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Ship Scrapping Issues

This discussion on "Ship Scrapping Issues" is in the Other Ships and Shipwrecks section; Since the disposal of old ships is becoming a matter of ever greater controversy, I ...

      
   
  1. #1
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    Ship Scrapping Issues

    Since the disposal of old ships is becoming a matter of ever greater controversy, I thought it might be a good idea to have a thread dedicated to discussing these issues, problems, and news.

    To kick it off there is this headline from the ContraCosta Times:
    Cleaning of vessels causes pollution, prompts review[indent]
    quote:

    The U.S. Maritime Administration announced late Friday that it will initiate "a complete and thorough review" of its ship-disposal program after California water regulators concluded that cleaning the hulls of obsolete vessels anchored in Suisun Bay causes pollution.

    New tests on two World War II relics found that scrubbing aged hulls of marine growth such as seaweed and barnacles causes copper, zinc, lead and other toxic metals to come off with the organic materials.

    There were 74 ships in the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet as of Feb. 1, most of them decommissioned cargo and Navy vessels awaiting disposal. The Coast Guard in June ordered any ship being taken to Texas for disposal to undergo hull cleaning to stop the spread of invasive marine species.

    At least four ships were cleaned at docks in Richmond and Alameda last year. The Times reported in September that federal documents showed that sheets of toxic metals came off the bottom of at least one ship and were left in water at the Port of Richmond, prompting a state investigation.
    For the rest of this story, go to http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/...l/16721550.htm

    Comment: be sure to check out some of the related stories. There are a lot of old ships at Suisan Bay and their material condition is not improving with each passing day.

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    This begs the question, will hauling them out to very deep water, say mid-Atlantic or Pacific, become the chosen method of disposal? Such places are hardly out of the food chain, but they offer some form of stasis. It would be interesting to see what the long term effects of accident incurred wrecks might be on the surrounding sea floor. Ships such as the "New Carissa" and the tankers which sank of the Spanish coast in deep waters might be places for extensive monitoring and recovery of organisms inhabiting the wreckage.

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    Richard

    Wouldn't the ships need to be "detoxified" before you sank them? I would think that you'd need to remove all toxic oils, fluids, asbestos etc before sinking them.

    Or better still, why not break them up where they lie, and then transport the scrap steel by cargo ship.

    You could always declare all of Suisun Bay a superfund site. That way you'd get Federal funding to do the scrapping.

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    I wonder how long a sunken vessel remains contaminated? What of the scores of WW2 wrecks in Truk Lagoon- are they still seeping oil and other waste material- or have they been naturally 'cleansed' after decades on the bottom?
    The fact the wrecks that were at ground zero for nuclear tests at the Bikini islands are now safe to dive upon suggests to me if they are no longer radioactive, then any ship sent to the bottom (except for oil tankers) should be more or less clean within a few decades..

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    Actually - No. The Bikini ships are diveable, but you are warned not to remain in the area beyond a suggested time limit. Neither are the WW2 ships "cleansed" after so many years. There has been quite a bit of money and research going into removing remaining fuel from bunkers and cargo areas before these ships finally collapse completely. I believe it was the tanker "Erika", which had the oil cargo removed as much as possible after she went under; no mean feat. It's enough of a concern that oil does seep back up to the surface from time to time. "Andrea Doria" is a liner in which baseball size globules are reported to gurgle upwards in front of divers. This stuff doesn't go away, and the toxic nature of it lasts for tens of thousands of years. I was aboard a NOAA ship in 1996, charting wreck locations off the Carolinas for just this reason.
    Serious business.

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    Regarding the WW2 wrecks in truk lagoon, and elsewhere- after all this time, could the munitions on board still be live? I was reading an old issue of National Geographic, and it had a few photos of divers exploring some WW2 wrecks- one diver posed near a pile of unexploded shells- Couldnt they go off at any moment?

    I wonder if the US Navy ever went down to these shallow depth WW2 wrecks and tried and detonate any explosives still on board, before any unwary civilain divers got blown to smithereens..

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    >>This begs the question, will hauling them out to very deep water, say mid-Atlantic or Pacific, become the chosen method of disposal?<<

    Given the expenses incurred in modern day demolition, this may well become the method of choice but this is far from a sure thing. Further, it may not even be that economical. Recall the Oriskany's saga which was nearly three years in the running. Not only did the ship have to be cleansed of all toxic materials, she also had to be stripped of anything a diver could get tangled up in.

    >>Such places are hardly out of the food chain, but they offer some form of stasis.<<

    Not entirely accurate I'm afraid. Quite a bit depends on the local conditions such as temperature, salinity, and what's living in the local ecology that might consider steel to be a hearty snack. That's why you have ships such as the Andrea Doria deteriorating at a prodigious rate while wrecks in somewhat warmer waters such as the Britannic are in surprisingly good condition, but then you have Titanic in very cold deep waters which isn't in such great shape.

    >>Regarding the WW2 wrecks in truk lagoon, and elsewhere- after all this time, could the munitions on board still be live?<<

    Damn right they're live, and that's one reason why diving on sunken warships is something one should be very cautious about. Anything that goes down in battle goes down with everything, including any unexpended ordnance.

    The Navy has never to my knowladge bothered to go down to any of it's wrecked ships to blow any of them up. Most are too deep, and even in shallow waters, there are just too many of them. All else aside, many of them are considered to be war graves so the operative understanding is "Look but don't touch!"

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    Some time was spent removing ammo from Truk ships, years ago, but believe it, every military ship sunk in combat is laden with live ammo. There have been several cases of "trophies" blowing up in a "collectors" hands. Then there was the fishing boat that brought up a "dead" torpedo in LI Sound. By the time the Navy could get in the area to retrieve it, all that was left of the fisherman was burned wood, floating on the surface. I believe this happened in the 70's.

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    Russia is making a little bit of progrsss in scrapping some of it's old subs. Unfortunately, the problems they face way outstrip their resources.

    See http://itar-tass.com/eng/level2.html...7321&PageNum=0

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    A follow up to the first post in this thread. From the Contra Costa Times:

    WWII vessels cleaned in Gulf[indent]
    quote:

    Two World War II ships from the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet are being cleaned in international waters in the Gulf of Mexico, where the environmental scrutiny that California regulators sought for them doesn't apply.

    One, the Jason, was cleaned Friday. Attempts were being made Monday to work on the other, the Queens Victory, said Rey Ramirez, harbormaster at the Port of Brownsville, Texas, where the ships are to be broken up.

    "It's being done 25 to 50 miles out (in) international waters," Ramirez said Monday.

    The Maritime Administration towed the ships from Suisun Bay in late December and early January as California clean water regulators were deciding whether to require permits for the work because of concerns about pollution.

    Cleaning in open waters "is the cheap and dirty way out," an environmentalist said.
    For the rest of the story, go to http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/...l/16792895.htm

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    And the game goes on. From The Contra Costa Times:

    Vessel disposal revisited[indent]
    quote:

    By Thomas Peele
    CONTRA COSTA TIMES
    The head of the U.S. Maritime Administration has promised an immediate overhaul of the agency's ship-disposal program to include environmental safeguards for the maintenance and dismantling of decaying vessels now stored in Suisun Bay and other fleets across the country.

    "We need to maintain vessels in a way that protects the environment. I have directed the staff to look at everything and develop a uniform system," the administrator, Sean Connaughton, said. "We have to make sure that ship recycling is done in a safe manner."

    No more ships will leave the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet and the administration's similar fleets in Virginia and Texas until such a system is in place, Connaughton said in an interview this week.

    "We need to take time to work these issues through," he said. "We have to address the risks."
    For the rest of the story, go to http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/...l/16808944.htm

    Translation: We got caught, so now we have to make things right!

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    From The Shipping Times:

    US Navy ship with Scottish connections sails off for ever[indent]
    quote:

    USS HUNLEY is departing from the James River Fleet today (in fact, as this is being written) on her last voyage. She will make her way to New Orleans and will be, in modern euphemistic terms, recycled. In other words, the old girl is off to get scrapped.
    For the rest of the story, go to http://www.shippingtimes.co.uk/item289_USS_HUNLEY.htm

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    From The Pilot OnLine:

    Federal ship-scrapping program is halted temporarily[indent]
    quote:

    The U.S. Maritime Administration has temporarily halted its ship-scrapping program, a move that could delay and complicate the removal of junk vessels in the James River Reserve Fleet, also known as the "g host f leet."

    No new disposal contracts will be awarded to salvage yards until a discrepancy over environmental laws governing ship recycling is resolved, said Sean T. Connaughton, the maritime administrator, in an interview this week.

    "We're kind of in a Catch-22 and need to work our way out of it," said Connaughton, adding that the legal tangle could take months to unravel.

    Also this week, Connaughton said he has ordered "a complete review" of a controversial 2003 contract that called for 13 ships from the James River to be dismantled in England.

    The $17.8 million contract caused a storm of protest and lawsuits from American and British environmentalists, who complained the United States should not be dumping toxic wastes from its obsolete ships on other nations.
    For the rest of this story, go to http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...1117&ran=58709

    Comment: Bureaucracy moves at two speeds: Dead slow, and slower then dead. In this case, the caution is not a bad idea given the toxic mess that a lot of these old ships are. I just hope the issues are resolved sooner rather then later since the condition of these ships isn't getting any better.

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    From CNews:

    Navy spends millions to sink ship[indent]
    quote:

    VICTORIA (CP) - The navy spent more than $4 million to get a retired destroyer "clean as a whistle" before it can be sunk in a West Coast naval exercise next month.

    Recent environmental regulations are making disposal of old ships an expensive project in ports across the country.

    But Lt.-Cmdr. Garry Hansen, the officer in charge of the 18-month cleanup of the 35-year-old destroyer HMCS Huron, said it's money well spent.

    The Huron will be sunk next month.

    Behind the decision to scour the vessel of potentially hazardous materials was a change in the way the international community regards hazardous waste disposal and the sale and treatment of retired military equipment. Old navy ships fall into both categories.
    Story at http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2...014064-cp.html

    Comment: This article offers a snapshot of just what it takes to legally dispose of a ship, even as a target.

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    From The Shipping Times:

    Ships that have crossed the bar...[indent]
    quote:

    Five ships to report that have recently been sold to the breakers.

    First off is the 1979-built bulk carrier HISTRIA SUN. She was constructed by Santierul Naval Constanta S.A, Romania and was operated by Histria Shipmanagement. Reportedly sold to Bangladesh breakers. Prior to her last name she was called BREAZA
    Story at http://www.shippingtimes.co.uk/item501_SCRAP.htm

    Comment: Pakistan and India are getting quite a bit of this work.

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    From The Pilot OnLine:

    Ruling clears way for removing James River 'ghost fleet'[indent]
    quote:

    The U.S. Maritime Administration has lifted its ban on ship-scrapping in Virginia waters, clearing the way for renewed dismantling of old rusting vessels in the James River Reserve Fleet, nicknamed the "ghost fleet."

    The decision, announced in a letter Thursday to U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Davis, a Newport News Republican, ends six weeks of negotiation and angst about the future of the federal government's ship-disposal program.

    It also is good news to salvage yards, including Bay Bridge Enterprises, a Chesapeake facility that has won multiple government contracts in recent years to recycle ghost ships.
    Story at http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...3698&ran=46434

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    From News From Bangladesh Readers Opinion section:

    From "Ship Breaking" to "Ship Building" - what a transformation![indent]
    quote:

    Monday April 30 2007 19:31:43 PM BDT


    A.H. Jaffor Ullah,USA


    Bangladesh is a country of rivers and estuaries. Therefore, boat building in this reverine nation has long been a cottage industry. Bangladesh also had earned the dubious reputation of the most intense "Ship Breaking" nation in the world; the most activities confined to Chittagong district. But what is a best kept secret finally came out in the western press today. AFP reported that Bangladesh's reputation as a small ship building nation is spreading fast. Thus, other nations are placing order to companies in Bangladesh to build smaller ocean worthy vessels.
    For the rest of the letter and the article it's commenting on, go to http://www.bangladesh-web.com/view.p...00000000158695

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    From The Shipping Times:

    Elderly gas carrier off to the scrapyard[indent]
    quote:

    Norwegian energy transportation company, BW Gas, announced today that they have sold the elderly VLGC carrier BERGE ARROW for scrap. The vessel was delivered to the buyers 4 May 2007.
    Story at http://www.shippingtimes.co.uk/item566_bergearrow.htm

    Comment: Did anyone notice that they didn't mention who the buyers were? I wonder why?

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    From Motor Boats Monthly:

    Container Ship May Be Scuttled[indent]
    quote:

    Salvage experts trying to decide what to do with the beached container ship MSC Napoli say that one option under consideration is to tow the vessel to deep water and sink her
    Story at http://www.ybw.com/auto/newsdesk/200...35mbmnews.html

    Comment: There would still be the issue of cleaning her up to remove toxic materials to deal with, but this strikes me as being a very practical solution to a ship that's obviously a constructive total loss. Considering that this whole affair began with cracks appearing in the hull, I think it's a given that the Napoli wouldn't survive a tow to the shipbreakers.

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    From allAfrica.com:

    Kenya: IMO Talks to Provide the Legal Basis for Shipwreck[indent]
    quote:

    Transport across Lake Victoria, the Indian Ocean and other marine waters is set to receive a boost as the international maritime organisation (IMO) conference gets underway in Nairobi this week.

    If the conference adopts a legal draft on shipwreck removal, the threat of shipwrecks to navigation will no longer be a ship captain's nightmare.


    The draft - "Shipwreck Removal Convention" - will provide the legal basis for IMO member countries to remove wrecks from their Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs).
    Story at http://allafrica.com/stories/200705170021.html

    Comment: Couldn't think of a better place to put this. Since shipwreck removal is scrapping almost by default, this thread was as good as any. It's also a nice article on an issue that's been a problem for safe navigation for centuries.

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    From Reuters:

    EU to lay out ship dismantling proposals[indent]
    quote:

    BRUSSELS, May 18 (Reuters) - The European Commission will lay out a set of proposals next week to tighten rules on ship dismantling in an effort to make the practice less dangerous and more environmentally sound.

    The European Union executive says 200 to 600 large ships are taken apart every year worldwide, with at least two thirds of them dismantled in the Indian sub-continent under dangerous environmental and safety conditions.
    Story at http://today.reuters.com/News/Crises...ryId=L18187489

    Comment: I know, I know, talk is cheap, but at least they are seriously talking about it and that's a start. The problem of disposing of worn out overaged ships isn't about to go away, and stands to become a good deal worse as overaged and obsolete tonnage needs to be replaced.

  22. #22
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    From Business Insurance:

    E.C. moves to make ship dismantling safer[indent]
    quote:

    BRUSSELS, Belgium—The European Commission is taking steps to make the dismantling of ships safer and less damaging to the environment.

    In a consultation paper published May 22, the commission does not present a completed plan but suggests actions to be taken in the European Union until the process now underway to develop an international convention on safe ship recycling is completed.
    Story at http://www.businessinsurance.com/cgi...l?newsId=10261

    Comment: A follow on story really, but at least these people are actually starting to offer up some constructive ideas. Now if only they can put some meat on the bones.

  23. #23
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    From MSNBCTravel:

    Sinking ships will boost tourism, group says[indent]
    quote:

    MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. - The so-called "Graveyard of the Atlantic" can expect a few more guests. But unlike the ships and vessels that sank off North Carolina's coast because of storms and war, an effort is under way to promote tourism by purposely sinking ships so they'll become artificial reefs.

    Such reefs would attract divers, sport fishing enthusiasts, and researchers who can examine "underwater universities," supporters said.

    The Eastern Carolina Artificial Reef Association has already received a donated barge and a sailboat for that purpose. Now, the group and its supporters want to sink a large decommissioned destroyer, cruiser, or other military ship on the ocean floor.
    Story at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18853363/

  24. #24
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    From The Gaurdian Unlimited:

    British firm loses contract to dismantle nine US 'ghost ships'[indent]
    quote:

    A contract to tow nine dilapidated US navy reserve ships 3,500 miles across the Atlantic to be broken up on the river Tees in Hartlepool has been cancelled, to the dismay of the company that won the contract but the delight of many people in the town.
    Able UK won the £11m contract to dismantle 13 "ghost ships" in 2003 and the first four were delivered by Dutch tug to the Graythorp yard in Hartlepool in November that year. However, they have been laid up following protracted legal and environmental negotiations about how they would be dismantled and the potential damage that could be caused.
    Story at 2091840%2C00.html,http://environment.guardian.co.uk/waste/story/0,,2091840,00.html

    Comment: Some would consider this a good thing.

    Is it?

    If this firm had a plan, then it seems kind of silly to turn away work which would bring gainful employment to the locals. Also a bit hypocritical in light of all the hate and discontent about sending all these old worn out ships to Alang.

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    From Aftenposten.no:

    Kola "a nuclear bomb"[indent]
    quote:

    The vast amount of radioactive waste that is the legacy of Russia's nuclear-powered submarines has been known to be a looming environmental disaster - now it can be far worse.

    Research now indicates that the enormous tanks holding discarded submarine fuel rods in the Andreeva Bay may explode at any time, creating a nuclear nightmare for Northern Europe.

    Norway and other Western authorities have argued for years that the stockpile of highly radioactive nuclear waste on the Kola peninsula poses an environmental hazard to the local population and for Norway.
    Story at http://www.aftenposten.no/english/lo...cle1814646.ece

    Comment: While quite sensationalist, the problem they're going on about is not non-existant.

  26. #26
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    From The Pilot OnLine:

    Two more rusted vessels are slated to be scrapped[indent]
    quote:

    Two more environmentally risky ships in the James River Reserve Fleet will be scrapped, including one at a salvage yard in Chesapeake, under contracts announced Wednesday by the U.S. Maritime Administration.

    Bay Bridge Enterprises, the local yard, will receive $851,194 to dispose of the Empire State, a former passenger ship renamed the Barrett that ferried troops during the Korean and Vietnam wars.

    The other ship slated to leave the "Ghost Fleet" is the Cape Clear, a freighter, built in 1963. It will be towed to Texas and scrapped at the ESCO Marine yard in Brownsville, which was awarded $537,726 for the job.
    For the rest of the story, go to http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...621&ran=164506

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    From The BBC:

    Company wins 'ghost ship' battle[indent]
    quote:

    The scrapping of so-called "ghost ships" on Teesside looks likely to go ahead, after a u-turn by council bosses.
    Able UK won a controversial contract with the US government to dismantle up to 13 vessels at its Hartlepool yard, and four ships arrived in late 2003.

    But delays caused by environmental and planning concerns prevented any work.

    Hartlepool Council has now removed the final hurdle, by admitting it can no longer block planning permission.
    For the rest of the story, go to http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...es/6762979.stm

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    From The Navy Times:

    ‘A floating junkyard’[indent]
    quote:

    BENICIA, Calif. — From afar, the ghostly warships recall a fierce phalanx ready for battle. A closer look, though, shows the rust and rot of ships unfit for duty or even dismantling, a quandary that is costing U.S. taxpayers millions of dollars and could cause environmental misery that will cost millions more.

    This is the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, a collection of once-valiant troop transports, tankers and other vessels dating back to World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

    Before they can be scrapped and sold, Coast Guard regulations require the removal of the barnacles and other sea creatures clinging to their hulls. That process causes toxic paint to flake off into the water, and fear of contamination has brought ship disposal to a halt in California, and delayed it in the U.S.’s other “mothball fleets” in Texas and Virginia.
    For the rest of the story, go to http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/0...fleets_070706/

  29. #29
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    From The Gaurdian:

    Concerns Raised Over Breaking Up Ships[indent]
    quote:

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Water-quality officials and environmentalists raised concerns Friday over the Bush administration's abrupt decision to move full-steam ahead with breaking up old warships rotting in California's ``mothball fleet.''

    The federal Maritime Administration announced Thursday that it would next month lift its moratorium on disposing of the ships. A collection of more than 50 troop transports, tankers and other vessels are rusting in limbo northeast of San Francisco.

    Such a step would set in motion the towing of some vessels from Suisun Bay, a shallow estuary, to the former Naval Air Station Alameda, where the warships would be scrubbed of sea life before being hauled to a ship-breaking facility in Texas.
    Go to http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/s...762833,00.html

    Comment: Concerns are well and good and the environmentalists are not without jutification here. What's irritating here is that these people are loud in identifying the problem, and almost dead silent when it comes to offering a viable solution.

    C'mon guys, where's the beef?

  30. #30
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    From The Pilot OnLine.com:

    As ghost ships dry up, scrap biz looks to Texas[indent]
    quote:

    A Chesapeake ship-breaking yard, which has made a name for itself by scrapping junk vessels from the James River Reserve Fleet, or "ghost fleet," wants to expand into Texas.

    Bay Bridge Enterprises hopes to develop a $4 million facility in Brownsville, near the Mexican border, in the hope of winning federal contracts to scrap more unwanted hulks anchored in Texas and California.

    With the ghost fleet cut in half in recent years, from about 100 ships to 45 today, the U.S. Maritime Administration is expected to turn its attention - and money - to ridding obsolete vessels at its two other reserve fleets: near Beaumont, Texas, and in Suisan Bay, in northern California.
    Story at http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...136&ran=167168

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    From RIA Novosti:

    &#92;b[Japan to finance dismantling of three Russian nuclear submarines}[indent]
    quote:

    VLADIVOSTOK, August 3 (RIA Novosti) - Japan will finance the scrapping of three Russian nuclear submarines decommissioned from the Pacific Fleet under a joint project with Russia, a senior Japanese diplomat said Friday.

    The three Victor class vessels will be dismantled under the Star of Hope program for the dismantlement of decommissioned nuclear submarines in Russia's Far East, which was adopted in 2003 during a visit by former Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to Russia.
    Story at http://en.rian.ru/world/20070803/70279485.html

    Comment: As many overage submarines as the Russians have, this is good news. While some are technically in commission, they haven't gone to sea in a very long time and are not that far away from sinking where they're moored. Of course, the question this raises is if the Russians can't afford to scrap these boats on their own dime, one has to wonder where they're getting the money to finance their proposed naval buildup.

  32. #32
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    From The Tri-Valley Herald:

    Ship scrapping could bring wave of rebirth to docks[indent]
    quote:

    RICHMOND — Down concrete staircases crumbling with age, past rusted pipes and piles of trash, executives of two ship companies poked around the citys long-abandoned dry docks Monday.
    To the idea that a ship scrapping operation could bring the rebirth of the waterfront here, they offered a tentative one word answer: maybe.

    We are at the very beginning of whats possible here, said Frank Foti, chief executive of Vigor Industrial, a marine company based in Portland, Ore. Were looking. Its too early to know anything. I am not going to talk about specifics.

    Foti and others toured the World War II-era waterfront at the invitation of Councilman Tom Butt, who wants the city to lease the area to companies that could scrap U.S. Maritime Administration ships from the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet there.
    Full story at http://www.insidebayarea.com/trivall...ews/ci_6571461

  33. #33
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    From The Virginia Pilot OnLine:

    Five more ships to leave the James River Reserve Fleet[indent]
    quote:

    Five unwanted hulks, including a World War II relic, will soon leave the James River Reserve Fleet - known locally as the " ghost fleet" - under a $2.1 million disposal contract with a Maryland scrap yard.

    All five vessels - the Cape Charles, the Pride, the Scan, the Southern Cross and the Sphinx - will be towed up the Chesapeake Bay within 30 days to North American Ship Recycling, located in Sparrow s Point near Baltimore.

    There, the retired behemoths are slated to be drained of their waste oils and fuels, their lead paint scraped away, their toxic-tainted wiring and gauges yanked out, and their steel flanks cut up and sold to the highest bidder.
    For the rest, go to http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...1309&ran=99318

    Comment: For the record, the former USS Sphinx is not a cable ship but a former light repair ship converted out of the hull of a Tank Landing Ship. See http://www.navsource.org/archives/10/19/1924.htm

    The website of the group that tried to save her is at http://www.usssphinxarl24memorial.com/index.html

  34. #34
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    From Chennai Online:

    SC's directions on ship dismantling[indent]
    quote:

    New Delhi, Sept 6: The Supreme Court today directed that the recommendations made by Technical Experts Committee (TEC) on hazardous waste ship shall continue to be in force until the Union Government formulates a suitable code for dismantling of contaminated ships.


    A Bench of Justices Arijit Pasayat and S H Kapadia said that until the code was formulated, the officials of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board and other statutory agencies should verify the documents before granting permission for ship-breaking contractors.
    For the rest, go HERE

  35. #35
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    From The Times of India:

    SC empowers govt to send back contaminated ships[indent]
    quote:

    NEW DELHI: In an order that is already taking on political hues, the SC has empowered the government to send back any contaminated ship that comes to India for breaking at Alang or any other ship-breaking yard in the country.

    The Indian ship-breaking industry has an annual turnover of more than Rs 2,000 crore. Reacting sharply to the order, the ship-breaking association in Gujarat has reportedly threatened to approach the BJP state government against the order which the UPA had pursued in Delhi.
    For the rest, go to http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/I...ow/2348939.cms

  36. #36
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    From the BBC:

    Inquiry set for ghost ships plans[indent]
    quote:

    The scrapping of so-called "ghost ships" on Teesside is likely to move a step closer when a public inquiry is held into the controversial plans.
    Able UK won a contract to dismantle former US naval vessels at its facility in Graythorp, Hartlepool.

    Last year the town's council threw out plans to develop the dock into a recycling facility, but new government policies undermined the decision.
    For the rest, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...es/6994992.stm

  37. #37
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    From SignOnSanDiego.com:

    Fines threatened over ghost fleet in Suisun Bay[indent]
    quote:

    WALNUT CREEK – The U.S. Maritime Administration may be fined if fails to come up with a plan to stop toxic paint from falling into Suisun Bay from obsolete ships, state water regulators said,
    A violation notice the Bay Area Water Quality Control Board sent to the federal agency Tuesday warned that penalties could reach $25,000 per day.
    Story at http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/s...hostfleet.html

  38. #38
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    From The BBC:

    Second bid for 'ghost ships' firm[indent]
    quote:

    Revised plans to scrap so-called US "ghost ships" on Teesside are being considered on Friday.
    Hartlepool-based Able UK wants to dismantle the former naval vessels at a facility in nearby Graythorp.

    Last year the town council rejected plans for recycling facilities at the dock, but the firm will appeal against that decision at a public inquiry.
    For the rest, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...es/7029291.stm

  39. #39
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    From The Pilot OnLine:

    Ship from ghost fleet headed to Florida Keys as reef[indent]
    quote:

    The last time Sam Hall saw the big warship was 62 years ago in New York Harbor, at the end of World War II.

    Back then, Hall was a young soldier returning from the Pacific. When he walked off the former Gen. Harry S. Taylor to cheering throngs that day, he never looked back.

    But on Monday, he was in Norfolk to see his old ship again, and to learn how the former Taylor - later renamed the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, now a 524-foot behemoth of rusting steel, peeling paint and odd Hollywood fame - will become the next big thing for divers and scientists off the Florida Keys.

    When workers at Colonna's Shipyard in Norfolk finish scrubbing the Vandenberg clean of asbestos, petroleum and toxic PCBs, the ship will be towed down the Atlantic coast and sunk about six miles southeast of Key West - the largest artificial reef in Florida.
    For the rest, go to http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...225&ran=152810

    Photo page on the Vandenburg at http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/22/22145.htm

  40. #40
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Scrap prices for ships seen falling[indent]
    quote:

    Scrap prices for ships may fall after India tightened environmental laws and Bangladeshi breakers' yards agreed to a temporary halt of purchases, Global Marketing Systems Inc, the world's biggest trader of the vessels, said.
    For the rest, go to http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...l&article=3289

  41. #41
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    From The New Zealand Morning Herald:

    Weather scuppers ship's dive to seabed[indent]
    quote:

    Sinking of the former Navy frigate HMNZS Canterbury as a dive attraction in the Bay of Islands on Saturday has been postponed because of forecast poor weather and sea conditions.

    "We really had no option," Bay of Islands Canterbury Charitable Trust spokesman Richard Witehira said after a trust meeting yesterday.

    The vessel was to have been towed from its berth at Opua wharf this morning to its scuttling location at Deep Water Cove just inside Cape Brett at the southern entrance to the Bay of Islands. Final preparations were then to have been made for its sinking by explosive charges on Saturday afternoon.

    The 3000-tonne ship will now be scuttled on either October 26 or the following Saturday, November 3, weather conditions permitting.
    The two page story begins at http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/1/...ectid=10469112

    Comment: Better safe then sorry.

  42. #42
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    Peter Knego has a blog dealing with the scrapping of the Anastasis (The former Victoria) on the Maritime Matters website which starts at http://maritimematters.blogspot.com/...-at-alang.html

    Some nice photos here, including a recent shot taken of the Norway.

  43. #43
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    Part Two of Peter Knego's blog on the scrapping of the Anastasis appears at http://maritimematters.blogspot.com/...-part-two.html

  44. #44
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    From The Hellenic Shipping Times:

    Scrap steel spot prices are rising 35% this year as supply has tightened[indent]
    quote:

    Domestic steel scrap prices are on pace to increase by 35% this year because of solid domestic demand combined with explosive global demand that has tightened supply. Supply is tight even as domestic demand has dropped 5% because exports have been surging 24%. Looking ahead, steel scrap supply will be even tighter and prices will go even higher in 2008, says Mike Locker of steel analyst Locker Associates in New York. "Scrap demand will continue to grow in the future," according to Locker, "and that will make life difficult for the scrap buyers at the mills." Global steel production tracked by the International Iron and Steel Institute already is headed for 1.3 billion metric tons in 2007, an increase of 6.5% over the 1.22 million metric tons in 2006. And the Bureau of International Recycling sees another 6% rate of growth in 2008.
    Full story at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...s&article=3655

    Comment: The people at Alang are going to love this.

  45. #45
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    Michael

    I agree. I think Alang's slow period is coming to an end. With all single hull tankers to be retired by 2010, (another by product of SOLAS I think), as well as a lot of the older passenger ships, and more and more old Soviet era ships being scrapped, I think for the next few years, Alang and Bangladesh will be busier than ever.

  46. #46
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    I'm inclined to agree, though I'm sure that the new environmental regulations coming into force are going to have an effect. Even if India doesn't do anything, it's going to be getting tougher to dump a really toxic old scow any old place and get away with it. The shipping companies are, more and more, under a microscope and they know it.

  47. #47
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    From The San Francisco Chronicle:

    Maritime Administration sued over rusting mothball fleet in Suisun Bay[indent]
    quote:

    (10-29) 14:38 PDT SUISUN BAY - -- Three San Francisco-based environmental organizations filed suit in federal court today to force the U.S. Maritime Administration to dispose of most of the ships in the Suisun Bay reserve fleet.

    The suit claims the ships of the so-called "mothball fleet" have "ceased being useful for transportation and are now just floating junkyards" full of toxic materials, polluting San Francisco Bay and its tributaries.
    For the rest, go to http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl.../BAL9T2RMO.DTL

    Comment: These people want a fast solution to a vexing problem but guess who's first on the picket lines when the government actually tries to scrap one of these old overaged ships! Ya gotta love it!

  48. #48
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    From the BBC:

    Council faces 'ghost ships' bill[indent]
    quote:

    Hartlepool Council faces legal bills of up to £1m following the row over the scrapping of so-called "ghost ships".
    Able UK says it will be seeking costs incurred during a planning inquiry.
    For the rest, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...es/7072590.stm

  49. #49
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    From OneNews:

    Old navy lady scuttled[indent]
    quote:

    The frigate Canterbury, once the pride of the navy, has ended its days in a watery grave at the bottom of the ocean in Northland's Deep Water Cove.
    Brief story and link to vidio at http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/411749/1427802

  50. #50
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    From OneNews:

    Ship of shame scuttled in the Pacific[indent]
    quote:

    Residents of the Cook Islands are outraged after a ship and its deadly load of 500 tonnes of asbestos was scuttled in the middle of a whale sanctuary.

    Locals say the toxic material was dumped just off the coast of Rarotonga after New Zealand refused to help get rid of it. But our government says it was not involved in the decision.

    Concern for the Pacific centres around whether the scuttling of the Miss Mataroa could open the flood gates as a cheap option to get rid of unwanted waste.
    Story at http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/1318360/1430731

  51. #51
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    From The Virginian Pilot OnLine:

    Shipyard closure sinks plan for 6 'ghost fleet' ships[indent]
    quote:

    The fates of six ships from the James River Reserve Fleet are in limbo after a Maryland salvage yard that was supposed to scrap the vessels abruptly closed and its owners disappeared.

    North American Ship Recycling Inc., near Baltimore, won federal contracts in August worth $2.1 million to dispose of the government-owned dinosaurs.

    But the yard, which opened in 2004 amid much fanfare, including a celebratory speech from then-U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta, shut down without notice sometime last month, leaving behind two of the Virginia "ghost fleet" ships and plenty of questions.

    To protect against a fuel spill, government-hired crews have since installed rubber booms around the two abandoned ships, the Sphinx and the Hoist, and will monitor them daily until the matter is resolved, officials said.
    For the full story, see http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...6585&ran=62912

    Comment: Anyone care to take any bets on how long it takes for the indictments and arrest warrants to be handed down? When owners just "disappear" it's not because the concern was doing well, and if it was, you have to wonder which numbered account in the Cayman Islands the money ended up in.

  52. #52
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Alang: a toxic ''hot-spot'' for irresponsible shipowners[indent]
    quote:

    Located 288km northwest of glitzy Mumbai, Alang is a toxic hot spot that continues to attract irresponsible ship owners who run aground their endof-life vessels. The biggest ''graveyard'' for decommissioned ships, it caught global attention in the late 1990s when Greenpeace International highlighted appalling working conditions and widespread pollution of the once pristine beach.
    Full story at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...l&article=4754

    Comment: What? Alang toxic? Just because of a few [s]thousand[/s] tons of murcury, dioxins, PBC's, organotin compounds, asbestos, and heavy fuel oil getting into everything including the sand that workers walk barefoot in? Say it ain't so!

  53. #53
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    From The Statesman.com:

    Former Navy troop transport served in battle of Iwo Jima[indent]
    quote:

    SOUTH PADRE ISLAND — A 473-foot ship that served as a World War II troop carrier, a cargo and passenger liner and a training vessel for generations of Texas A&M University Sea Cadets is about to have a new life as an underwater habitat and diving destination in the Gulf of Mexico.

    The 7,000 ton Texas Clipper was scheduled to be sunk today in 134 feet of water about 17 miles off South Padre Island to become the state Parks and Wildlife Department's newest artificial reef.

    The sinking will come after almost 10 years of planning and $4 million in preparations.

    "This is the largest thing we've had to do and certainly the most time consuming," said Dale Shively, the department's artificial reef coordinator.
    For the rest, click on http://www.statesman.com/news/conten...17sinking.html

  54. #54
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    From Dawn:

    Ship-breaking industry on verge of collapse[indent]
    quote:

    KARACHI, Nov 17: Ship-breaking industry is on the verge of total collapse owing to large-scale import of re-rollable material under the garb of ferrous (re-meltable) scrap which does not have duty and sales tax at import stage.

    The Pakistan Ship-Breakers’ Association (PSBA) has taken up the issue with the chairman, Federal Board of Revenue (FBR), Abdullah Yusuf, and pointed out that it was not only causing huge revenue loss, but also damaging the ship-breaking industry.
    More at http://www.dawn.com/2007/11/18/ebr1.htm

  55. #55
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    From The Miami Herald:

    Retired Air Force ship being prepared for reef duty in the Keys[indent]
    quote:

    NORFOLK, Va. -- A decommissioned Air Force ship is being prepared at a Virginia shipyard to become a new habitat for marine life and an attraction for recreational divers in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

    A $6 million project to turn the 524-foot-long General Hoyt S. Vandenberg into a reef is scheduled to culminate in the spring of 2008, with the vessel's sinking in 140 feet of water about six miles south of Key West.
    Story at http://www.miamiherald.com/986/story/310261.html

    Comment: Just goes to show that if you can't cut 'em up, there are alternatives!

  56. #56
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    From myTELUS:

    Second World War ship sunk off Texas for diving[indent]
    quote:

    SOUTH PADRE ISLAND, Texas - A Second World War ship that served for decades as a training vessel for Texas A&M University sea cadets has been sunk in the Gulf of Mexico in order to become an underwater habitat and diving destination.

    The biggest challenge in repurposing the 144-metre, 7,000-tonne Texas Clipper was dealing with polychlorinated biphenyls, manmade chemicals in such things as hydraulic fluids, plastics and adhesives that have been found to be hazardous to health. To comply with federal rules governing artificial reefs, more than 100,000 kilograms of PCBs were removed from the ship before it went down.
    For the rest, see http://www.mytelus.com/travel/articl...icleID=2827065

  57. #57
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    From The Shipping Times:

    New ship recycling venture at Harland & Wolff[indent]
    quote:

    Diversification continues in wake of MSC NAPOLI scrapping contract...



    Harland and Wolff Heavy Industries and environmental management consultancy Golder Associates have joined forces with V.Navy, part of the world’s biggest marine, energy and financial services outsourcing firm V.Group to provide unique full-service, environmentally sound and socially responsible ship recovery and recycling.
    For the rest, go to http://www.shippingtimes.co.uk/item9...LAND-WOLFF.htm

  58. #58
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    From The Statesman.com:

    The ship that couldn't sink straight[indent]
    quote:

    SOUTH PADRE ISLAND — A World War II ship purposely sunk in the Gulf of Mexico to create an artificial reef settled on a side that had been cut open for divers.

    The unexpected landing, blocking holes cut into the superstructure and the hull of the Texas Clipper, is the latest mishap for the ship. Other problems included an unplanned sinking near Beaumont and a $600,000 cleanup of hazardous chemicals.
    For more, go to http://www.statesman.com/news/conten...unkenship.html

    Comment: Just goes to show that sinking a ship isn't the problem. Doing in in a controlled manner so that the hulk comes to rest in the way it's needed to, that's the problem!

  59. #59
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    From The Virginia Pilot On-Line:

    2 ships from Ghost Fleet return for last time after initial deal sinks[indent]
    quote:

    Two military ships abandoned at a salvage yard near Baltimore will be returning to Virginia for disposal, the government announced Wednesday.

    The Sphinx and the Hoist, former Navy vessels built during World War II, will be dismantled at Bay Bridge Enterprises in Chesapeake under contracts worth nearly $800,000, according to the U.S. Maritime Administration.

    The ships could arrive in Chesapeake as early as Friday, said Rebecca Robinson, vice president and project manager for Bay Bridge Enterprises.
    For the rest, go to http://content.hamptonroads.com/stor...7827&ran=62310

  60. #60
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Japan's Scrap Steel Price Rises for First Time in 11 Weeks[indent]
    quote:

    Japan's scrap iron and steel prices rose for the first time in 11 weeks, as Chinese steelmakers increased purchases after prices fell from a record. The average cost of so-called H2 grade ferrous scrap rose 0.1 percent to 34,963 yen ($315) a ton this week, from the previous period, according to the Japan Ferrous Raw Materials Association.
    Story at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...s&article=5716

    Comment: I don't think the people at Alang will be frowning over this!

  61. #61
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    I'm left to wonder of there are similar scrapping issues with grounded fleets of airplanes- Does the US Airforce and Navy scrap their old planes, or are there 'airplane mothballs' for the 'ships of the sky'? How about the fleets of old commercial jet liners?
    I once saw a picture from the old USSR of acres filled with obsolete and run down jet fighters..

  62. #62
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    There are aircraft boneyards in the United States where "mothballing" as well as reclaimation, recovery and scrapping is done. The most famous is the AMARC facility at Davis-Monathan Air Force Base.

  63. #63
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    Michael, any guesses as to how many planes are at that facility? How old are they? Any date back to WW2, or would the oldest be jet fighters from the late 50s?

  64. #64
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    A few weeks ago, I was looking at a Lockheed Super Constellation, restored to first class condition by an Australian team.

    She was saved from a plane graveyard near Tucson by a remarkable chance. Some years ago, somebody inspected her and failed to close a door when leaving. She was colonised by birds and when scrap buyers looked at her years later she was such a mess that they wouldn't buy her. Some Aussies got hold of her and now she's flying again and looking great.
    Dave Gittins
    Titanic: Monument and Warning.
    http://titanicebook.com/Book.html

  65. #65
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    >>Michael, any guesses as to how many planes are at that facility?<<

    Not a clue. Thousands to be sure and whatever gof you believe in only knows what's stashed in some remote corner that nobody looks at any more.

  66. #66
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    From The Navy Times:

    WWII minesweeper sunk in Atlantic for reef[indent]
    quote:

    INDIAN RIVER INLET, Del. — A 175-foot World War II-era Navy ship has been sent to the bottom of the Atlantic as part of an ongoing effort to attract marine life.
    Story at http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/1...weeper_071211/

    Naval Vessels Register entry at http://www.nvr.navy.mil/nvrships/details/MSF215.htm

    Navsource entry at http://www.navsource.org/archives/11/02215.htm (No photo although the lead ship can be viewed at http://www.navsource.org/archives/11/02136.htm )

  67. #67
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    From The American Shipper:

    MarAd scrapping five more in ghost fleet[indent]
    quote:

    The U.S. Maritime Administration said it has awarded contracts to send five ships to the breakers: four from the James River Reserve Fleet in Newport News, Va., and one from the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Texas.
    The four from the James River Reserve Fleet had all been under a contract with North American Ship Recycling of Sparrows Point, Md., which ceased operations before it could take possession of the ships.
    For the rest, go to http://www.americanshipper.com/SNW_story.asp?news=79843

  68. #68
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    From The BBC:

    June scrap date for 'ghost ships'[indent]
    quote:

    The company behind plans to scrap former US warships on Teesside has given a date for work to start after years of wrangling.
    Able UK hopes to have all the required licences in place over the next few weeks allowing work to start in June.
    For more, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...es/7172421.stm

    Comment: If your information is a bit rusty on this, be sure to check out the earlier related stories linked to on the right side of this article.

  69. #69
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    From Hoovers:

    Work could begin on 'ghost ships' in spring[indent]
    quote:

    ABLE UK could start work on scrapping rusting "ghost ships" as soon as the spring - and with it create hundreds of jobs.

    The Hartlepool firm finally secured planning permission in October for a dry dock and new quays at its Teesside Environmental Reclamation and Recycling Centre at Graythorp.

    Construction work required to prepare for dismantling is expected to begin early next month and will take three months, but the firm still needs a waste management licence from the Environment Agency to scrap the ships.
    For the rest, see This Hotlink

  70. #70
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Recycle your ship[indent]
    quote:

    The International Standards Association (ISO) has launched the first document of a new series of management system standards for the recycling of ships. The new series, ISO 30000, Ship recycling management systems, will support environmental protection and increase the safety of workers. Ship recycling contributes to the global conservation of energy and resources. However, the presence of asbestos, hydrocarbons and other environmentally hazardous substances in ships can, if the scrapping process is not carefully controlled, have negative repercussions for the environment and human health.
    For the rest, go to http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...l&article=7832

  71. #71
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    From Dawn:

    Ship with toxic waste being purchased[indent]
    quote:

    KARACHI, Jan 22: An oil tanker loaded with toxic chemicals is being purchased by a Pakistani ship-breaker, sources said on Tuesday.

    The tanker ‘Atlantida’, at present anchored at the Singapore Port, was purchased by a Bangladesh ship-breaker, but the deal was cancelled.

    Now its owners M/s Tsakos Shipping & Trading in Greece and Mandassia Marine in Cyprus were negotiating with the Pakistani ship-breaker, the sources said.
    Full story at http://www.dawn.com/2008/01/23/ebr8.htm

  72. #72
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    From The Times of India:

    53 ships docked without safety norms, SC told[indent]
    quote:

    NEW DELHI: The 'Blue Lady' case, it seems, was a mere tip of the iceberg. The Ship Recycling Industries Association has admitted in the Supreme Court that 53 ships have been beached at the Alang ship-breaking yard without the requisite safety certificates as mandated by the apex court in its last order, handing another fait accompli to the courts and the government.
    Full story at This Hotlink.

  73. #73
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    From The Herald-Tribune:

    Officials set May sink date for ship planned as artificial reef[indent]
    quote:

    KEY WEST, Fla. -- Officials overseeing the transformation of a retired U.S. Air Force missile tracking ship into an artificial reef off Key West said Saturday they are planning to sink the ship May 15.

    The General Hoyt S. Vandenberg is currently at a Norfolk, Va., shipyard ...
    For the rest, go to http://www.heraldtribune.com/article.../APN/801260646

  74. #74
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    From The Economic Times:

    India ahead of IMO on ship recycling norms[indent]
    quote:

    International Maritime Organisation (IMO) appears to be following the Indian course in fixing norms for the regulation of the ship recycling industry. Dr Nikos Mikelis, secretary of IMO, made this observation while addressing a large gathering of personages from various countries who were participating in a national workshop held recently.

    The IMO-sponsored workshop on ‘Development of the International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships’ was held at Maritime Training Institure, Mumbai, on January 8, 2008.
    For the rest of the story, go HERE

  75. #75
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    From InRich.com:

    'Ghost Fleet' ship, Bayamon, sold for scrap[indent]
    quote:

    NEWPORT NEWS -- The U.S. Maritime Administration says another ship from the James River Reserve Fleet is being sold for scrap.

    The Bayamon, a vehicle carrier built in 1970, was sold to All Star Metals of Brownsville, Texas, for $12,221.
    Brief story at http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.a...1-29-0226.html

    Comment: 67 down, less then 40 to go.

  76. #76
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Global new ship recycling regulations by next year - IMO secretary general[indent]
    quote:

    The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) said it expects to adopt new globally applicable ship recycling regulations for international shipping and recycling facilities by next year. Speaking at 'The India Maritime Summit 2008' here, IMO Secretary General Efthimios Mitropoulos said the new law, 'The International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships' will include regulations for the design, construction, operation and preparation of ships to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising safety or operational efficiency.
    Full story at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...l&article=8648

  77. #77
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    From The Times of India:

    'Dead ships' a security threat too?[indent]
    quote:

    NEW DELHI: The 'dead ships' coming to India under flags of convenience are not only an environmental threat but also pose a threat to India's maritime security. A confidential report of the naval intelligence has pointed out that the D-gang is involved in most of the deals going around in the shipbreaking business.
    Full story at http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/I...ow/2762927.cms

  78. #78
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    From APP.com:

    Big ship, big opportunity[indent]
    quote:

    The state Department of Environmental Protection has an opportunity to make an enormous contribution to recreational fishing, if it acts in the next few days.

    New Jersey has a chance to obtain the Navy's 560-foot destroyer U.S.S. Radford as an addition to the state's artificial reef system, but it must file for acquisition by Feb. 13.

    Bill Figley, former head of the state's artificial reef system, said the big vessel would be a valuable addition to the system.
    For more. go to http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/art...85/1002/SPORTS

    USS Radford photo page at http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/968.htm

  79. #79
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Pakistan's ship breaking witnesses new spell of growth[indent]
    quote:

    The country's ship breaking industry is witnessing a new spell of growth as it is pacing up its productions of steel scraps with the arrival of eight new vessels since beginning of the year at Gaddani beach, ship-breakers told Daily Times. They said as many as eight large and medium sized ships have been anchored in Gaddani dockyard during the last five weeks and they could generate 25,000 to 27,000 light displacement tonnage (LDT) scrap of steel and other metals as the other two ships being under worked for the last two months. The new docked ships include Japanese Shanti having 16,000 tonne weight and Japanese Pink-1 having 6,6145 tonne weight.
    Full story at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...l&article=8822

  80. #80
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    From The Shipping Times:

    Sir Lancelot goes to breakers[indent]
    quote:

    She was built at the Fairfield shipyard in Glasgow (Now BAE Systems Govan) in 1964 and served with British forces until 1989.

    Now as GLENN BRAVEHEART the ship formerly known as SIR LANCELOT, which saw service in the Falklands campaing in 1982, is finally going to her last resting place, the breakers in Bangladesh.
    For the rest, see http://www.shippingtimes.co.uk/itm154_sirlancelot.htm

  81. #81
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    From The Navy Times:

    Navy sink list includes Forrestal, destroyers[indent]
    quote:

    The Navy plans to sink 15 decommissioned ships and scrap an additional 24 in the next five years, according to the latest shipbuilding plan.

    >snip<

    Two ships in the current plan are slated to sink and become artificial reefs, the plan notes: the Spruance-class destroyer Arthur W. Radford, which rests in Philadelphia, and the auxiliary aircraft landing training ship and former carrier Forrestal, currently berthed in Newport, R.I.
    Full story at http://www.navytimes.com/news/2008/0...posal_080223w/

    Comment: This makes me feel old if only because I remember some of these ships. I only hope that the scrapping of the Constellation and Independance don't turn into an encore performance of the Coral Sea Fiasco. See http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/43s.htm

  82. #82
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    From The Star OnLine:

    Dry-bulk vessel scrapping set to rise[indent]
    quote:

    SCRAPPING of aging ships that carry coal, iron ore and other commodities may rise because of an increase in new vessel deliveries starting this year.

    Only eight dry-bulk ships were scrapped globally last year while 88 new vessels were delivered, resulting in a 2.6% increase to 3,164 ships across the world, Precious Shipping managing director Khalid Hashim said in a filing to the Thai stock exchange.
    More at http://biz.thestar.com.my/news/story...2&sec=business

    Comment: This is the typical end result when you have excess tonnage, overaged ships, or both. Some might have gone to the breakers sooner but in light of the current demand for bottoms, it makes sense to wait for the new hulls to come into service before getting rid of the old ones.

  83. #83
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Eco-friendly ship recycling: E.R. Schiffahrt first shipping company with GL certificate [indent]
    quote:

    The containership ,E.R. Los Angeles" (currently trading as m.v. CSCL Los Angeles") is the first vessel worldwide to meet the new requirements on environment-friendly ship recycling issued by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). In a pilot project, Hamburg charter shipping company E.R. Schiffahrt – supported by Germanischer Lloyd (GL) - compiled the so-called Inventory of Hazardous Materials according to the IMO convention. This list includes all potentially environmental harmful materials which are used in ship structures or which are part of the equipment.
    For the rest, see http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...l&article=9625

    Comment: This ship isn't heading to the breakers now but in the future when her days are done, nobody will have to guess at what surprises are waiting for them. They'll know.

  84. #84
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Indian ship recycling yards on the route to infrastructure and quality practice improvements[indent]
    quote:

    The Indian Shiprecycling Industry at Alang has long been the subject of discussions with several leading publications claiming that this Industry has the 'highest rate of casualties and an absolute violation of human rights occur at the shiprecycling yards'. Asian recycling yards have come a long way both in terms of infrastructure and quality and you would be surprised to learn that at the time of our last survey in Alang in early June 2007, there were 45 yards that held ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001 certifications with an additional 10 yards pursuing them.
    Full story at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...&article=10031

  85. #85
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    From BIMCO:

    Feature: IMO faces critical policy decisions on ship recycling[indent]
    quote:

    When it meets at the end of this month, the International Maritime Organization’s marine environment protection committee (MEPC) will have to take the proverbial plunge and build a consensus on the consolidated draft texts pertaining to two major regulatory regimes. These concern, respectively, the new International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships and the revision of two existing instruments pertaining to the control and reduction of ships’ atmospheric emissions.

    The political as well as technical complexity of the comprehensive revision of the Marine Pollution (MARPOL) Convention’s Annex VI concerning sulphur oxide emissions and the release of particulate matter - and of the associated mandatory technical code on nitrogen oxide emissions - is such that further extensive discussions are expected at the committee’s 57th session (MEPC 57, 31 March - 4 April 2008).
    The somewhat lengthy story is at http://www.bimco.org/Members%20Area/...e_Week_10.aspx

    Comment: As you can see, action is being taken by people who know the ground and understand the problems. Whether or not it will go anywhere is anybody's guess, but they are trying.

  86. #86
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    From InRich.com:

    Another Ghost Fleet ship leaves today
    Very brief story at http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.a...3-13-0230.html

  87. #87
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    From BYM:

    U.S. EPA files complaint against ship brokers for violations of Toxic Substances Control Act[indent]
    quote:

    Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a federal complaint against Global Shipping and Global Marketing Systems, Inc. for distribution in commerce and export of PCB-containing materials on the MV Oceanic, formerly the SS Independence, a ship being sent by Global to be scrapped overseas.

    Fines against these two companies may be assessed up to $32,500 per violation per day. The MV Pacific Hickory is towing the MV Oceanic to its final destination.
    More at http://www.bymnews.com/news/newsDetails.php?id=23988

  88. #88
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Ships sail to scrap yards via legal loophole[indent]
    quote:

    Today at least 189 oceangoing vessels of all types, 25 years old or older, fly the US flag. Ships of that vintage – from tankers to container ships – typically contain tons of asbestos, PCBs, and other toxic chemicals, far above US regulatory maximums. Where these ships go to be recycled will depend, however, on how well US regulators coordinate with one another in order to enforce existing laws restricting PCB exports.
    More at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...&article=10880

  89. #89
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    From The Palm Beach Post:

    Outdoors: Former Navy destroyer available to be used as artificial reef[indent]
    quote:

    It looks like a long shot, but Palm Beach County environmental officials want to buy the USS Arthur W. Radford, a 563-foot destroyer, to create an artificial reef and diving destination, likely somewhere in southern Palm Beach County.

    Members of the county's Artificial Reef and Estuarine Enhancement Committee voted March 13 to draft a letter of intent expressing interest in the Radford, a decommissioned Navy ship. They also talked about teaming with Broward County to raise the estimated $3 million needed to clean, tow and sink the destroyer.
    More at http://www.palmbeachpost.com/sports/...oors_0323.html

  90. #90
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Price of old breakable ships soars to $750 LTD[indent]
    quote:

    The prices of scrap-producing breakable ships surged sharply by $250 per light displacement tonnage (LTD) toreach at record level of $750 LTD in the international market during the last two weeks, hampering theworking pace of the local industry, ship breakers told Daily Times. Ship breakers attributed the higher prices of breakable ships to the increasing demand of the steel coupled with the high fuel oil in the prices during the last three months.
    More at http://www.shippingeconomics.gr/content/view/2440/31/

  91. #91
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    From The American Shipper:

    Scrapping company responds to EPA complaint[indent]
    quote:

    A Maryland company that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said last week plans to improperly scrap the former passenger liner Independence overseas, said "all approvals and permissions required for the vessel to depart USA were duly obtained prior to the sailing of the vessel."
    The administrative complaint was filed by the EPA because it alleges the Independence, now known as the Oceanic, was allegedly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls or PCBs.
    Full story at http://www.americanshipper.com/SNW_story.asp?news=88867

  92. #92
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    From inRich.com:

    2 more Ghost Fleet ships sold[indent]
    quote:

    NEWPORT NEWS -- The skyrocketing cost of steel continues to help federal officials whittle away at the James River Reserve Fleet.

    The U.S. Maritime Administration said yesterday that two more "Ghost Fleet" ships have been sold for scrap.
    More at http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news/s...3-25-0175.html

  93. #93
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Scrap steel prices are up – CMC[indent]
    quote:

    Commercial Metals Co said this week that prices for the scrap metals it sells are up significantly in the quarter ended February 29th 2008.
    More at http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...2968&Itemid=79

    Comment: This has been an upward trend for quite some time now, which is good news for those who recycle old ships.

  94. #94
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    Michael

    And bad news for the old ships. While we'll all regret some of the older liners going for scrap, I hope this will hasten the scrapping of single hull tankers, and no one will regret those going.

  95. #95
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    >>And bad news for the old ships.<<

    Depends on the ship. For a lot of them, it amounts to little more then putting them out of their misery. The Ghost Fleet which keeps coming up for example. Nearly all of them are grotesquely overaged, of little practical use, and in very poor condition. Their disposal is long overdue.

  96. #96
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    Michael, I should have said "and bad news for the old liners". As for the ghost fleet, I've seen pictures of both the CA and James River, and I agree, they should have been scrapped a long time ago. One can only think what they are leaking and shedding into the water.

    But along with them, in a perfect world, all of the single hull tankers would be lined up at Alang right now.

  97. #97
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    >>But along with them, in a perfect world, all of the single hull tankers would be lined up at Alang right now.<<

    Don't be so sure. Double hulls aren't quite the panacea they're made out to be. All else aside, they make for a substantial problem in terms of upkeep and preservation. They could be rusting from the inside out and unless you pop open that manhole cover to have a look, you'ed never know it.

  98. #98
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    From The Hellenic Shipping News:

    Ship breakers seek end to scrap pipes’ smuggling[indent]
    quote:

    The unabated smuggling of scrapped steel pipes from the former Soviet states is damaging the profitability of the Pakistani ship breaking industry and causing revenue loss to the government, ship breakers said. A growing number of re-rolling mills are buying these pipes instead of ship scrap to make mild bars. Locally called Pharra (torn) these steel pipes were used in Soviet era to supply gas. There is an international network of suppliers that excavates and ships them to regional buyers. These low quality pipes are more than 50 years old. They reach Pakistan via Afghanistan and are used in making low quality cheap mild bars.
    For the rest, go to http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...3642&Itemid=31

  99. #99
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    From Energy Current:

    Ship scrapping regulations set for overhaul[indent]
    quote:

    INTERNATIONAL: The Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) reports it has made "substantial progress" in developing the draft text of the International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, a new convention which will provide globally applicable ship recycling regulations for international shipping and for recycling activities.
    For the rest, see http://www.energycurrent.com/index.p...4&storyid=9904

  100. #100
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    From Ananova:

    Public's say over 'ghost ships'[indent]
    quote:

    The public is to have a final say into whether a company's controversial attempt to dismantle so called 'ghost ships' will go ahead, said the Environment Agency.

    The Agency has started a public consultation on a waste management licence that would allow Able UK to scrap ships at its Graythorp site in Hartlepool and dispose of or recycle their materials.
    More at http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_2811108.html

    Comment: This has been dragging on for five years now. The real irony here is that everybody who takes an interest wants ship dismantling to be environmentally friendly, but "Not in my backyard."

 

 
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