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Drug Addictions of the Times

This discussion on "Drug Addictions of the Times" is in the Health Medicine and Hygiene section; Hi - I'm working on a research paper on drug addictions during the Edwardian Era. ...

      
   
  1. #1
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    Hi - I'm working on a research paper on drug addictions during the Edwardian Era. I have only been able to find addictions to laudanum, chloral, "Orangine", opium/morphines and cocaine during this era. Were there any other "popularized" recreational drugs common in this time period??

    Thank you for any help you can provide!

    -Katrina L. Lilly

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    I have only been able to find addictions to laudanum, chloral, "Orangine", opium/morphines and cocaine during this era.
    Only? Seems quite enough, especially if you add in booze and tobacco, though I can see why you wouldn't. Did they still use Belladonna then, or was that from an earlier age? That was for cosmetic reasons, I understand, but it was still damaging and a psychological 'addiction' in its way. Bob Godfrey is the man for this - I'll see if I can get his attention for you.

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    Did somebody call? (emerges slowly from state of drug-induced euphoria). I'd agree with Monica that the ever-popular ethanol wins hands down as chief cause of personal, social and economic problems, then as now. But otherwise you have most of the usual suspects in the line-up. Chloral hydrate, ether and chloroform all had their devotees. 'Orangine' was just one of many mild analgesics and headache cures which contained acetanilid, so you could extend the range there.
    .

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    Hi Bob,

    Do you know if Bromo-Seltzer (another cure for headaches) was around at that time?

    Best regards,

    Jason
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

  5. #5
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    It was indeed, Jason, (since the 1880s) and it did contain acetanilid.

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    Thanks for that Bob, cheers! I've got an old Bromo-Seltzer cobalt blue bottle, which even says on the bottom that it was used just for that.

    Best regards,

    Jason
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

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    Trivia time. I can't think of a Titanic connection, Jason, but both your bottle and its contents were made by companies owned by Isaac Emerson, whose daughter Margaret was widowed when her husband Alfred Vanderbilt went down with the Lusitania.

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    That's right Bob, Colleen mentioned that to me a few weeks ago. It's a very interesting connection.
    Jason D. Tiller
    "To be happy is to be contented in your own mind"...Harold Godfrey Lowe
    43° 44' 01" N, 79° 24' 16"W
    Author of an upcoming biography on Arthur G. Peuchen

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    Another question: How many of those drugs were common prescribed for various ailments?

    In retrospect, when Madeline Astor died, in 1940, it was thought that she committed suicide, but it might have been a reaction to prescriptives used, especially if taken while consuming alcohol.

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    When I used to help out in my father's pharmacy as a teenager, an old lady used to sidle in about twice a day and buy a couple of bottles of Gees Linctus, a cough medicine which contains morphine. So we reckoned she was on about 4 bottles a day, and there was another chemist in the town as well which she could also go to. My father eventually realized what was going on and refused to sell her any more. Poor old thing got into a dreadful state. Having had Gees Linctus a couple of times, I have to say it seems a fairly unpleasant way to get your morphine, but I suppose you don't notice after a while.

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    John: You didn't need a prescription for these products, they could be bought over the counter. At the height of the Edwardian period the 'patent medicine' business was worth about $100m a year in the US alone. Products like 'Mrs Winslow's Soothing Syrup' provided babies with their first taste of morphine, and others like 'Birney's Catarrh Cure' were convenient sources of cocaine. These brands were hugely popular, as were the pain relievers based on acetanilid, which were not only addictive but toxic in quite small overdose levels, especially when taken at the same time as alcohol.

    In the US the 1906 Food and Drugs Act did not restrict the availability of such products, but did at least demand that there should be a clear display on the container of the amounts of any included alcohol, morphine, opium, cocaine, heroin, eucaine, chloroform, cannabis, chloral hydrate, or acetanilid. Monica's recollection demonstrates that things hadn't changed entirely for the better a half century later.
    .

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    In fact, rather more than a half century later (sorry. Mon! )

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    You might be surprised to learn that ingesting Vick's Vaporub is also a cheap high used by the older generations. Not sure what the active ingredient is that would cause an addiction, but some of my elderly patients were really into it. This was in Arkansas, Tennessee and Kentucky, so I don't know how wide-spread it was in use.

    Kyrila

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    That would be the nutmeg oil, which contains the active ingredient elemicin. This is a relative (somewhat far removed) of mescaline and can produce a very mild high. The pure chemical can provide hallucinations (and a hangover). Here in the UK, at retirement resorts like Frinton-on-Sea, the few young people in the population fear to walk the streets for fear of marauding gangs of elderly Vicks Vaporub fiends demanding money to feed their habit.
    .

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    Does Kyrila mean actually eating Vick's Vaporub?
    Aaarrrgh! At any rate, at least nobody could have been into glue-sniffing in 1912 as, if my childhood memories serve me right (careful Bob...) the alternatives in our household were Gloy, Araldite or fishglue, and nobody in their right mind could have borne to sniff those. There again, though, glue-sniffers often aren't in their right minds?

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    Oh - forgot. I have found some mention of belladonna (deadly nightshade) being abused orally over the centuries. It is used in small quantities in some OTC medicines, and over-dosing can give a flying sensation. However, this is usually accompanied by other rather unpleasant physical symptoms, so it is not generally considered a drug of abuse. Anyone tough enough to eat Vick's Vaporub might be up for it though....

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    Well, ladies, we've all done the Titanic menu, that's old hat. Are you up for an evening of Titanic vice? Bass Export, Capstan Full Strength, Bromo-Seltzer, Gees Linctus, Vicks Vaporub and a game of Happy Families at a penny a hand - the possibilities are endless, and all legal!

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    You've forgotten the belladonna. If we can't find the catarrgh (spelling?) cure with it in, we could smoke the leaves apparently. Obviously that's what Rose was putting in her fags. The huge pupils in the drawing episode, and the "I'm flying!" scene. She was taking a very lethal chance indeed - it's not called deadly nightshade for nothing.
    I think I'd prefer to gamble at Cheat rather than Happy Families - more fun.

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    And everybody please remember good old Coca-Cola, which was the Real Thing back then - actual cocoa leaves used in the mix.

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    I didn't forget the bella donna. In fact, I invited two of you! You are right, however, that Rose must have been on Nightshade. The alkaloids thus ingested produce a very specific hallucination of floating or flying - it's thought that's how 'witches' traditionally got airborne rather than by use of a broomstick! Just in case, though, and in the interest of historical research, next time I view the film I'm going to have a good look at her chest for any signs of Vaporub.
    .

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    Cocoa leaves, Lee? Now that's really living dangerously - death by chocolate. But that reminds me of something. Legend has it that the designer of the famous bottle was looking through a book of alphabetically-arranged botanical drawings, seeking inspiration for a suitable shape. He checked out the cola nut and wasn't impressed, then while backtracking for the coca leaf he saw a pic of the cocoa bean and the rest is history (or myth, as the case may be). The amount of cocaine in Coca Cola, by the way, was never more than a trace and eventually (before it disappeared completely) it was down to one part in fifty million.
    .

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    I didn't forget the bella donna. In fact, I invited two of you!
    Bob Godfrey, are you smooth or what? But hang on, I'm in a muddle - I though Coca-Cola was cocaine not cocoa. Or is it the same? Forgive me, I am such an ignoramus concerning these things (preening, whilst reaching for another Benson & Hedges...)

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    No mystery - the magic ingredient was the coca leaf. Lee's 'cocoa' was a typo (I think!). The only reference I've ever seen to cocoa and coca cola together is in the recipe for 'Coca Cola chocolate fudge cake'. Don't even look that up - you might be tempted.

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    You're right, cocaine is refined from the leaves of the coco plant - first time I knew that. (Blushes). I guess the names caused the confusion.

    Apparently, the Coke bottle was actually formed in the shape of the coca pod. Good catch!

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    Nearly there. Just to get those confusing names straight - the brand name came from two of the original ingredients, the coca leaf and the cola nut. The bottle shape came from the cocoa pod (not from the beans inside - my mistake!).

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    According to This Article on Snopes.com, "Coca-Cola
    was named back in 1885 for its two "medicinal" ingredients: extract of coca leaves and kola nuts. Just how much cocaine was originally in the formulation is hard to determine, but the drink undeniably contained some cocaine in its early days." It also points out that by 1902, what was left in the formula amounted to little more then 1/400th of a gram per ounce of syrup. Mix this in with carbonated water and what you have left wouldn't be sufficient to have any sort of real effect. Compared to other patent medicines of the time, Coca-Cola was mild stuff.

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    Katrina:
    It would be a shame to forget about Absinthe, which is/was a liquor based on wormwood extract and mildly poisonous. It was all the rage in Parisian society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but it's illegal in most countries now. At its height, it was probably more popular than cocaine.
    Regards,

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    Ah, Absinthe...which is making a comeback in Europe, albeit not quite the same as it was in its decadent hey-day. I blame a certain boisterous night I spent in Dublin on its effects (nothing to do with the pints of Guinness, of course). Such a pretty drink...such a vile taste! I have a vintage cocktail book with quite a few Absinthe based drinks - keep meaning to get another bottle and try a few.

    Then there are the great Edwardian and Victorian ads for the medicinal properties of cannibis...there are some lovely illustrations advocating the cure-all properties of 'marijuana cigarettes' (and with their heavy lidded eyes and a joint in their pretty pursed little lips, the women in these ads certainly look like stoners).

    Here's a 'medicinal cannabis picture gallery', with lots of links to period bottles:

    http://www.conquestdesign.com/uncler/html/CoughSyrup/

    Links to some ads here for cannabis - that well known cough and flu cure:
    http://www.conquestdesign.com/uncler...Ads/index.html

    There are quite a few good links on the site regarding quakish and other uses cannibas has been put to.

    No wonder Victorian ladies spent so much time languishing on the settee, given the laudanum they got through! Poor old Elizabeth Siddal - was it suicide or accidental overdose? Given the quantities she was going through when she o.d.'d, and the lack of standardised measuring of the doses, I wouldn't be surprised if it was the later.

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    Absinthe is making a comeback (minus the hallucinagenic wormwood oil) in Europe, thanks to the Jack the Ripper film "From Hell." The lead actor has been known to send cases of the stuff to his friends. However, it's still not legally available in America (except online overseas sales). It's become the hottest imbibe among the tinseltown set when they're in Europe.

    Kyrila

    (I can just hear Bob Godfrey press the reply button now.)

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    Ahhh...that's right - you're a Johnny Depp fan, aren't you, Kyrila? I've no doubt that the star of From Hell did manage to help it's popularity along, but it was taking off in London before the film (which wasn't really influential in the UK). Absinthe also had a bit of a starring role in Moulin Rouge and a cameo in Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula. Its resurgance in popularity in the UK had a lot to do with a very canny importer in the 90s realising that - unlike countries such as France that had pretty much banned it by 1915 - it was never banned in the UK. Nor was it banned in Spain or Portugal, where it continued to be made. European Union regulations recently enabled wider distribution, but the EU keeps close tabs on the level of the psychoactive compound thujone. Thujone is a natural oil of wormwood, often concentrated in the stem. Most of it is removed in the distillation process. It is structurally close to THC and has been credited with hallucinogenic properties, one of the reasons it was banned early in the 20th Century, but there have been no recent scientific studies into claims about its dangers as a drink besides its high alcohol content. Thujone is linked with episodes of epilepsy, but only in doses far higher than in normal drinking patterns.

    Another visit from the green fairy, anyone?

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    What she said. (Knew I could count on you, Inger!)

    Kyrila

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    And all I was going to say was that absinthe makes the heart grow fonder.

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    You'd need to be a movie star to afford the stuff. The bottle I saw recently was made somewhere in the Balkans and cost £40 a bottle. I gazed upon it in awe. It came with a leaflet giving tiresomely complicated instructions on how to drink it - something about fiddling around with sugar lumps and matches I think - so what with that and the price, I just bought a bottle of hock. Dull, aren't I? Nervous of it, too, having read far too much Balzac at an impressionable age.

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    Lol, Kyrila! I am far too fond of decadent vices and things like the pretty green liquid that tastes so vile (can't wait to dig into the old Savoy cocktail book for those softening influences). Monica is quite right, though - it is outrageously expensive, and when given the choice between that and a bottle of Bacardi spice rum, yo-ho-ho usually won out.

    We were given a lovely range of schnappes by Swedish relatives last Christmas, including some with wormwood as an ingredient. The facial expressions as the shots were downed were priceless...

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    I can see Inger's biography now.
    "Inger Sheil: her Life, her Works, her Cocktail Recipes" .....

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    Lol! I believe we all have something to contribute to the betterment of the world...in my case, it's a collection of cocktail recipes, both old and new. For example, the tIng-a-ling...a popular among my mates.

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    I found Absinthe for sale in a liquor store in Mystic CT this summer so it can be found here in the US.

    I was tempted to purchase it ($45 if I recall) but the little booklet with instructions on the art of "indulging" made me weary of the purchase!

    I declined knowing that I had gone there on a research trip and wanted to come home with more than just a hangover! LOL!

    Rosanne MacIntyre

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    Well, it didn't look that complicated in the movie. "Abberline" put a few drops of liquid over the sugar cube, put in a spoon and held it over a kerosene lamp flame for a moment until it began to melt, then he dropped it in the absinthe and stirred it up then drank it all down in one gulp.

    Kind of reminds me of Saurian brandy - or as Mr. Scott would say, "It's green!"

    Kyrila

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    Here's a decent guide to the ways in which you can prepare Absinthe:

    http://www.absinthebuyersguide.com/tasting.html

    I'm a lazy sod and have mostly drunk it neat, although I'm amused by the line in the article that suggests that most Absinthe these is 'already sweet', so you can dispense with the sugar cube. I've never really thought of it as 'sweet'!

    It's interesting that the buyer's guide on that site suggests that it is not legal to buy Absinthe in the US (although it is not a controlled substance like marijuana or cocaine). This site has some comments about its legal status in the US and how the laws may be interpreted:

    http://www.fact-index.com/a/ab/absinthe.html

    Here's a more comprehensive site on its legal status in the US and other countries:
    http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/absi...nthe_law.shtml

    That site also links to a more specific answer to the question of whather it's legal to import Absinthe into the US:
    http://www.erowid.org/ask/ask.cgi?ID=2693

    A lot of the legality debate centres around the levels of thujone (and if you want the original, real thujone-laden deal, you're best off buying it from the Czechs!).

    I'm happy to note that Absinthe was shifted from the prohited list to the restricted list in Oz in the year 2000...have discussed getting around to buying a bottle from one of the specially licenesed dealers with a few mates who haven't tried it yet.

    By the way, a small disclaimer: my posts are *not* intended to advocate excess drinking or experimentation with Absinthe. I think it's important to note that the real properties of this drink are obscured by a lot of romanticism and mythology. The hallucinogenic properties are hotly debated, and may well not exist at all. The real hazards lie in the fact that this is a *very* potent drink (nearly 70% alcohol), and should be treated with the necessary respect.

  40. #40
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    I bought a book of cocktail recipes in the 1980s. Three other girls and I spent the summer experimenting on Wednesday afternoons. Their partners got a bit fed-up with having to fetch the nearly-comatose participants home, but it was fun while it lasted. And rather expensive. Shortly afterwards we all became pregnant, so that was the end of that. I don't think the two events were related. I've never drunk a cocktail since. Hmmmm ..... I do recall a particularly nice strawberry daquiri....

  41. #41
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    Forgive the intrusion people but I am assisting Katrina. There is a historical book published by the Southampton author - John G. Avery. The subject concern is called - The Cholear Years.

    (In my opinion this is a damn good book). The climax of this decease in Britain alone had reached epidemic preporotions during the late 1890's.

    The index does list many good reference sources which could come useful at a later stage. To obtain a copy your can write directly to the publishers who are based on the other side of Southampton.


    Publishers:-

    Ashford Press
    Bottings Industrial Estate
    Hilldons Road
    Curdridge
    Nr Botley
    Hampshire.

    Another point I would to make. Once Cholera had nearly fizzled out of society there was another lurking on the horizon - Consumptions - commonly know today as Tuberculosis.

    Katrina perhaps you need to add T.B on your list as well.

    Hope this helps.

    A. W.

  42. #42
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    Hallo Andrew - I think Katrina is after information on drug addictions during the Edwardian era rather than information on diseases of the age. She mentioned chloral - this is 'chloral hydrate' rather than the disease cholera. 'Chloral hydrate' is a very old synthesised drug that first made its appearance in 1832. It's a hypnotic depressant - in other words, it is sleep inducing. When mixed with alcohol it becomes the notorious 'knockout drops' or 'Micky Finn'.

    Most of the drugs mentioned in this thread were, at least originally, intended to be used medicinally - even Absinthe.

    Cholera was indeed a terrible disease - one of the saddest stories in my family tree involved my great-great aunt, who lost her only beloved daughter in a cholera epidemic in Oberon at the turn of last century. My gg aunt lived to be a hair short of 100, but grieved the loss of that baby for the rest of her life. Tuberculosis was also a problem, and was so at least as long as cholera (several of the Brontes succumbed to this disease).

    I owe you a couple of emails, btw, and will try to send them this week (I've been very busy at work and haven't had a chance to delve into my correspondence).

    Monica, you're recounting a very familiar scenario - the 'gurrrrls' down here are very fond of our cocktail weekends!

  43. #43
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    Yes, Inger, your correct.

    Yours truly wasn't wearing his glasses as usual. A habit I got to get into or else one day, I am going to make one hell of a blunder.

    Just a thought though.

    A.W.

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    I've often thought of what percentage of people on the Titanic must have had substance abuse problems. Statistically, quite a few would have. Of course, 1912 was before the advent of AA and the recognition of alcoholism and addiction as a disease. I've been hesitant to raise the subject, since it is a sensitive one and we don't have much to go on but heresay. But since the thread is here already...

    Robert Daniel's death certificate lists cause of death as cirrhosis of the liver. This only INDICATES a drinking problem. Madeleine Astor's tumultuous personal life and pretty-well-documented death from an overdose also indicates a problem. Zette Baxter's life was touched by alcoholism, in that her husband suffered from it, leading to the breakup of the marriage and his career.

    The reason I bring this up is because, to me, alcoholism is a health issue and not a moral one, and it is not being gossipy or malicious to discuss whether someone suffered from it.

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    I've been searching the archives to find out which crewmember it was who by some accounts was a crossdresser, by others was definitely not, but who by all accounts was a "drunkard".

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    >>I've often thought of what percentage of people on the Titanic must have had substance abuse problems. Statistically, quite a few would have. <<

    And you're probably right. Given the sort of things that were in patent medicines at the time, it would be all too easy to get hooked and not even know it until it was way to late. Hardly surprising when you realized a lot of these preperations were loaded with opiates, alcohol, organophosphates (The same stuff used in military nerve gasses!) and God alone knew what else. All of this was readily available over the counter or from the medicine wagon.

    Some may find This Wikpedia Entry to be of some interest.

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    Amazing more people didn't kill themselves with laudanum, morphine, codeine and even Lydia Pinkham's Medicinal Compound had a high alcohol content. Children's teething and cough mixtures were loaded with narcotics-poor kid stopped crying because he was knocked out in a sleep stupor. Coca-Cola at one time, so it is rumored had a touch of cocaine. I collect Ayers sarsparilla and patent medicine memorabilia,- Lowell, Massachusetts being Patent Medicine capital of the nation. Also Hoyt's is from Lowell, a textile city. Hoyt's made patent medicine but is famous for their German Cologne. Here are some advertising cards for their children's cherry cough syrup and ague cure. Who knows what was in them- Ayers made a bundle.There is a great book about the patent medicine tycoons called The Sarsparilla Kings by Scott Stewart if you can find a copy.



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    ......And then there was Sherlock Holmes and his "Seven Per Cent Solution"......

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    >>laudanum<<

    And wasn't this stuff Queen Victoria's drug of choice?

  50. #50
    Joćo Carlos Pereira Martins
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    Hey everyone!

    I was searching about drug abuse in the Edwardian period and I found out that heroine was also quite popular by this time. And was there cases of addiction to pills, like narcotics or something else? I would be very aprecciated if someone had further information about the topic.

    Best,JC

  51. #51
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    Pills indeed!!!! A lot of over the counter pills and 'Tonics' had Morphine, Opium and other assorted goodies in them that would make your head spin. I bet some of 'em really packed a kick.

    Child:"I feel all better now Momma". The Mother would probably take a nip herself. Nursing was stressful and she couldn't afford to get sick. She had all that back breaking house work to do. She got the medicine from the Pharmacy. How could it be bad? My Sister's a Pharmacist. She could probably go on and on about what they put in pills back in the good ole' days.

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    James Maybrick, one time Jack the Ripper suspect, was addicted to Arsenic.

  53. #53
    George L. Lorton
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    Hi Paul-

    Arsenic!!! Thats playing with fire.

  54. #54
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    >>Arsenic!!! Thats playing with fire.<<

    So was playing around with the patent medicines of the era, which commonly had any number of questionable ingrediants, including heavy metals such as murcury. This Wikipedia Entry speaks to this in the Unintentional Poisoning section while This Link goes to an entry discussing patent medicines. As always, you need to be cautious with the information on Wikipedia, but you can use it as a starting point for further research.

  55. #55
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    The most well-known victim of drug abuse around this time was that of revue-star, party-girl and proto-flapper, Billie Carleton. It was of her that the 'Tatler' wrote:

    'She has cleverness, temperament and charm. Not enough of the first, and perhaps too much of the latter.'

    This verdict was proved tragically right. Carleton died of an over-dose of either cocaine or heroin (I don't recall which) after the Victory Ball, held at the Royal Albert Hall in London, on the night on 27th November, 1918. Her death in the wee small hours really served to high-light how prevalent the recreational use of drugs had become in the racier sections of Society during the Great War. Lady Diana Cooper, nee Manners, regularly took morphine in an attempt to numb the pain of the multiple losses of her male friends and contemporaries in action. And, from what I gather, such a habit was by no means unusual, either.

    I noticed, George, that you've started a 'Jazz Age' thread to run parallel to our exploration of the Belle Epoque and the Edwardian Era. Yet the premature demise of the lovely Miss Carleton demonstrates that the traits we most associate with the Roaring Twenties really had their roots in the previous decade.

  56. #56
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    True Martin,

    My thread I started is really the fruition of the Gilded Age. Most of the traits of the Roaring 20's already in Society. That's one of the reasons I called the thread All Roads Lead to Ballyhoo. A lot of the threads we discuss had the collimation in the Jazz Age.

    Plus a lot of the time discussions move towards the Jazz Age in other threads in on way or another and beyond. So I thought to give all us Sheiks and Sheba's a place to jazz it up.

  57. #57
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    She stands there sniffin' with her nose all sore
    Doctor says he wont sell her more
    says "Coke's for horses not woman or men."
    Doc says it'll kill 'er he but he dont say when.
    So we wait a while and whiff our good cocaine.

    (Cocaine Blues, Post-1900)

    Early one morning I was making my rounds.
    Took a shot of cocaine then I shot my woman down.
    Went right home and fell into bed
    tucked my loving .44 beneath my head.

    Woke up next morning and I grabbed my gun
    took a shot of cocaine and I away I run.
    Made a good run, but I went too slow-
    law overtook me down in Juarez, Mexico.
    (Cocaine Blues, version 2)

    I'm a ding-dong daddy, babe, liquor is my racket.
    Lots of times when things get slow I deal in other traffic.
    I can sell you morphine, I can sell you "snow."
    Take a quick shot and you're rarin' to go.
    I'm a ding-dong daddy, babe, you ought-a see me do my stuff.

    (Believe it or not, the Osmonds made their televised debut on the Andy Williams show singing a cleaned up version of this last one)

    The women in the alley just wait in line to sniff my good cocaine.
    (Version 3)

    Ah, for the good old days, when music was inoffensive.

    Dont you feel my leg
    cause if you feel my leg
    you'll want to feel my thigh
    and if you feel my thigh
    you'll want to feel up high.
    Dont you get me high
    and dont you give me rye
    cause if you give me rye
    then I'll believe your lies.
    If I believe your lies
    I'll let you feel up high.
    So, don't you get me high.

    (Don't Get Me High -Post 1918)

    Yes, there was a certain innocence to those old days.

  58. #58
    George L. Lorton
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    Jim didn't Johnny Cash also do Cocaine Blues, version 2? That sounds like a song of his.

  59. #59
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    He may have. That version has become the standard. Version #1 was the more common in it's day.

  60. #60
    George L. Lorton
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    Johnny's Cocaine Blues (Version 2) has a lot of cussing in it. He sung it at Fulsome(?) Prison in 1968.

  61. #61
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    Maria Muldaur sang a good version of "Don't You Feel My Leg" a couple of decades back. Rather underestimated woman.

  62. #62
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Don't you Feel My Leg? Never heard that one Monica. But if you say that Maria Muldaur is an underestimated woman that's good enough for me. Especially after the Million Miles fiasco? Duh? Where was my brain yesterday.

  63. #63
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    Well now, George. If you got to YouTube, you'll find quite a bit about Maria Muldaur from when she was young, to now - when she isn't. Not "Feel My Leg", though. Never mind. If it introduces you to her, it's worth it. Here's a link, and then explore further. Just look at how she was such a bluesy-girl and so innocent-looking (but not sounding), to what she is now - in full throttle of experience. I guess age happens to us all .... but I think she's celebrating every minute, with no regrets. I wish .. I wish ...

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=T6cPiXmn1o0
    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=0G_134pX4XA

  64. #64
    George L. Lorton
    Guest
    Thanks for the links, Monica. Maria Muldaur is the One hour Momma. I loved it. Speaking of Youtube did you see my link for the Ladies of ET, 'Flapper fun or Flappers-Roaring 20's'. Check out Jasons Charleston Class link as well it's few posts back, youtub fun. Both are in The Jazz Age A.R.L.T.B. topic.

  65. #65
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    I guess her death seeded an inspiration for Agatha Christie's short story: "The Affair At the Victory Ball".

    Martin Williams wrote: "The most well-known victim of drug abuse around this time was that of revue-star, party-girl and proto-flapper, Billie Carleton. It was of her that the 'Tatler' wrote:

    'She has cleverness, temperament and charm. Not enough of the first, and perhaps too much of the latter.'

    This verdict was proved tragically right. Carleton died of an over-dose of either cocaine or heroin (I don't recall which) after the Victory Ball, held at the Royal Albert Hall in London, on the night on 27th November, 1918. "

  66. #66
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    And also Noel Coward's 'The Vortex'.

 

 

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