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Fitness

This discussion on "Fitness" is in the Health Medicine and Hygiene section; Well Cook and I could win the pie eating contest! Wanna bet?...

      
   
  1. #11
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    Well Cook and I could win the pie eating contest!

    Wanna bet?


  2. #12
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    Here's another thought: most of the pictures taken, at the ship's gymnasium, showed most people in their full suits: shirt and tie, coat, women's full dress.
    These must have been "photo moments", both on the Titanic and the Queen Mary (part of the "Sunday On the Ship With Ron" series).
    That's one thing you'll never see, now. I, too, am serious about working out, and nobody at the local Ballys centers would consider working out unless they changed into their workout clothes.

    Of course, many of the entrees that we might indulge in, today, were probably not available in 1912. However, that does not mean that what we, today, consider unhealthy was not deemed acceptable in the early part of the 20th century.
    What was the average life span?

    BTW, Kris, when I was in 6th grade, 1975-1976, we had both Boy's and Girl's P.E. classes. That was the last year, as our teachers informed us that the next year the classes would be co-ed, per Title IX.

    Now, "for the final question", when will Mark, Geoff, and Pat head to the finals of the pie eating contest.

    John Clifford

  3. #13
    Pat Cook
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    Wait - does that mean I have to get up?!

  4. #14
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    Good stuff Kris! Let me slice a hefty wedge of treacle tart with cream for the boys and then we can chat about sneakers- or "trainers" as our British cousins will have it. I was amazed at all the Olympic records set considering the quality of the footwear as it appeared in Chariots of Fire, the film about Eric Liddle. Got me to thinking about sneakers. A rubber-heeled shoe was patented in 1899 by Irish-American, Humphrey O'Sullivan. The "plimsoll" shoe appeared about 1892 when the nine major American rubber companies formed a conglomerate called U.S. Rubber Co.-of which Goodyear was the frontrunner. Goodyear had been around making rubberized ground sheets during the Civil War- and in 1892 Charlie Goodyear came out with the vulcanization process whereby rubber could be melded onto canvas or cloth. So from 1892-1913 over 30 brands came out under various names, of rubber footwear. Looking for a catchy name, PEDS was considered, being the Latin for "foot" but we all know what PEDS are- the name was taken by a hoisery company! So, in 1916 the shoes became KEDS. The word "sneaker" was coined in 1917 by Henry McKinney, an advertising agent, because that was the stealthy sound made by the sneaky rubber soles. In 1979 Stride Rite Co. bought out KEDS- and ther rest is history. More pie anyone?

  5. #15
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    A delightful series of photographs of bathing beauties and commentary on women's athleticism from 1892-1920, design and fabric of swimsuits and bathing footwear, and a detailed article can be found on the Victoriana.com site at
    http://www.victoriana.com/library/Beach/suit-3.htm
    Hope this is not too thrilling for you fellas! Lots of shapely ankles are exposed!

  6. #16
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    Shelley-
    A thing about rubber-soled shoes: in Gimbel's (Spring 1915) advertised were White Canvas Oxford's;
    "Rubber soles. A shoe suitable for tennis, yachting, country or beach wear. The toe is not extreme, allowing perfect freedom for the foot. Sizes, 6 to 10. Widths, D and E. $1.25 pair."

    Now, these shoes look like regular Oxfords, but with sole/heel in one piece. The laces: rather wide, "ribbon" style.

    Oh! BTW- "Arch Supports" were sold on page 155!

    Kris

  7. #17
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    Kris:

    Not to forget the "Coney Island" photographs of your aforemention were of the period when another ocean menace was stalking the Jersey Shores...and some lesser known rivers.

    A furthur inclusion fitted into the OLYMPIC CLASS Liner (SEE: New York Times review - "OLYMPIC is like a city".), was to have been an *ice* skating lane...perhaps a section of promenade
    cordoned off?

    After TITANIC's fateful encounter with *ice*, certainly those amended plans were abruptly ended.

    Michael A. Cundiff
    USA

  8. #18
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    Michael-

    The other menace you speak of, would that be the garbage, sewage, etc. dumped in there? If so, yes...I understand why there would be little swimming sport happening. Heck- I'd risk SHARKS than...the other stuff!

    Kris

  9. #19
    Bob Cruise
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    Shelley: treacle tart with cream??? Sounds deliciously inviting. Does it come replete with a storytelling dormouse?

    Kris: I believe it's called "the black goo". (Didn't Steven King write a story about it? I think it made an appearance in the movie "Creepshow II". I know, for sure, that I once read something about it in an Alfred Hitchcock horror anthology.)



  10. #20
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    Just don't take the new(ish) book about the 1916 New Jersey attacks, Close to Shore, too seriously...although the author makes a great show of seeing the events in the context of the era (lots of material on how swimming was viewed in America during the Gilded Age that has some bearing on this thread) etc, I found it a hopeless mismash of fact, fiction and speculation masquerading as non-fiction. It seemed to be attempting an approach along the lines of The Perfect Storm, but missed the mark utterly. I've seldom found a book so utterly irritating.

    The final kicker was his decision to go virtually without question with the theory that all the attacks were the work of a single, rogue Great White. He makes only passing, slighting reference to the recent work by Ellis and McCosker (among the most prominent and respected of Great White shark researchers), who posit the theory - which I'm inclined to favour - that at least some of the attacks were caused by another species, most probably a Bull Shark. But then, this wouldn't fit with the sensationalistic, simplistic narrative of the story...a prototype Jaws, one shark terrorising a community.

 

 
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