A GREAT line/scene from "Titanic" (1997) I missed


JTDillon

Member
Apr 3, 2020
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Hello everyone! I just finished watching "Titanic" (1997) and I wanted to talk about a certain scene that caught my attention. I've seen the film approx. 6 times and I never really gave this specific scene any thought until now. If you'd like to read some pretentious nonsense you came to the perfect place!
Full disclosure: I am writing under the influence (WUI), which probably explains why I'm writing this in the first place. Please keep that in mind going forward.

Before I begin this train wreck of a post I am actually curious if anyone else might have a particular scene or dialogue that kind of stuck with them from the film. The scene I'm referring to is close to the very end of the film [[ I will include a link to the scene at the end of this post]], it takes place just after Rose finishes telling her story to the crew of the research vessel; Brock Lovett (the lead researcher played by Bill Paxton) at this point knows he isn't going to find the Heart of the Ocean which means the entire expedition he put together is now a bust - he wont be able to repay his investors etc. so we can only imagine how disappointed and stressed he would be. Brock and "Lizzy" (Rose's granddaughter) are standing together on the deck of the research vessel and Brock throws his celebratory cigar (he was saving for when he found the necklace) into the ocean, Lizzy tells Brock she is sorry because she thought (like most of us in the audience) he was throwing his cigar out of frustration/pity/anger but then he says to her: "Three years I've thought of nothing except Titanic, but I never got it, I never let it in.".
If you watch Brocks face in the scene, observe his body language and listen to the tone of his voice you realize he isn't throwing his cigar out of frustration because he didn't find his treasure (what most people would assume knowing his character motivation), its almost like he's feeling shame because he was treating this entire scenario as a quick pay day but now, because of Rose, he finally understands the tragedy. He spent years obsessing over the ship; Facts, maps, quotes, treasure, stories, blueprints..... but he "never got it", the one thing was was most important: the loss of 1,517 human souls.

This scene always seemed pretty inconsequential, the kind of scene I wouldn't even remember. Before I go on I'm curious if anyone else remembers this scene off the top of their heads?

Then this led me to think about his transformation as a character, not only him, the entire crew who got to hear Rose's story and how it changed them.

=> You have the granddaughter, Lizzy, who sees her grandma as many of us see our elders, an old boring feeble woman that she has to babysit and take care of because she cant be trusted on her own. She doesn't put a lot of weight into what Rose says, being somewhat 'dismissive' of her because she is an old lady. Its easy to see the elderly this way, its hard to imagine they were young once too. Subconsciously you kind of think of them as always being 'old' (as silly as it sounds) so you think of them as 'square' or out of touch. I am doing a terrible job of articulating this. Its okay, I doubt anyone is still reading at this point anyway. I just mean to say she completely 'underestimates' her grandmother, for now.

=> You have Brock, a 'treasure hunter' who initially only wants to use Rose. You would think he would love a chance to talk with a Titanic survivor and learn about the ship but when he meets her its clear he is simply waiting for the first opportunity to start fishing info from her. When she initially tries to tell her story and answer questions he gets impatient with her, wants to rush her and just wants to find out what happened with the necklace! He doesn't seem to be interested in her experiences whatsoever. He seems skeptical of her because of her age - we see him and Bodine exchange glances and roll their eyes in certain situations. All he wants is the money and info but has to put up with this old bag in the mean time.

=> Lewis Bodine, this is the gentleman and scholar who shows Rose the Titanic sinking simulation on the computer and narrates it to her. Incase you dont remember the scene here is an excerpt: "...finally she's got her whole ass sticking up in the air - And that's a big ass, we're talking 20-30,000 tons. Okay? And the hull's not designed to deal with that pressure, so what happens? "KRRRRRRKKK!" She splits." , the entire time he is completely obnoxious and treats the entire presentation as if he is explaining a cartoon from Sunday newspaper for a cheap laugh. He shows no respect whatsoever, not to the Titanic or to Rose who is a survivor, he doesn't need to be walking on egg shells, but he shouldn't be doing this either. This just reinforces how 'detached' they are from the reality of the human tragedy Titanic was, even with a survivor right in front of them. While Rose is explaining how her and Jack first meet (when she tries to jump off the back of the ship ) he makes a joke, "Wait a second. You were going to kill yourself by jumping off of the Titanic?! He then laughs out loud to her face and says "All you had to do was wait two days!".

=> Bobby Buell, the other guy who was present for most of the story. He seems to be a 'partner' in this operation or someone who deals with investors and finance, he was, surprisingly, also only interested in Rose for the intel on the necklace because he was only focused on the expedition and the profits... You get the idea. They don't want to hear about what it was like to be on Titanic, the experience of it coming from an eye witness, they just want that cash money.

But, as Rose tells more and more of her story we occasionally see scenes with them becoming more and more interested, more involved and invested, eventually they're hanging on every word she says. Now they have formed that human connection to the tragedy. The characters attitudes and behaviors change quite a bit by the time Rose finishes her tale.

=>Lizzy finds out her grandma not only survived the Titanic, she lived through a time when women were actually oppressed and was essentially married off for money, she jumped back ONTO a sinking ship for love, she was a free spirit, was young and beautiful... She sees her grandma in a completely different light after hearing her grandmas story and for any of you who have had a moment like that with either your parents/grandparents you know how powerful and 'moving' that can be. It simply cant be put into words. If you don't understand I would recommend making time to sit down with your elders one day (if you can) and learn about their history. Talking to my father about Vietnam and my grandfather about WW2 ( my grandfather fought in the Wehrmacht) changed not only the way I saw them, but the way I saw myself in a strange way. Did I mention I'm intoxicated?

=>Brock and the crew slowly seem to forget about the project deadlines & investors, by the end of Rose's story the necklace and money seemed to be the last things on their minds. They were 100% engrossed in her story, the human connection. Lewis' demeanor and attitude toward Rose & Titanic completely changes. He no longer makes crude jokes, he speaks to her with respect, he seems humbled by the entire experience.

And this brings us to the scene with Brock... I just appreciated how he grew as a character and that's not something you really think about when watching the film because he was in no way a "main character". I thought it was a nice touch, and I thought his line was profound.... I bet there a lot of people who consider the Titanic a hobby but are like Brock; They spend years learning about it, playing games where they sink the Titanic, drawing photos......but they don't actually get it. They haven't yet had a moment where they legitimately understood the tragic loss of life and what it must have been like that night. It somehow feels like pop culture has somehow separated the tragedy from the Titanic for most people.

The movie did a good job of capturing the disaster, its hard to truly wrap your mind around things like that. Id like to think a lot of people who watch the film have the same 'epiphany' that Brock had and understand the human part of the equation.




The scene I am referring to..... If you watch it tell me what you get from the scene.


 
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William Oakes

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Mar 6, 2020
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Nice, review of the film from a fresh new perspective.
Thank you for posting your thoughts.
Although, I have read many technical manuals and I am interested in the architecture and mechanics of the Great Ship, for me it has always been about the people and the lives that were lost and saved.
In so many ways, Titanic is the story of a lost city comprised of many different, yet equally interesting, people.
Although Rose and Jack are fictional, you know that there were probably people very similar to them, in many ways, on board.
No film is perfect, but James Cameron did a pretty great job on this film with what he knew back in 1997.
My biggest gripe with the film was the way that Murdock and Smith were portrayed.
Other than that I was very entertained by the story and that helped me to overlook some inaccuracies.
I appreciate your fresh perspective and I agree with you that in some small way Titanic made the character of Brock, a better person.
In some smal way, maybe Titanic makes us all, better people.
 

Charlene

Member
May 5, 2001
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It's a great review. Reading this, I thought about the character of Lizzy. I think she's underrated. The first time I watched the film I wondered what did se think about her grandmother when she told her story. But now I think there are a lot of things we don't know about our grandparents. And a lot of them have / had an amazing story to tell but we are too busy to listen to it.
 
Jan 15, 2019
20
4
13
New Zealand
Hello everyone! I just finished watching "Titanic" (1997) and I wanted to talk about a certain scene that caught my attention. I've seen the film approx. 6 times and I never really gave this specific scene any thought until now. If you'd like to read some pretentious nonsense you came to the perfect place!
Full disclosure: I am writing under the influence (WUI), which probably explains why I'm writing this in the first place. Please keep that in mind going forward.

Before I begin this train wreck of a post I am actually curious if anyone else might have a particular scene or dialogue that kind of stuck with them from the film. The scene I'm referring to is close to the very end of the film [[ I will include a link to the scene at the end of this post]], it takes place just after Rose finishes telling her story to the crew of the research vessel; Brock Lovett (the lead researcher played by Bill Paxton) at this point knows he isn't going to find the Heart of the Ocean which means the entire expedition he put together is now a bust - he wont be able to repay his investors etc. so we can only imagine how disappointed and stressed he would be. Brock and "Lizzy" (Rose's granddaughter) are standing together on the deck of the research vessel and Brock throws his celebratory cigar (he was saving for when he found the necklace) into the ocean, Lizzy tells Brock she is sorry because she thought (like most of us in the audience) he was throwing his cigar out of frustration/pity/anger but then he says to her: "Three years I've thought of nothing except Titanic, but I never got it, I never let it in.".
If you watch Brocks face in the scene, observe his body language and listen to the tone of his voice you realize he isn't throwing his cigar out of frustration because he didn't find his treasure (what most people would assume knowing his character motivation), its almost like he's feeling shame because he was treating this entire scenario as a quick pay day but now, because of Rose, he finally understands the tragedy. He spent years obsessing over the ship; Facts, maps, quotes, treasure, stories, blueprints..... but he "never got it", the one thing was was most important: the loss of 1,517 human souls.

This scene always seemed pretty inconsequential, the kind of scene I wouldn't even remember. Before I go on I'm curious if anyone else remembers this scene off the top of their heads?

Then this led me to think about his transformation as a character, not only him, the entire crew who got to hear Rose's story and how it changed them.

=> You have the granddaughter, Lizzy, who sees her grandma as many of us see our elders, an old boring feeble woman that she has to babysit and take care of because she cant be trusted on her own. She doesn't put a lot of weight into what Rose says, being somewhat 'dismissive' of her because she is an old lady. Its easy to see the elderly this way, its hard to imagine they were young once too. Subconsciously you kind of think of them as always being 'old' (as silly as it sounds) so you think of them as 'square' or out of touch. I am doing a terrible job of articulating this. Its okay, I doubt anyone is still reading at this point anyway. I just mean to say she completely 'underestimates' her grandmother, for now.

=> You have Brock, a 'treasure hunter' who initially only wants to use Rose. You would think he would love a chance to talk with a Titanic survivor and learn about the ship but when he meets her its clear he is simply waiting for the first opportunity to start fishing info from her. When she initially tries to tell her story and answer questions he gets impatient with her, wants to rush her and just wants to find out what happened with the necklace! He doesn't seem to be interested in her experiences whatsoever. He seems skeptical of her because of her age - we see him and Bodine exchange glances and roll their eyes in certain situations. All he wants is the money and info but has to put up with this old bag in the mean time.

=> Lewis Bodine, this is the gentleman and scholar who shows Rose the Titanic sinking simulation on the computer and narrates it to her. Incase you dont remember the scene here is an excerpt: "...finally she's got her whole ass sticking up in the air - And that's a big ass, we're talking 20-30,000 tons. Okay? And the hull's not designed to deal with that pressure, so what happens? "KRRRRRRKKK!" She splits." , the entire time he is completely obnoxious and treats the entire presentation as if he is explaining a cartoon from Sunday newspaper for a cheap laugh. He shows no respect whatsoever, not to the Titanic or to Rose who is a survivor, he doesn't need to be walking on egg shells, but he shouldn't be doing this either. This just reinforces how 'detached' they are from the reality of the human tragedy Titanic was, even with a survivor right in front of them. While Rose is explaining how her and Jack first meet (when she tries to jump off the back of the ship ) he makes a joke, "Wait a second. You were going to kill yourself by jumping off of the Titanic?! He then laughs out loud to her face and says "All you had to do was wait two days!".

=> Bobby Buell, the other guy who was present for most of the story. He seems to be a 'partner' in this operation or someone who deals with investors and finance, he was, surprisingly, also only interested in Rose for the intel on the necklace because he was only focused on the expedition and the profits... You get the idea. They don't want to hear about what it was like to be on Titanic, the experience of it coming from an eye witness, they just want that cash money.

But, as Rose tells more and more of her story we occasionally see scenes with them becoming more and more interested, more involved and invested, eventually they're hanging on every word she says. Now they have formed that human connection to the tragedy. The characters attitudes and behaviors change quite a bit by the time Rose finishes her tale.

=>Lizzy finds out her grandma not only survived the Titanic, she lived through a time when women were actually oppressed and was essentially married off for money, she jumped back ONTO a sinking ship for love, she was a free spirit, was young and beautiful... She sees her grandma in a completely different light after hearing her grandmas story and for any of you who have had a moment like that with either your parents/grandparents you know how powerful and 'moving' that can be. It simply cant be put into words. If you don't understand I would recommend making time to sit down with your elders one day (if you can) and learn about their history. Talking to my father about Vietnam and my grandfather about WW2 ( my grandfather fought in the Wehrmacht) changed not only the way I saw them, but the way I saw myself in a strange way. Did I mention I'm intoxicated?

=>Brock and the crew slowly seem to forget about the project deadlines & investors, by the end of Rose's story the necklace and money seemed to be the last things on their minds. They were 100% engrossed in her story, the human connection. Lewis' demeanor and attitude toward Rose & Titanic completely changes. He no longer makes crude jokes, he speaks to her with respect, he seems humbled by the entire experience.

And this brings us to the scene with Brock... I just appreciated how he grew as a character and that's not something you really think about when watching the film because he was in no way a "main character". I thought it was a nice touch, and I thought his line was profound.... I bet there a lot of people who consider the Titanic a hobby but are like Brock; They spend years learning about it, playing games where they sink the Titanic, drawing photos......but they don't actually get it. They haven't yet had a moment where they legitimately understood the tragic loss of life and what it must have been like that night. It somehow feels like pop culture has somehow separated the tragedy from the Titanic for most people.

The movie did a good job of capturing the disaster, its hard to truly wrap your mind around things like that. Id like to think a lot of people who watch the film have the same 'epiphany' that Brock had and understand the human part of the equation.




The scene I am referring to..... If you watch it tell me what you get from the scene.


I totally understand your entire essay, be it written with a few too many rums.... hmm nope, probably something more nautical... Port?

For myself the human connection was made first.
When 6 I met a lad same age, he lived with his elderly Grandparents as parents had passed away in a car crash.
We are both now 53
His Grandmother was 4 and booked to travel on the Titanic with her parents, 3 days before there was a death in the family so they didn't go.
She still had their tickets

She of course collected everything she could find, bearing in mind there was much over the decades. She moved to New Zealand and married my mates Grandfather years later.

I know the scene you refer to.

Watch this scene from about 3.45 to 4.05 mins
Brock states "oh yeah, I'm a believer"
Also in the sub at 2.05 or so
Brock curtails Lewis's remark of "why didn't you just wait two days"
Initially seems to be to not offend her, but then becomes apparent that his motivation is only to be able to glean more info from her


Never thought of the significance of the cigar like you've proposed. I always thought it was like.. That cigar one has after scoring a personal massive endeavour, romantic and otherwise, and Brock personally felt he had failed so didn't "deserve" it (for want of a better explanation).

Oh Arrrh
⚓
 

Bo Bowman

Member
Dec 23, 2019
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Worland, Wyoming
Well stated, JT. And thanks for the video clip. Haven't seen the movie in so long. Even though we all get nerdy about this ship and event, each in our own little niche, it all comes down to the human stories. We are all like the fellow reporting from the Hindenburg crash site: "Oh, the humanity!"

Maybe I should watch the movie again, this time with a bottle of scotch. I could make a game of it, taking a shot every time Rose says "Jack! Jack!"
 
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