2008 Bismarck Expedition James Cameron


Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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From Newsweek.com:

Spying On The Bismarck
'Titanic' Director James Cameron Dives To Film Another Historic Wreck


quote:

In May 1941, Germany sent its mammoth new battleship Bismarck into the North Atlantic. In its first action, it sank the Hood, the flagship of the British fleet, killing all but three of its 1,418-man crew. But three days later, in one of the decisive naval battles of World War II, the British launched an all-out assault on the Bismarck, and it went down to its three-mile-deep grave. Only 115 of its 2,221-man crew survived. Director James Cameron, best known for his megahit "Titanic," led an expedition to the Bismarck in May.

For the rest, go to http://www.newsweek.com/id/66758/page/1
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Whoa! This should be interesting. The work they did the last time Jim C. went out there was pretty good. I wonder if on some level, he may have missed his true calling.

According to the article, the special on this is supposed to air on December 8th. I'll have my DVR ready to record it.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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What might be even more impressive would be Cameron exploring the "Hood".

So many other ships have gone down in deep water with locations precisely known, particularly broken tankers and other cargo vessels. It would be interesting to see those as well. The "Edmund Fitzgerald" strikes me as having unbelievable cinema-graphic possibilities and plenty of "cache" with public recognition. John, I'm happy to assist! You know how to find me!
 
Apr 3, 2005
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Except in the case of the Edmund fitzgerald, all he could do would be to film the outside of it, as no one is allowed inside the wreck.
Probably would be interesting though even so.
Would love to see someone find the Waratah or the Marine sulphur queen though. Or maybe even a search of the Mount Temple.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>What might be even more impressive would be Cameron exploring the "Hood". <<

Bring it on. With the location of the wreck known, it's not like they have to go to the trouble of searching for it. The only fly in this ointment is that there may not be a whole lot which is recognizable. Main magazine explosions seldom leave much.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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There is an excellent site on the "Hood", with which you may be familiar. Much of the ship remains recognizable, and even helps to explain the rapid sinking with forensic clarity. There remain many, many, seaman's boots scattered about the site and aboard ship, conveying the death toll with chilling clarity. A man such as Cameron, with a sense of timeline and story, could stop time, interrupt the battle, and give the world insight into those (perhaps) 180 seconds between the hit and the Atlantic closing over "Hood". The drama could be as deep and defined as "Titanic's".
 

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