30th Anniversary of Fitzgerald Sinking

Dec 4, 2000
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A special ceremony honoring the lost crew of the Edmund Fitzgerald and all sailors lost on the Great Lakes will be held Thursday evening, November 10th aboard the museum ship SS Willis B. Boyer in Toledo, Ohio.

Many of the crew on the Fitz came from Toledo or the area around the city. The keynote speaker will be Tom Walton who actually served on the ship at one time and who lost a relative in the sinking. Following Walton's talk there will be a presentation of the new play "10 November" by Steven Dietz. The play will be presented on the deck of the Boyer, but a heated tent will thoughtfully be provided.

Of course, the event will start off at 7 p.m. with a wreath laying and a bell tolling once for each of the lost men on the Fitz.

The Boyer is located in International Park on the east side of the Maumee River. Take I-75 to the Front Street exit and go east past the grain elevators. A sign for International park is on your left. If you miss it, keep going to Main Street (a corner with Wendy's and McDonald's) and turn left. Turn left again at the light after going under the railroad bridge.

The Boyer will be open at 5:30 p.m. for tours. There will be a charge to pay for the play and the cost of the tent.

-- David G. Brown
 
Nov 30, 2000
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Peace be to the souls of the 29 men of the Fitzgerald. November 10th, 1975, November 10th, 2005.
30 years on.
My thoughts and prayers go out to their families and friends this day.

Richard Krebes
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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Chris, in the cnn.com story (see above), the picture images series includes a picture of the Edmund Fitzgerald.
 
May 3, 2002
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Wellington, New Zealand
Over here the 10th was yesterday and without thinking what date it was I took Gales of November to work and read a key section of it.
It is only now I realise that at 7pm last night I
was on my dinner break and reading Ch 13. The same time when the ship went under all those years ago.
To me that's uncanny.

We are always small on the sea.

Martin Cahill
Wellington,
New Zealand
 
Apr 27, 2005
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Nice pencil art of the wreckage. I wonder if anyone has sketched the actual folding up of the ship as the hull gave up? If I understand it correctly, she folded up like a man's wallet and just went under in seconds.
Remarkable thing, that at such extreme depth and cold, fresh water, the "Fitz" will remain as we see her today for perhaps hundreds of years. Had it not been for Gordon Lightfoot, most of us would note the wreck only in passing. Tremendous story from the viewpoint of those lost and those who suddenly realized she was gone.
 

Erik Wood

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Apr 10, 2001
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For the past few years I have written something about the Fitz....this year I think it worth noting that 30 years in somewhat modern times, we lost a brave crew, a good ship and out of that came the birth of Maritime Investigation in a modern sense.
 
Feb 7, 2005
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This thread began with an announcement by Dave Brown of a ceremony to be held on the SS Willis B. Boyer museum ship in Toledo, Ohio, to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald. If anyone would like to see pictures from that memorial program, please go to the following web site: http://www.glts.org/

On the left side of the home page click on the link, "SS Boyer in Toledo Honors 30th Anniversary of Fitz".

Denise
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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FYI: I think I found an upcoming indirect tribute to the Edmund Fitzgerald.
See the US Postal Service page detailing the 2006 stamp issues: http://www.usps.com/communications/news/stamps/2005/sr05_054.htm#bg

Among the stamps is a series called "Wonders of America: Land of Superlatives" (various places and items that are either the largest, tallest, highest, deepest, oldest of their kind), and set to come out around April or May.
Included in that series is:
"Largest Lake: Lake Superior:
The largest of the five Great Lakes, Superior shares waters with Canada and covers a surface area of about 31,700 square miles. Lake Superior is approximately 350 miles long; its maximum depth is 1,333 feet".
The stamp of Lake Superior (can be seen when one clicks the links to each stamp) shows a waving breaking on the shore, with a carrier ship in the background. I will wager that that is a rendering of the Edmund Fitzgerald.
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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I hope this image (taken from a United States Post Office site) comes in. I cut off the price listed. This stamp will be available in the United States after May 27th, as part of a stamp series, called "Wonders of America" (superlatives used: largest, longest, highest, tallest, deepest, oldest, fastest, etc).

Question: this is a tribute to Lake Superior (see my previous post), which our largest lake. Is the ship in the distance supposed to be the Edmund Fitzgerald? I think it is.
101837.jpg


One can view the stamp series at both
http://shop.usps.com/cgi-bin/vsbv/postal_store_non_ssl/browse_content/stampReleaseDisplay.jsp?OID=8666 and
http://www.usps.com/communications/news/stamps/2005/sr05_054.htm

The latter site gives a description of the components of the applicable stamp series.
 
Feb 7, 2005
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John, I don't think the vessel used on the stamp is the Fitz. Take a look at the photos of her on this webpage: http://www.mhsd.org/fleet/O/On-Columbia/fitz/default.htm

You can click on any of the photos on the right side of the page to see an enlarged version.

First difference you'll notice are the livery colors of the Columbia fleet, a rust red hull with a cream superstructure. The stack has a different shape and color (it's hard to see the color of the stamp vessel's stack, but it looks dark with no mid-level yellow stripe with the distinctive Columbia star). The aft deckhouses of the stamp vessel appear somewhat different as well. The forward deckhouses don't appear to have the look of the Fitzgerald, either. The Fitz had very distinctive overhangs that extended over the decks below them.

Take a look at the pictures at the link above and see what you think...

Denise
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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First off, thanks for the Link, Denise. I checked it out, and saw the images of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

I have attached a "ship-only" image that I was able to make, and the full stamp image, which I was able to copy off of http://www.usps.com/communications/news/stamps/2005/sr05_054.htm (our Postal authorities will likely be fully aware of ways individuals may try to alter the postal images to counterfeit stamp issues)
101860.jpg
101861.jpg


I admit that when I saw this stamp image (the series will be available in US Post Offices after May 27th) I immediately thought of the Edmund Fitzgerald, and its connection to the terrible storms that can occur on Lake Superior. It is possible that the Postal Service chose to note the fact that Lake Superior is a major transit corridor with all the freighter traffic over the years.
 

Erik Wood

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Apr 10, 2001
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To me that almost looks like a Cleveland Cliff's Ship. Black hull and wh at appears to be a green superstructure with a black funnel.
 
Feb 7, 2005
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You could be right, Erik. The forward end kinda' does look like the old Cliffs' flagship Edward B. Greene, which was build in the mid-'50s. The aft end, however, looks like something pre-WWII. John (i.e., my John!) thinks it has the look of a Canadian boat--but once again you have the problem of a modern deckhouse arrangement forward and a stovepipe stack aft. Looks like a straight-decker, too, which favors it being Canadian.

It's possible the Post Office digitally combined the forward end of one boat with the aft end of another, creating a generic vessel meant to represent the large amount of ship traffic that transits Superior, the "Largest Lake."

Denise