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Pregnancy

This discussion on "Pregnancy" is in the Health Medicine and Hygiene section; >>They - er - weren't designed to be taken orally.<< Mmmmmm...yeah...got it. >>They were marketed ...

      
   
  1. #11
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    >>They - er - weren't designed to be taken orally.<<

    Mmmmmm...yeah...got it.

    >>They were marketed in England from the 1880s right up until the 1940s, and apparently were not entirely ineffective.<<

    As a contraceptive, I would think not. The quinine would have been useful for dealing with malaria, but not if used in the manner prescribed by the maker.

  2. #12
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    Sometimes Grannie knows best, Mike. Mr Rendell was on the right track, even if he didn't have the resources to arrive at the ideal formulation. Modern research has led to the production of spermicidal creams based on vegetable oils and quinine hydrochloride that are regarded as not only safer but also often more effective than the synthetic and hormone-based products of the more recent past.

  3. #13
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    Re therapeutics, Granny also used to say "If it hurts, it's doing you good." I'm not altogether sure she was right about that, though.... I'm glad that my parents rejected the idea of a mustard poultice for my chest in favour of antibiotics when I was 4. But, of course, there were no antibiotics when she was raising her 7.

  4. #14
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    And of course "the worse the taste, the more good it will do ya". In a Great War documentary on TV last week, an old soldier remarked that the castor oil supplied for engine lubrication was great for dealing with cases of constipation, on those rare occasions when the prospect of 'going over the top' didn't get the job done. Forty years later we were still suffering the same treatment, though our supply came in a bottle from the pharmacy rather than from a 2-gallon can of Castrol.
    .

  5. #15
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    Another fine motto to live by, Bob. He must have been a very old soldier indeed - not that extraordinary 108-year old, by any chance, who looks and sounds like a sprightly 80-year old? I saw him last week on TV, and instantly felt about 109 myself. If indeed, "the worse the taste, the more good it will do ya", then I suppose a diet of whisky and Fishermen's Friends should see me into a fine old age.

  6. #16
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    Yes, the old bloke was well over 100, but looked no older than I do (ie about 95). Here's what was needed in the well-stocked family medicine cabinet in 1839. No Trades Description Act in those days, so they could get away with advertising 'Tasteless Castor Oil'. And bad copywriting - Grannie would want to read that the stuff tasted bleedin' awful. Their leeches were good value at two bob a dozen, but sixpence a pint for Black Draught was daylight robbery, when any pub would serve you a pint of Guinness for twopence.



  7. #17
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    How did you keep the leeches alive with tails wagging, and able to do the business?
    Am slightly worried about the sweet spirits of nitre... not to mention the laudanum. It was fairly exciting stuff in the medicine cabinet in those days. Mine seems very boring by comparison.

  8. #18
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    I don't need to remind you that attitudes to big families were different then. I have a rather poignant letter from my gr-grandmother to my grandmother which says "Be kind to your children dear and if they live, they will look after you when you get old". They were seen as an insurance against destitution in old age.

  9. #19
    Noel F.Jones
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    "They - er - weren't designed to be taken orally. They were marketed in England from the 1880s right up until the 1940s, and apparently were not entirely ineffective."

    Surely they would be entirely effective if clasped between the knees at the appropriate time?

    I'm out of here.....

  10. #20
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    I told my sons today about the insurance against destitution in old age idea, Ernie. They smiled.... and asked for some sums to be deposited in their bank accounts. Better off, maybe, having girls? My 93-year old father certainly thinks so, and so does my 97-year old mother.

    Rendell's were marketed beyond the 1940s - no matter what anyone says. I'm sure I remember selling them in my father's pharmacy into the early 1960s, and I was only a gawky kid at the time. People wrestled with the notion of buying such things off a (just) teenager, or leaving on a Friday evening without their requisites....

    Noel, you might just be right.

 

 
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