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Bathing

This discussion on "Bathing" is in the Health Medicine and Hygiene section; The constabulary will be round shortly to confiscate your hard drive, Bob. Liver spray, eh? ...

      
   
  1. #21
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    The constabulary will be round shortly to confiscate your hard drive, Bob.

    Liver spray, eh? They did worry about livers then, didn't they (Andrews Liver Salts, Carter's Little Liver Pills)? I never do. Perhaps I should.

  2. #22
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    No worries, Mon - I have friends in high places at the constabulary. This one came from their hard drive.

  3. #23
    Alyson Jones
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    How about the officer's ,How many times a week did they bath?
    When my mum was young in the 1950's,they used to poor one lot of water in the bath tub and the whole family use to share that bath tub if the same water as everybody else in the family.Is that how people bathed in 1912?or maybe it was my granddad trying to keep the water bill down lol.

  4. #24
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    Back then people tended to use a bathtub only when they felt they needed to. So an office worker might take a bath once a week, while a coal miner would use the tub every day after work. As an Atlantic crossing in a fast liner took less than a week, many people on board wouldn't feel any need to take a bath at all during a voyage. That could well include the deck officers, especially the juniors who worked a gruelling schedule and when off watch their greatest need was for sleep.

    Certainly the tradition of a whole family using the same bathwater, with the younger children going in last and all together, was a common practice in working class homes in 1912 and remained so for decades to come.

  5. #25
    Alyson Jones
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    I have to have two showers a day or i can't sleep!or even if i had too share a bath i don't think i can share bath water.
    But i guess back then,they did not know other wise.
    I did heard something why people did not want to take baths much back in those days but i don't really believe it.
    Is this true-People only took a bath when they need too cause back then people thought bathing cause a diease which people die from,thats what i found out,is that what people thought back in 1912?

  6. #26
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    'Personal cleanliness' today can be an obsession of almost neurotic proportions which goes far beyond the demands of health and hygiene. I could argue that the Edwardians had their priorities right! As public health issues, the provision of clean drinking water and hygiene in the handling of food are far more important.

  7. #27
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    I'm sure you'd share bathwater if you had to, Alyson - if there was no alternative. My only stipulation would be that the cleanest person (me, since I'm not a miner or a child rolling around in mud) went first. Makes sense! My bet though, in the days when this was regularly done, is that father went first.

    And the cure for your two showers a day is for you to pay the utility bills - I've noticed that my youngest son, a martyr to modern personal hygiene, is somewhat less keen on squandering power these days, since he has to contribute. If he's in my house, I can hear the electric shower going for ages. I understand that, at his home, his ablutions are much brisker.

    I know the Elizabethans thought too much bathing was bad for the health, but I doubt anyone in 1912 thought so. They would have tried to balance opportunity against necessity, I'd have thought.

  8. #28
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    "Father went first" - of course! Even if he was a miner, because he wouldn't have been working on the family bath day (generally Sunday). As for the unhealthy aspect of bathing, that could have had some validity in winter time in the days before central heating, when being cold and wet at the same time could be dangerous. That's why the tin bath was generally hauled in front of the fireplace in the kitchen or back parlour.

  9. #29
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    The men who loaded the liners with coal sometimes slept in crude sleeping bags until the task was done.

    I'm old enough, and was brought up poor enough, to remember the joys of the old chip heater. One reason for people not being eager for a bath is that it was so much trouble. Read Pygmalion, which was written in Titanic's time, and note Eliza's amazement at how easily the upper classes could have a bath.

    Now we are so keen on being clean that we are possibly harming out immune systems by not exposing them to what my mother used to call 'good, clean dirt'.
    Dave Gittins
    Titanic: Monument and Warning.
    http://titanicebook.com/Book.html

  10. #30
    Alyson Jones
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    Dave i think i no what you mean.That in there day the baths did not have taps join to the bath,and i heard it took some one ages to just fill the bath,is that what you meant!

    Monica,you're son sounds like my bro lol and if i have to share water i probelry choose not to have one, i am so fuzzy when it comes to clean water,but then again you're right if i really had to share bath water,i would do my darndest to get in there first.

    Bob- Most times the father went first alot of times but there was some women that were more dominate then there husbands and the women got the first bath *smart women*

 

 
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