certain psychological disorder. It has been quite fun.

    Out of curiosity, Allan, what is your Titanic story about?

    [indent]
    quote:

    Bob Lemmon
    It's Ben Lemmon

  79. #79
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    Alan Wolf wrote: "And now that I'm working on the Titanic book, I have dreams of Lewis and Clark as first class passengers trying to ride the mechanical camel in the gymnasium. And keeping cowardly men from the lifeboats with their flint-lock rifles."

    THERE's a time-travel idea to be tried! People from the past transported to an event not in OUR future but in THEIR future. We know what happened, and how we would have dealt with it if we could bring our technology with us. But how would Lewis & Clark, with their flint-locks, with their early 19th century perspectives and ways of doing things, have dealt with what they saw happening on this fantastic ship.

  80. #80
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    290
    My other passions: Dare I name them?

    Alan said that he learned about historical events when he wrote about them. I share that view. I wrote a short story about a young black woman 'travelling' on the Underground Railway with Harriet Tubman. To put myself into Abby's head, I read about Ms. Tubman, about other escapees, and other "abouts" to sense what sort of slave Abby might have been, what would have put her on the road, about how she would have seen Ms. Tubman, and about how Ms. Tubman would have seen her.

    I've also been enthusiastic about the Tudors. All that magnificence. All that drama. I would not have wanted to be a commoner then, because I'd prefer health, clean clothes and freedom; but if I had lived then, and wrote about it now, the book would have been stirring stuff. In some ways, it would have seemed like our present day. In others, quite different. Larger than life, perhaps. Henry VIII and Elizabeth seemed so. But I think we would have an empathy with the Tudor nobles and "gentle" folks.

  81. #81
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    1,273
    Pardon me Mr. Ben Lemmon, and however my *new* book ("Album Of The Damned") notice was intended for you. It must be residuals from my brain injury two yrs. ago. Fortunately, I did not perish as we have seen, of late, the beautiful actress died from her brain trauma. As an aside, Bob Lemmon was a hall-of-fame caliber Baseball pitcher from days gone by.

    Michael Cundiff
    NV, USA

  82. #82
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    51
    My book is a verse novel in multiple voices of 20 Titanic passengers. It also includes a series of poems in the voice of Snow the undertaker. A ship rat provides a narrative frame to the whole thing. And I mustn't leave out the voice of the existentialist iceberg speaking in blank verse. The action begins a week or so before sailing and ends as the Carpathia docks in New York. It all sounds very strange to describe, but the interwoven stories all add up to a cohesive whole. This book is in the same style and form as a book I wrote on Lewis and Clark titled NEW FOUND LAND. Most of the "poems" are really more like lyric monologues. This Titanic book, like the Lewis and Clark book, will be published by Candlewick Press. As long as I can finish it. I'm a good 100 pages in and I'm about to fire up the furnaces in boiler room number one!

  83. #83
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    1,273
    For you Lincoln buffs (myself inc.) see the latest YAHOO video..."NY tunnel may hold clues to Lincoln's assasination". And, moderators...are we veering too far North?
    However Lincoln & Titanic are somewehat associated by daies 14-15 April...

    Michael Cundiff
    NV, USA

  84. #84
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    58,188
    >>And, moderators...are we veering too far North? <<

    Since this thread is about passions/interests other then Titanic, so long as it doesn't break the rules or get too outrageous, have fun with it.

  85. #85
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    51
    I agree completely about the writing. I thought Titanic was just a sad story until, while watching Cameron's movie a few years ago, I got curious about Thomas Andrews. I researched him and didn't come up for air for about two years!

    That book is finished and in the running for Amazon's novel contest at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001UG3CKS

    I'll probably always have a strong interest in Titanic (it doesn't let go), but I've finished another novel about something completely different, and I've started a couple others. So writing is the passion. The subject makes it fun.

    Allan: Your Lewis & Clark book sounds fascinating. I've added it to my wish list on Amazon.

    Marlene

  86. #86
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    141
    other passions besides TITANIC? Vintage postcards....Vintage BARBIE AND KEN 1960-64......vintage clothing.....the 50's......40s pin ups......yellow rubber duckies......crime history......disasters......vintage hollywood......i could go on

  87. #87
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    85
    Hmmm...for me it's writing, costuming, artwork, some other historical time periods.

    Fortunately I can mix a lot of the arts with my other interests.

  88. #88
    George Lorton
    Guest
    Hello Chad and Holly!

    [indent]
    quote:

    vintage clothing.....the 50's......40s pin ups......yellow rubber duckies......crime history......disasters......vintage hollywood......i could go on
    And...
    [indent]
    quote:

    for me it's writing, costuming, artwork, some other historical time periods.
    Ditto, ditto! I've noticed that a lot folks here have common interests in some of the same things as well as Titanic!

    Oh and also one of my reasons for dropping in~
    [indent]
    quote:

    Vintage BARBIE AND KEN 1960-64.
    I got a load of more vintage dolls coming from a cousin soon! Most of it's family stuff we all pack ratted away! Seems we're very keen on keeping things in my family!

    Anyways Chad, have you ever had to do some restoration work and if so what works for you? Cost wise and that's easy to get! I'm talking basically about paint that you can use on vinyl and cleans to clean vinyl. Dirt and darkening from smoking and basic staining?

    Thanks in advance for any info! I'd really appreciate it!...

  89. #89
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    141
    the best thing to use on vintage Barbie is acrylic paints......I use the little tubes from Wal Mart.....they are usually under a $1....to clean vinyl I usually use a mechanics hand cleaner....go jo is the best....Fabric softner on the hair works best

  90. #90
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    141
    View Image

    a Barbie that my mom gave me that was in horrible shape.....a little paint and a new outfit

  91. #91
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    327
    Not as intense as the Titanic, but the last voyage of the Lusitania also fascinates me.

    Other interests include, the question of extraterrestrial life, Kennedy assassination, Martin Bormann, the life and death of Alfred Lowenstein, The era of the airships, PanAm Clippers, Mallory & Irvine's 1924 Everest expedition. the fate of Amelia Earhart, the failed Valkyrie plot to assassinate Hitler, the real story behind the Pied Piper of Hamelin etc.

  92. #92
    George Lorton
    Guest
    Thanks for the info Chad! Great fix-up job on Barbie and nice Susi Goose furniature and Premier kitchen too! I do have a SL Francie from 1966-68 that I found at a flea market that I re-rooted with black hair! I'll load a finished Photo of Francie! Before and after the re-root and first paint job which doesn't look quite right!

    View Image

    and after~

    View Image

    We call her Nightlights Francie! Her cloths are things my daughter has lying around!

  93. #93
    George Lorton
    Guest
    Hi Arun! [indent]
    quote:

    the failed Valkyrie plot to assassinate Hitler.
    That one interests me as well! I saw something about it on the History Channel recently. We have some topics on The Hindenburg Airship and some articles at Gare Maritime our sister site!

  94. #94
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    327
    The recently released Valkyrie film was well made and even Tom Cruise, whom I generally don't like, did a good job in von Stauffenberg's role. I have been involved recently in some discussion about General Erich Fellegiebel and his part in the failed plot. History has looked rather unkindly at this Communications General, some observers even quoting his supposed failure to cut all communications after the bomb went off as the prime reason why Hitler's supporters were able to rally around. But the real situation was far more complicated and Fellegiebel was stuck with a near-impossible task that evening.

  95. #95
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois, United States
    Posts
    600
    My other obsession is musical theatre (typical). I majored in it in college (not a performer anymore). I write about it, am currently writing a book on the subject.

  96. #96
    George Lorton
    Guest
    Hello Arun, I haven't seen the film yet! There was a lot of chaos and folks running around.

    [indent]
    quote:

    History has looked rather unkindly at this Communications General, some observers even quoting his supposed failure to cut all communications after the bomb went off as the prime reason why Hitler's supporters were able to rally around.
    True and at least they tried to do something to stop Hitler! A lot of folks just sat back and did nothing. I'm surprised that there weren't more assassination attempts on Hitler!

    Wasn't the British involved as well?

  97. #97
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    141
    There is a Hindenburg site site......another thing that fascinates me.....

  98. #98
    George Lorton
    Guest
    Really, do you have a link, Chad?

  99. #99
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    327
    >>>>> There is a Hindenburg site site......another thing that fascinates me.....<<<<<

    In that case, you should get The book by the Hoehlings. Fascinating. Also, HINDENBURG: AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY. That covers other airship disasters as well.

  100. #100
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    141
    oops sorry misread that.....no hindenburg site

 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •