3rd Class Dining Rooms

  • Thread starter David Matthew Stewart (Titanicus)
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David Matthew Stewart (Titanicus)

Guest
How exactly did the Steerage passengers aboard the ship get to the Dining room? When i look over the deck plans (F-deck) on this site, I see that you come off the stairs, (in the aft. end of the ship) and then there are no corridors leading from the berths of F-deck, to the Dining room. They are blocked off in the middle by second class quarters, from what I remember. So, how exactly did they get there?
 
Dec 13, 1999
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I think that third class passengers who had their staterooms on F-deck and G-deck were required to take the stairs to E-deck (on Scotland Road, I think), where they had some of their quarters, and then to went to the main staircase, which leaded to the dining saloon. The dining room was separated for forward passengers and aft passengers. (women on one side and men on the other, except for the families). Regards,
 
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Prissy

Guest
We're doing a research project for the Titanic at school and one of the questions I have to answer is how was the tables set and food displayed. If anyone knows how any of the dining room tables were set and food displayed, please answer my question.
 
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Stefan Christiansson

Guest
How did 3rd class passengers get to the dining saloon on F-deck? Did they use Scotland road on E-deck? Where was the food for 3rd class prepared? Seems the 3rd class galley is a bit small to prepare food for so many people. How did they get the food from the storage on G-deck to the 3rd class galley?
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Nov 14, 2000
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Stefan:

Both 3rd Class dining rooms were entered by stairs on the centerline just off Scotland Road. The galley size for 3rd class is regulated by law and probably exceeds that minimum. Galley size for this period is mostly determined by menu complexity, not so much the volume of food that needs to be prepared.

For example, a glance at third class menus show very uncomplicated foods such as stews that can be prepared by a small number of people. In first class every food item may have several components, each requiring its own cook because all elements have to come together at the same time for service and almost nothing can be prepared in advance.

As for food transport: it was lugged in. Nothing nice like the hoists in first class.

Bill Sauder
 
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Stefan Christiansson

Guest
So Scotland Road was used both by crew and third class passengers?
 

Bill Sauder

Member
Nov 14, 2000
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Yes, it was a troublesome arrangement and later ships that had service corridors like Scotland Road were for use of the crew only.

Bill Sauder
 

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