A Big Shindig in Topeka KS on December 3rd through the 7th


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Jul 9, 2000
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Erik, I'll be looking forward to it. The only cautionary is I'll have to double check to make sure I have the vacation time available in February. (Since I hired on with Lowes in the month of March, I don't know how things carry over.)

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Hello Erik, George, Michael, David and everyone else,

Looks like this Shindig thing grew a little while I was in Las Vegas attending my sister's wedding. February sounds good to me. While you were away Erik I really wondered about this thing but am glad to see it is still going on.

Teri
 

Erik Wood

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Things are coming right along. Any of you who are interested should plan on bringing the following:

1. Transcripts of both Inquires
2. Deck Plans of Titanic
3. Plenty of pencils and pens as well as note pads.
4. Patients.
5. Any Naval Architecture books that you think may be of help.
6. Your imagination as well as you "seamans logic".
7. I will have my pipe and suspect that Mike will too.

That should about do it. I am sure more will come up eventually. The dates should be forth coming tomorrow or by the end of the week.

Any questions feel free to ask.

Erik
 

Tracy Smith

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Nov 5, 2000
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Too bad it isn't after April 1st. I don't get any more vacation time until then.

Oh, well. I'm not sure if I could have scared up the money for the trip, anyway. Sigh. :-(
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Tracy,

Don't feel too bad, my finances just picked up this past month or two, but I do have lots of vacation time to take. I'll take as many notes as I can and if you want, I'll send them to you. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, I'm attending to learn more of the technical aspects of the ship and will be listening with biggggggg ears. Anyways, there's always the Convention in April where I can hopefully see you there.

Teri
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Erik,

Good, the more ears, the better.

So, is David Brown attending or not? I haven't really read that he is definitely coming or not. Although I've picked around in his book, I'd love to hear his grounding theory in person. Yes, that would be great.

So, what'll it be Mr. Brown?

Teri
 
Oct 28, 2000
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Maybe-- and that's definite. You can quote me. You know I will make every effort to get there, provided my budget allows. Writers are paid less these days than airport security guards.

-- David G. Brown
 
Apr 7, 2001
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David Brown,

Well, I really hope you make it. I want to meet you and hear your story of Titanic's grounding. Plus, I can't quite make out some of that real technical lingo jingo in your book and need some help.
proud.gif


Teri
 
Oct 28, 2000
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Technical lingo? If you can't understand something, then I did not accomplish the primary task of a writer--communication. Please feel free to ask questions either on this forum or in a private e-mail. I'll do my best to answer.

Ships do have a "private" language. Most people are surprised you can't walk on a floor or drive a truck. But, I digress....(as usual).

-- David G. Brown
 
Apr 7, 2001
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David,

You did a great job on your book, even includes a nice glossary which becomes very handy.

Part of the "technical lingo jingo" I was referring to was of a drawing on page 209 spelling out the fact that Titanic "grounded" the ice shelf up to the bottom of hold number 1. I am wondering if you're proposing in that drawing that the grounding sliced through the ship that high? Also, the ice shelf portrayed in this particular drawing doesn't portray the ice to be very sharp. If the ice did penetrate the ship that deep into Titanic, then the ice would have had to have been quite sharp, would it not?

I don't mean to be so picky with details, but I design forms all day long (and maintain the company's database) so I pay very close attention to details. Sorry if I sound petty but I am truly interested in your theory.

Also, on page 211 you say, "The ship's taffrail log indicated a speed of 22.25 knots." What is a "taffrail log?" I thought no one had ever found a log from the Titanic in all the dives to the wreck.

Teri
 
Oct 28, 2000
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Re the drawings -- they were done quite separately from the manuscript by another person whom I have never met. We got them late and I agreed to let them run because they are close to my concepts at the time. In any new version they will be redone.

A "log" is, technically speaking, a device for measuring the speed of a vessel. It originated with a piece of wood (hence "log") tossed overboard at the bow. The time it took for the piece to reach the stern was a gauge of the boat's speed. Later, a triangular piece of wood was devized that was attaced to a light line just a bit heavier than twine. This "chip" would be tossed astern and would stand upright where it would pull the string off a reel. An officer would feel knots in the string and count the number that passed during a specified duration. That was the ship's speed in knots--nautical miles per hour.

So that the speed would not be forgotten, it was recorded in a book of the log...or log book. We now say "the log" to mean that book, although technically it refers to the piece of wood or chip trailed astern.

By Titanic's time, a mechanical device called either a "patent log" or a "taffrail log" was in use. These names refer to the same item. It was a meter that counted rotations of a propeller (usually called the "fish") which trailed astern. So many rotations registered as a nautical mile. The term "patent" refers to the fact that these devices were covered by various patent numbers. "Taffrail" refers to the back rail of the ship to which the meter was usually attached.

So, when Captain Kirk on the starship Enterprise says, "Captain's log," he's really talking about a very old-fashioned piece of wood.

--David G. Brown
 
Mar 18, 2000
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Wow, Thanks for the history lesson, David! Though I may have heard about the original version of 'log', I hadn't heard (or thought about) the rest of it!
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Dear David,

Boy, I sure got more than I bargained for on that post!

Thank you very much. If I find any more questions, would you mind if I posted them?

Sincerely,

Teri
 
Oct 28, 2000
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Teri & All-- Ask any questions you want. I have an unending supply of answers. Sometimes, my answers even fit the questions! I'm just waiting for the day somebody asks why the Greeks greased their pants...

--David G. Brown
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Dear David,

I see that your sense of humor is intact. How I love that.

Okay, may I be so bold as to bring your attention back to the ice for a moment? I know you said in any new version they will be redone but I just have a quick question for you.

Sharpness of the iceberg has never been a topic of conversation but I do have a certain attention on it and would like to address it briefly. Wouldn't the iceberg have to have a certain sharpness in order to penetrate the ship up to Hold #1? Afterall, it is penetrating through thick steel. Or is force more an impacting factor?

From Teri
 

Erik Wood

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Aug 24, 2000
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Oh, boy PLEASE don't ask Dave to tell the greek story again. PLEASE!!! Dave are you coming or not????

He does have a lot of answers, which leaves me to the belief that he is full of S&*^. Oh, boy I don't want to hear the greek story again.

Erik
 
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