1912 FRANCE


Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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France (1912) in NYC 3/21/31.
77812.jpg
 
Mar 20, 2007
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http://www.gjenvick.com/CGT-FrenchLine/1912-SteamshipFrance.html

Here is a great link - albeit featuring some creaky translation! - with more information and pictures relating to the France of 1912 than I've ever seen before.

I think it is probably fair to say that she is the least-known of all the four-funnel liners which sailed in the period immediately prior to the Great War - certainly compared to her Cunard and White Star contemporaries. I know that she was considerably smaller than her British and German rivals; but I've also read that she was a very popular ship, combining speed with both luxury and comfort. Her interiors, if a little over-done for my taste, display considerable originality and are, indeed, very 'French' in appearance. She wasn't called 'the Chateau of the Atlantic' for nothing! Her embarkation hall is something else; the impact in 'full colour' (so to speak) must have been pretty striking.

I gather that her maiden voyage in the spring of 1912 was rather over-shadowed by the sinking of the Titanic, and that several survivors - I think Norris Williams was one - were booked to sail on her for their return journey to Europe.
 

mozartbeatle

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Aug 7, 2009
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However the ship had stability problems and during her maiden voyage she broke expensive china. She was not only the biggest french liner afloat, but also the first one fitted with turbines and had luxuries such as suites with their own dinning room.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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The woodwork from her grand salon was sold off, in 1934, and used by its purchaser to erect a Louis XIV hog barn. The ornmentation faced inwards, and so was not exposed to the weather for the next 60 years. I saw one of the preserved portions of it, back in 1996, when the idea of building a CGT museum was being tossed around.
 
Oct 31, 2008
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Excellent reference site Martin. Super glad that you posted that. The France is my favorite four funneler. Her appearance is just yacht-like and of them all is the most graceful, beautiful, and well crafted in my opinion.

To Jim, et al: are there any good published resources on the France. I have the book "Majesty at Sea" but the chapter devoted to the France is rather small and the photographs limited. Any other good resources I could try? I'd be interested in your knowledge.

Thanks! - D
 

Aristide

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Feb 10, 2019
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The S.S. France was the pride of our country and started her maiden voyage at 20th april 1912. Just 5 days after the Titanic sinking.

Is there any information what effect this had on the voyage? I guess it killed off most of the publicity she got at that time?

In France it was already the law that there must be enough life boats for evryone on board, so there where no changes needed in her design.

As far as i know CGT even made a last minute commercial, stating, that S.S. France is the first Ocean Liner carrying enough life boats by default.

So what is known about that? Did CGT try to react to the Titanic sinking in any way? Did they chose a more southern route? Did they try to avoid Titanics debris field?

Has anyone knowledge about her compartments and technology regarding to prevent such a sinking?
 

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