2nd Officer Stone's Interrogation.

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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I suggested nothing of the kind. I suggested that the green was invisible because the Californian wasn’t close enough to the Titanic. At the time she got close enough her green was closed, and her red was opened.
Then explain how it was that the side lights of both vessels were mutually visible by Lord, Groves, Stone and Gibson from abut 11pm April 14 until just after the Gibson saw rocket number 5 ? If those on Californian could see the other vessel's sidelights during that time, then observers on the nearbt vessel could see the lights of Californian. Had that other vessel been Titanic, then the observers on Titanic were much higher that those on Californian so could see a great deal farther.
In truth, those on the nearby vessel, saw Californian's lights from the moment that nearby vesel stopped until that vessel turned away and steamed off to the SW'ward. It is cruel to whip a "dead horse".;)
 

AlexP

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Then explain how it was that the side lights of both vessels were mutually visible by Lord, Groves, Stone and Gibson from abut 11pm April 14 until just after the Gibson saw rocket number 5 ? If those on Californian could see the other vessel's sidelights during that time, then observers on the nearbt vessel could see the lights of Californian. Had that other vessel been Titanic, then the observers on Titanic were much higher that those on Californian so could see a great deal farther.
In truth, those on the nearby vessel, saw Californian's lights from the moment that nearby vesel stopped until that vessel turned away and steamed off to the SW'ward. It is cruel to whip a "dead horse".;)
The only explanation is that for one reason or another the Californian’s navigational lights were not as bright as the Titanic’s. I’ve read Samuel’s article about lenses that the Titanic’s masthead light had. It’s reasonable to assume that The Californian, older and smaller steamer had no such lenses as the Titanic did. Maybe there was not enough current to make the lights bright enough. When at 4 a.m. Mr. Stone saw the lights of another steamer either the Mount Temple or the Carpathia, nobody from these two spotted the Californian. Her lights were not bright enough. Maybe even Californian’s masthead lights had different brightness. At first Mr. Boxhall saw one light only, and then he saw the second, when she cot closer.
 
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Jim Currie

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The only explanation is that for one reason or another the Californian’s navigational lights were not as bright as the Titanic’s. I’ve read Samuel’s article about lenses that the Titanic’s masthead light had. It’s reasonable to assume that The Californian, older and smaller steamer had no such lenses as the Titanic did. Maybe there was not enough current to make the lights bright enough. When at 4 a.m. Mr. Stone saw the lights of another steamer either the Mount Temple or the Carpathia, nobody from these two spotted the Californian. Her lights were not bright enough. Maybe even Californian’s masthead lights had different brightness. At first Mr. Boxhall saw one light only, and then he saw the second, when she cot closer.
if the queen of Britain had been born a man, she would have been their King. I'm outta here!
 
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AlexP

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May 23, 2019
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if the queen of Britain had been born a man, she would have been their King. I'm outta here!
It all depends. 300 years ago a first-born daughter of the King would not have been the Queen, to begin with, if the King had a son too.
The visibility of the Californian's navigational lights depended on their brightness.

I'm outta here!
It's one of the best arguments when there's nothing else left to say.