A Hypothesis of Times Gone Wrong

Sorry, Brad for the veer-off. I'll respond to your above post as follows:

if a sequence of events do not seem to chronologically match, you are right, we have a problem.

Young Collins, like 99.9% of Day workers would set his personal time piece back the full amount. This was done for one simple reason, and that was to make sure that he did not go to work too early or too late the next morning i.e. by making sure that he was called at the proper time...1 Bell... 15 minutes before he was due on duty in the kitchens,
If the clock was partially set back 24 minute at midnight April 14, and say the impact took place at that moment. then an untouched clock would read Midnight, a fully set back one would read 11-13 am and the one that had been set back at that moment would read 11-36 pm. Applying this to Collins time we get

Time of Impact = Collins 11-15 pm April 15 time + 24
Time of Impact = Partial change time 11-39pm + 23
Time of Impact = Unchanged time 12-02 am April 14 time. (Time on the watch of Colonel Gracie)

Not only that, but the run time from Noon would be exactly 12 hours 02 minutes and, because the patent log read 260 nautical miles at impact, the average speed would be 21.6 knots. That average speed alone would back up the evidence of the three Navigators Pitman, Boxhall and Lowe Pitman gave a speed of 21.5 knots up to 7-30 pm sights.
Boxhall used an estimated average speed of 22 knots from 7-30 pm because of the minimum propeller slip due to flat calm conditions *he must have made an extra allowance to a lower speed found by calculation of the 7-30 pm sights)
5th Officer Lowe very specifically stated the ship averaged 20.95 knots from Noon until 6 pm.

As for the Lookouts: it is inconceivable that one Watchkeeper would make such a mistake... that two of them would do so is beyond belief.

Similarly, AB Osman was like the others on a 4 hour on-4 hour off rota. There is no way he would have made such a mistake. Additionally his Watch mate, Said exactly the same thing

Here is another one for you Brad. This time, Steward Alfred Crawford:
"I was on watch until 12 o'clock, and I was waiting for my relief to come up. I was to be relieved at 12 o'clock. I heard the crash, and I went out on the outer deck and saw the iceberg floating alongside."

Here's another bit of evidence for you to ponder, Brad. This from Lookout Fleet again.

"2488a. Did you get any orders to go on the boat deck?
- No, but I heard the boatswain call the other watch.
2492. Not only those that were on deck and on duty, but those below off duty?
- Yes, the watch that had just gone below.

2493. That would be at 12 o'clock; they had just gone below?
- Yes.


Incidentally, in your quote, Fleet stated "The watch was nearly over. I had done the best part of the watch up in the nest." If there had been no clock change and the time was 11-40 pm then Fleet would still have 20 + 24 = 44 minutes to serve up in the nest. But he only served another 20 minutes up there before he was relieved.

Cheers!
Nice analysis Jim
Um....Ok Lads, lets not turn this into another argument, we should be giving B-Rad a virtual pat on the back for his work, not squabbling as we usually do.

We're just one big family who can't agree on anything. Hope y'all have been having a good day
 
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Sorry, Brad for the veer-off. I'll respond to your above post as follows:

if a sequence of events do not seem to chronologically match, you are right, we have a problem.

Young Collins, like 99.9% of Day workers would set his personal time piece back the full amount. This was done for one simple reason, and that was to make sure that he did not go to work too early or too late the next morning i.e. by making sure that he was called at the proper time...1 Bell... 15 minutes before he was due on duty in the kitchens,
If the clock was partially set back 24 minute at midnight April 14, and say the impact took place at that moment. then an untouched clock would read Midnight, a fully set back one would read 11-13 am and the one that had been set back at that moment would read 11-36 pm. Applying this to Collins time we get

Time of Impact = Collins 11-15 pm April 15 time + 24
Time of Impact = Partial change time 11-39pm + 23
Time of Impact = Unchanged time 12-02 am April 14 time. (Time on the watch of Colonel Gracie)

Not only that, but the run time from Noon would be exactly 12 hours 02 minutes and, because the patent log read 260 nautical miles at impact, the average speed would be 21.6 knots. That average speed alone would back up the evidence of the three Navigators Pitman, Boxhall and Lowe Pitman gave a speed of 21.5 knots up to 7-30 pm sights.
Boxhall used an estimated average speed of 22 knots from 7-30 pm because of the minimum propeller slip due to flat calm conditions *he must have made an extra allowance to a lower speed found by calculation of the 7-30 pm sights)
5th Officer Lowe very specifically stated the ship averaged 20.95 knots from Noon until 6 pm.

As for the Lookouts: it is inconceivable that one Watchkeeper would make such a mistake... that two of them would do so is beyond belief.

Similarly, AB Osman was like the others on a 4 hour on-4 hour off rota. There is no way he would have made such a mistake. Additionally his Watch mate, Said exactly the same thing

Here is another one for you Brad. This time, Steward Alfred Crawford:
"I was on watch until 12 o'clock, and I was waiting for my relief to come up. I was to be relieved at 12 o'clock. I heard the crash, and I went out on the outer deck and saw the iceberg floating alongside."

Here's another bit of evidence for you to ponder, Brad. This from Lookout Fleet again.

"2488a. Did you get any orders to go on the boat deck?
- No, but I heard the boatswain call the other watch.
2492. Not only those that were on deck and on duty, but those below off duty?
- Yes, the watch that had just gone below.

2493. That would be at 12 o'clock; they had just gone below?
- Yes.


Incidentally, in your quote, Fleet stated "The watch was nearly over. I had done the best part of the watch up in the nest." If there had been no clock change and the time was 11-40 pm then Fleet would still have 20 + 24 = 44 minutes to serve up in the nest. But he only served another 20 minutes up there before he was relieved.

Cheers!
Here's another one, Brad, This from the sworn affidavit of passeneger Emily Ryerson:
At the time of collision I was awake and heard the engines stop, but felt no jar. My husband was asleep, so I rang and asked the steward, Bishop, what was the matter. He said, "There is talk of an iceberg, ma'am, and they have stopped, not to run into it." I told him to keep me informed if there were any orders. It was bitterly cold, so I put on a warm wrapper and looked out the window (we were in the large cabins on the B deck, very far aft) and saw the stars shining and a calm sea, but heard no noise. It was 12 o'clock;)
 
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