Futrelle Met Death Like Hero Says Wife

Worcester Telegram

New York, April 19.- Mrs. May Futrelle, whose husband, Jacques Futrelle, the short story writer and novelist, went down with the ship, was met here by her daughter, Miss. Virginia Futrelle, who was brought to New York, from the convent of Notre Dame in Baltimore. Miss. Futrelle had been told that her father had been picked up by another steamer. Mrs. Charles Copeland of Boston, a sister of the writer, who also met Mrs. Futrelle was under the same impression. Miss. Futrelle and Mrs. Copeland with a party of friends awaited at a hotel the arrival of Mrs. Futrelle from the dock.

"I am so happy that father is safe too," declared Miss. Futrelle, as her mother clasped her in her arms. The girl and Mrs. Copeland alone of the party did not know that Mr. Futrelle was dead. It was some time before Mrs. Futrelle could compose herself.

"Where is Jack?" Mrs. Copeland asked.

Mrs. Futrelle was afraid to let her daughter know the truth.

"Oh, he is on another ship," Mrs Futrelle replied.

Mrs. Copeland then guessed at the truth and became hysterical, Miss. Futrelle also broke down.

" Jack died like a hero." Mrs. Futrelle said, when the party became composed. "He was in the smoking room when the crash came- the noise of the smash was terrific- and I was going to bed. I was hurled from my feet by the impact. I hardly found myself when Jack came rushing into the stateroom. The boat is going down, get dressed at once, he shouted. When we reached the deck, everything was in the wildest confusion."

"Jacques is dead, but he died like a hero. That I know. Three or four times after the crash I rushed up to him and clasped him in my arms and begged him to get into one of the boats."

"For God's sake go" he fairly screamed at me as he tried to push me away and I could see how he suffered. It's your last chance, go. Then one of the ship's officers forced me into a lifeboat and I gave up all hope that he could be saved."

"The screams of women and the shrill orders of the officers were drowned intermittently by the tremendous vibrations of the Titanic's deep bass fog horn. The behavior of the men was magnificent. They stood back without murmuring and urged the women and children to get into the lifeboats. A few cowards tried to scramble into the boats but they were quickly thrown back by the others. Let me say now that the only men who were saved were those who sneaked into the lifeboats or were plucked up after the Titanic sunk."

"I did not want to leave Jack but he assured me that there were boats enough for all and that he would be rescued later."

"Hurry up May, your keeping the others waiting were his last words as he lifted me into a lifeboat and kissed me goodbye. I was in one of the last lifeboats to leave the ship. We had not put on many minutes when the Titanic disappeared. I almost saw as I saw her sink that I could see Jack standing where I had left him and waving at me."

Mrs. Futrelle said that she saw the parting of Col. John Jacob Astor and his young bride, Mrs. Astor was frantic. Her husband had to jump into the lifeboat four times and tell her that he would be rescued later. After the fourth time, Mrs. Futrelle said, he jumped back on the deck of the sinking ship and the lifeboat bearing his bride made off."

Related Biographies:

John Jacob Astor
Madeleine Talmage Astor
Jacques Heath Futrelle
Lily May Futrelle

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Julie Dowen

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