A hypothetical return journey back to 1912


Sally Butler

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Mar 28, 2003
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Go back to a specific period in Titanic’s history and document your observations.
You can take 10 people with you. Who do you take back with you to assist with your investigation? You can take 10 books, you have 48 hours.
You position your group members at specific locations. Where would you locate them based on what conclusions and observations you want to investigate?
Is it the collision? Was it what happened on the bridge?
Ten people, ten books and forty-eight hours. Your time, your location.
Place your nominated people around your selected location like setting a chess board.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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It has to be the 48 hour period which ends at around 2.45am on the night of the sinking, but many of my team won't have much to observe until the last few hours. I'm assuming that the observers must remain in a fixed location, so I can't have anybody shadowing people like Murdoch or the Sage family or the Allisons. In which case the ten other observers plus myself would be placed as follows:

1 ...... Sam Halpern on the Bridge of the Titanic.
2 ...... Dave Gittins on the Bridge of the Californian.
3 ... .. Inger Shiel seated in Lowe's boat 14 (disguised as a seaman so she won't be transferred out later, and with a good supply of cocktails to pass the time till the boat is uncovered.)
4-7 ... Four (tall) researchers with good passenger recognition skills on the boat deck, one alongside each of the four groups of lifeboats and with hopefully some leeway to move from one to another. If not, I'd make sure these observers were closest to the last boats to leave in each group.
8 ...... A good generalist stationed in boat 4. A sailor would be ideal, so Mike Standart gets that job (with a good supply of cigars to pass the time till the boat is uncovered.)
9 ...... In line with my own interest in 3rd Class, I'd base myself in the General Room near the exit to the main stairs.
10 ..... A big bloke who can stand his ground and see above the heads of a crowd (Paul Rogers will do) in the E deck working alleyway with a view aft to Q Section (3rd Class) and forward to the emergency doors into 2nd Class.
11 ..... Monica Hall in the 3rd Class open space on D Deck, making general observations about 3rd Class life on board (and with special instructions to discover the onboard price of Woodbines.)

I'll pass on the books as I'd expect my observers to be well-versed already, but those who have the time to do a bit of revision while awaiting the unfolding of events would probably be best occupied reading the Inquiry transcripts. And a set of passenger & crew recognition photos would be helpful for all.
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Bob Godfrey

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It's money, money, money all the time with you, Mon. Ernie gave me the egg count with no expectations of financial reward. Tell you what - give me the answer and there's a packet of Woodbines in it for you. Can't say fairer than that. And a packet of ten if you can confirm that Bass Stout was on offer.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Ernie's egg count was absolutely ridiculous, and has left poor Sam completely floored, and without even an equation to prove his doubts. Mind you, it was quite a boost to the imagination, I have to admit.

I know when I've got a watertight bargaining tool - so dream on about the onboard price of Woodbines, unless you can come up with something considerably more alluring than a mouldy old packet of 10.
 
May 27, 2007
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Monica >>Ernie's egg count was absolutely ridiculous.

Hi Monica,

Not if the Easter Bunny was on board traveling incognito it wasn't. It was April after all. Mr. Bunny was busy indeed.
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Bob Godfrey

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You drive a hard bargain, Mon. Ok, final offer. Packet of 10 and a pie & mash dinner. Or jellied eels, your choice. But you're not getting both, I'm not made of money.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Blast, George! On such facts do the best theories founder. I'd quite forgotten about the Easter Bunny. Just a minute ... what's with the Mr. Bunny business? How about Ms. Bunny?
 
May 27, 2007
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True, true.

Perhaps Mrs. Bunny was with him and when the call came though for ladies first he turned and said to her, "You go and I'll stay while." So now Mrs. Bunny does all the Easter egg trafficking.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>A good generalist stationed in boat 4. A sailor would be ideal, so Mike Standart gets that job (with a good supply of cigars to pass the time till the boat is uncovered.)<<

Make them real Cuban Cohibas and you've got a deal!
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My own picks would be pretty much in line with Bob's only I would also have a good engineer down in the mains to keep tabs on what was really going on down there. Roy Mengot seems to know the ground best. I think I'd have David Brown on Titanic's bridge since this single place was right at the very core of everything that went wrong.

Books...fergedaboudit! Deck plans, yes, books, no.

A lot of what's been written is sufficiently suspect that if we could trust them that far, nobody would be making this trip to begin with. I'd want to go with a clean slate and no preconceived notions to report what actually was observed to happen.

The four observers on the boat deck...I don't suppose we could con persuade Don Lynch to sign on with us, could we?
 
May 27, 2007
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I myself would like to go back in time and observe the Crew and Passengers of Titanic. Just to study them and the world in which they lived.
 

Inger Sheil

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quote:

3 ... .. Inger Shiel seated in Lowe's boat 14 (disguised as a seaman so she won't be transferred out later, and with a good supply of cocktails to pass the time till the boat is uncovered.)
Bob, you know the way to a girl's heart. I assume I'd also have to be concealing the cocktails in one of those clever devices they used during prohibition, as I suspect Lowe would be the last person to tolerate a swigging seaman in his boat! (a swearing seaman, on the other hand, would be fine).

I wouldn't volunteer anyone for the job as it would be more than flesh and blood could bear, but I'd like to have a dispassionate, omniscient account of what took place when A and B floated free.

Observers on the boat deck would be excellent - with synchronised watches and those little clickers used to count pedestrian and motor traffic. Someone on the bridge. I'll leave below decks for those more versed in the subject than me to fight it out on which baulkhead to watch, which compartment, and exactly where the best machinery viewpoints would be.​
 
May 27, 2007
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Inger >>> I'll leave below decks for those more versed in the subject than me to fight it out on which baulkhead to watch, which compartment, and exactly where the best machinery viewpoints would be <<<

Which wouldn't be me. I'll just trail after the servant recording their every move and if they notice me, I'll have a bit of fun and say I was hired by Pinkerton's "we never sleep" Detective Agency. Give'em a frill before they get a greater frill when the ship strikes the iceberg and starts to sink. That when we'll all get a thrill.
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Dec 2, 2000
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>>I'll leave below decks for those more versed in the subject than me to fight it out on which baulkhead to watch, which compartment, and exactly where the best machinery viewpoints would be.<<

I think I'd go for small hidden cameras to record everything from a very safe distance. Especially Boiler Room Five which suddenly became a health hazard when something gave up the ghost.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Do you have what it takes to be in the presense of 1500 about-to-die people whom you are helpless to save? This isn't a movie- you are shortly going to be watching the REAL people who are happily going about their business not realising that in a few hours they will (for the most part) be dead. Can you strike up a casual friendship with someone you KNOW in advance is going to die, and not have it cause long-term depression issues when the inevitable is played out? And, can you successfully resist the temptation to 'break the pattern?' even slightly. Remember- even saving...oh...say... the Goodwin infant, could cancel out life as we know it in the present!

I don't "have it" in any of those examples, and so as a Titanic time traveler would content myself with the launch and fitting out.
 
May 27, 2007
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Good Question Jim.

I'd probably end up beaming out an hour before the ship sunk.

Unless!!!

Quantum time travel like in Michael Crichton's Timeline say were I went to a dimension that mirrored our own exactly. Say I travel to a Dimension behind ours but exactly mirrors ours were the Titanic was about to sink. Yeah I could probably stomach it but if I got compassionate about a certain person and saved them it wouldn't effect our dimension but theirs would be in a world of hurt or would it. Suppose I was ordained to travel to that dimension and save that person. Then if I didn't travel to that dimension I cause a paradox in that dimension. Hmm makes you think. Because if I was destined to save that person in that dimension and they died in this dimension then that dimension wouldn't mirror our dimension any more would it. The possibilities are endless when you quantum travel in time.
 

Steven Hall

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Dec 17, 2008
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George, my daughter is studying astrophysics’.
She could assure you that whatever’s done in this dimension (or another) — will eventually impact on the one either side of our own.
Time is like a stream, in which we move along. Step out that stream, and walk back along the bank or stand still and wait for tide and current to pass and step back in.
But if you went back and changed something, how do you know it did just happen that way anyway.
If we consider time travel, than Titanic is their past. If for the sake of complete record of historical events, than people from the future WERE on board Titanic observing and noting history. Would they have been actually on board the ship (?) — Perhaps!. But maybe sitting of the ship and watching. Maybe the mystery ship was not a period ship!
If there are levels of dimensions, who says we are top of the heap. There may be many either in front, or behind.
If there was a traveler on board, he would have been on or about the bridge observing. Though rather discreetly. Was any man seen smoking a cigar…….. ???
Was there a man hanging around the radio room that looked like Parks?
Or a chap that looked like Beveridge running around with a set of plans?
Interesting question - who would you take with you.
 
May 27, 2007
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I guess who ever really wanted to go really. I'd hope to probably take-

1.Jim Kalafus? He won't stay to watch the sinking and I can't really blame him though. He wouldn't be Jim if he stayed.
2.Michael Poirier-he'd probably leave with Jim.
3.Jason Schleisman-I don't know he might stay or leave.
4.&5.You and your daughter since she studying astrophysics and as a father myself I'm sure you wouldn't want her to go alone, plus I know you have knowledge of the Titanic. We gotta be sure to get back before 12:30 ship board time though before everything hits the fan. Though I'd probably stay and knowing my luck either die or end up having shell shock from all that happened. I'd just die of curiosity and would have to see everything, no matter how painful. It would kill me to watch and I'd probably have horrific nightmares for sure. I wouldn't try to change history in that I don't want a paradox. Interesting stuff here. Though might not take anyone with me if I'm jumping dimensions. God knows were I'd first end up. Have to make a test run before I asked for people to go with me. Good questions Steve. Will have to think some more. Do me a favor and ask your daughter if she could recommend any good books to read about Quantum theories.
 

Steven Hall

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George,
sitting the table behind me are two books, In Search Of Dark Matter, by K. Freeman & G. McNamara and The Goldilocks Enigma by Paul Davies. I look inside this books and it frightens me.
You may like some of her early work she did:
http://usrwww.mpx.com.au/karinahall/
http://karinahall.txc.net.au/MoonExtinctionCycle/

The latter she won an Australian science Eureka award, this countries highest science awards. She was only 17 at the time.
The following year she was third place finalist.
You may enjoy reading them.

Her current research is on light having a negative velocity (which would allow time travel because the photons would be projected dimensionally backwards). She suggests this could be a component of ‘dark matter’, the glue that divides the dimensions — whereby not visible, but holds gravity.
I have not idea what it means, but I hear her talking about it on the phone.
She must have got her brains from her mother.
 

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