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Women's Difficulties

This discussion on "Women's Difficulties" is in the Health Medicine and Hygiene section; Kate Phillips (2nd class) apparently conceived on board. I think so did the Bishops (1st ...

      
   
  1. #11
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    Kate Phillips (2nd class) apparently conceived on board. I think so did the Bishops (1st class). There was a thread a few years ago about babies born after the disaster, there weren't too many. Perhaps someone can find the thread or repeat the information?

    Daniel.

  2. #12
    Marykate Viola
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    You people think of everything don't you?

  3. #13
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    Just go over to the toilet paper thread, Marykate. That'll larn ya!

  4. #14
    Alyson Jones
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    The day of age back then with out small inserters and minni sanity pads.Have no idea how they cope!

    My mother in the yearly 1960's had big belts to hold there sanity pads inside,i can't imagine 50 years yearlier what they used.When women go visiting, how do they transport there sanity pads?They don't have luxury what we have today.

  5. #15
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    At the risk of contributing "too much information", in earlier years women had often used old bits of rag, though sanitary accoutrements had been introduced by 1912, this advertisement being just a few years later than the Titanic.

  6. #16
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    Also...you did not leave the house during 'that time' if you could afford not to. One took to the couch, with the swoon bottle, and offered vague excuses about "Madame being indisposed."

    One could, and did, roll up and insert rags. One also wore what would one day be called 'panties' and over them layered multi-levels of slips and underskirts to prevent embarrassing bleed-thru.

    One had a HUGE selection of patent medicines designed to ease or eliminate the symptoms. Not to be confused with 'regulators,' which were patent medicines that restored one's regular period...ie caused one to miscarry in the early stages by doses of substances like Ergotrate or Tansy.

    Which makes me laugh when I see "Country Kitchen" type restaurants that try to give a Quainte Olde Fashionede Feele to the premises by using either vintage trade cards or that ghastly "Advert Pattern" wallpaper...many of the Quainte Olde Productse featured therein are either narcotics meant to knock you out during The Time Of The Curse, or abortifacients. I'm a barrel of laughs in such settings, as I interpret the wallpaper for my always enthraled date.

  7. #17
    George L. Lorton
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    I'm a barrel of laughs in such settings, as I interpret the wallpaper for my always enthralled date.
    I bet you are at that, Mr Jim.

    If I was a lady back then I'd pray to be a lite bleeder or Marry me a rich fella so I didn't have to be up or out and about. Madame is indisposed indeed and doesn't want to be disturbed unless you want a dose of a shrew's tongue.

  8. #18
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    I think the only thing worse than that in that time period was a couple hundred years before when poor women had to hang their uh... used rags... outside to dry where all the neighbours could see!

    Now THAT would be embarrassing!!!

  9. #19
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    One REALLY begins to see this topic covered, in almost excruciating, detail, as the 1920s progressed. Adverts showed pretty flapper-types, in form fitting white gauze-over-fabric skirts that ended above the knee. No room for multiple layers of slip, and underskirt. The subtext of that image would have been lost on most men, but not on the women at whom these ads were targeted.


    But, what was milady to do in a world of mostly male pharmacists and grocers? Women were reluctant to...more or less...announce in public "I'm having my period" or "I need a dress shield" in front of an entire line of customers, to a male staff member.

    Kotex instituted an 'honor box' system, in which a cash box was built into a free-standing display. One dropped some quarters in, took one's Kotex product, and left without having had to talk with anyone at all.

    Other companies used the 'silent coupon' method:

    View Image

    but it remained a sales hinderance until self-serve chain stores began killing off neighborhood grocers and old-style pharmacies after about 1927.

  10. #20
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    Were the pad and the tampon invented before the first World War? Dress silhouettes appear, to me, to be slenderer and slenderer from 1911-12 onward. Perhaps the new, less padded and petticoat styles, made the pad and tampon necessities.
    In the depression, my mother and her sisters used rags. I did too in the '60's - my brother's old baby diapers - below the pad during heavy days.

 

 
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