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Photo of dog in a Titanic lifeboat

This discussion on "Photo of dog in a Titanic lifeboat " is in the Real Dogs section; I can't believe what I appear to be seeing... Once again, in the same week ...

      
   
  1. #1
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    I can't believe what I appear to be seeing...

    Once again, in the same week as the wreck of a German U-boat being found at Titanic's last anchorage, I have to stress that I am not joking about this...

    I have a first generation picture of a Titanic lifeboat arriving at Carpathia, from an original negative - the resultant tiff that I have is nearly 53 Megabytes. Colossal.

    Anyway, I have found what looks to me like a dog awaiting rescue inside the lifeboat !



    Tell me I am dreaming...

    This is a late-launched lifeboat, which makes it all the more jaw-dropping to see this.

    It looks like a scruffy type of dog, not the pomeranians, pekingese or chows we're told about.

    If this is a live animal, I am absolutely staggered.

  2. #2
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    Zooming back out from the face of the "dog" -



    Titanic crewman in lifejacket to left.

  3. #3
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    Zooming back out further...



    Can anybody guess the boat yet? The picture is actually quite well known, although nobody will have it in this level of granular resolution.

  4. #4
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    The dog appears to be sitting on a thwart.

    There are lots of other hidden and amazing things to be seen in this photo in high resolution and clean-up, brightening, etc...

    But this one takes the dog biscuit.

  5. #5
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    Okay - this is Collapsible D.

    Here is another detail.



    <font size="+1">AND I'VE FOUND EVIDENCE OF A DOG BEING IN THIS BOAT!!!

    If you go onto the Michel Navratil biography on this site, towards the end, you will see this quote -


    ...."I remember the pleasure, really, of going plop! into the lifeboat. We ended up next to the daughter of an American banker who managed to save her dog - no-one objected."
    I am astounded...

    Next stop, to find the American banker's daughter...

    By the way, I can also see the curly head of the older Titanic waif in my super-huge version of this photograph.

    A dog is seen in a Titanic lifeboat for the first time... over 1,500 humans died...

    No wonder that canine looks quite pleased.

    But my main feeling is of being completely gobsmacked.

  6. #6
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    Seems the banker's daughter could be Sara Compton, who was actually transferred to D from lifeboat 14... in which case the dog was in 14 while they were beating back would-be male boarders, with Lowe later firing from 14, on its being lowered, in order to deter and discourage 'wild-eyed beasts' (of the steerage human variety) who were "ready to spring"...



    Here is a caption associated with this large Collapsible D picture. There are about twelve names, one or two indecipherable.

    The above is an extract. It says that the occupants of D included -

    "Navratil children
    Miss Compton in stern - transferred from No. 14."

    Any other candidates?

  7. #7
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    It was quite obviously and without doubt a grizzly bear.



  8. #8
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    Dogs don't tend to glow.

  9. #9
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    Does the above dog "glow" ?

    The remark is no doubt meant to be cynical, but it doesn't have any meaning.

    The above is a detail from a photograph of August 1911, showing Astor's dog in the lower right corner. We're not talking about digital detail. It's the Titanic era, but the photo I have has amazing depth nonetheless.



    (The stuff we can see, if we look closely...)

    This snout in Collapsible D [you do accept it's Collapsible D and not a cloud?] is not a blemish... it just hasn't been picked up on before.

    If Michel Navratil is right, that a dog was in his boat, then it is perfectly natural that a photograph of the lifeboat should show the dog.

    I have to stress that I saw the dog first before I was aware of a claim that there was a dog in the boat. Not the other way around.

    By the way, I can also see Titanic waif Michel Navratil with his mop of curly hair in the other section of the boat. He's the one who remembers the dog - the type of thing that would particularly make an impression on a child.

    You won't have noticed him from previous printed versions of this image, because they are used too small - because of not enough resolution.

    One mustn't be too sensitive, so I must bear with the imposition of the grizzly... having grizzled myself many times.

    But perhaps you are conditioned to reject this solely because "it's been 99 years and I've never heard any suggestion of this." I do apologise for the intervening, soporific years.

    There is also the matter that Collapsible D was the very last lifeboat launched from davits - and there aren't anywhere near enough humans in it. And they took passengers from No. 14!

    "...who managed to save her dog - no-one objected..."

    The 54 steerage children who died were not asked if they objected.

  10. #10
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    Senan,
    I know that you are serious about this and I appreciate this kind of research. But I would like to caution against the quick conclusion that just because a part of the photograph looks like one thing it must be that thing.
    What makes me doubt that this photo shows a dog is that the edge contrast at the 'muzzle' seems to be higher than at every other location, even the transitions between the dark clothing and the life preservers. This lack of edge contrast appearing as fuzziness is caused by grain and focusing imperfections during the initial exposure of the negative and again later during exposure of the positives and should affect everything we see in the lifeboat equally. The edge contrast is invariably reduced with every exposure or reproduction step. I do not know what it is or what it is not, but if it had been introduced after the exposure of the negative, this could explain the higher edge contrast in this image area.



 

 
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