A Seasonal Thread For Those In The Christmas Spirit


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Jemma Hyder

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Christmas 1911 -

Reckon between all of us we could paint a pretty good picture of what various passengers and crew were up to 90 years ago

I'll kick it off (and probably just carry on talking to myself if no one else is bothered lol)

Jack Phillips left the Adriatic and returned home to spend Christmas with his family in Surrey

Imagine it must have been a sad time in the Wilde house though for Henry and his remaining children, wouldn't it have been the first anniversary of his wife's death, and also that of his little boys?

Imagine plenty of the passengers in first class spent the christmas season brushing shoulders with each other at spangly parties along the Eastern Seaboard or elsewhere in posh hotels around the globe....................
 
Jun 18, 2007
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Jemma, I was just thinking about Jack going back home for Christmas last night! I usually do that around this time of year (it was during his last Christmas at home that he supposedly told George Stedman that he feared icebergs, if I remember the account correctly).

And I wonder how James Moody spent his last Christmas.

Even for the survivors, 1911 was, for many, perhaps the last normal Christmas they would ever have.
 
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Jemma Hyder

Guest
Kritina

It's nice to know that Jack spent his final christmas among his friends and family, and followed it by a posting back to one of his favourite ships, as for Moody I don't know, maybe he spent it at home too, or with his uncle? Inger Help! lol
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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The Oceanic had just arrived back in Southampton, and Moody would have spent Christmas at home in St James' House. While he was feeling the pressures of a winter on the Atlantic - his first with the White Star Line - he was to be promoted on the next voyage to Fifth Officer.

One previous Christmas saw him sailing as 2nd Mate on a tramp steamer, a ship he was happy on. Fortunately, she was in Hull over the Christmas period - this provided Moody with an opportunity to travel up to Grimsby and join his family on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Several of them also came down to Hull to go over the ship, and while the adults stayed in a hotel his young cousins stayed aboard with Moody overnight. They ate well and (in that great British tradition I could never quite understand) attended a pantomime.

It was a far cry from one of his earliest days as an apprentice in sail, when he spent one Christmas lying in his bunk eating sweets and reading magazines, emerging only to eat his meals.

Wilde and Murdoch were working that Christmas - one imagines they had a meal or two of good bonhomie with their brother officers aboard ship. One certainly hopes so in Wilde's case - the previous Christmas had been bleak indeed for him. It must have been the hardest Christmas of all to be away from his young family.

Harold Lowe, serving on the Belgic, arrived on Christmas Day, 1911 in Melbourne, Australia - he would spend yet another Christmas (not his first) in the warmth of an antipodean summer. It must have been an optimistic period for him - he was on the homeward leg of his second voyage with the WSL, and back in North Wales his fiance was awaiting his return.

Lightoller, taking a few months off, was no doubt at home in Netley Abbey enjoying a rather rioutous Christmas with his young family.
 
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Jemma Hyder

Guest
lol lying on his bunk eating sweets and emerging when he smelt food? lol sounds like my boyfriend, my brother, and indeed most other young men I am aquainted with!
 

Tracy Smith

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Apr 20, 2012
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Stanley Lord was at sea on board the Californian, away from his wife, Mabel, and their three year old son, Stanley. He'd spent the previous Christmas at home, and would spend the next at home, shortly before signing on with Lawther, Latta.
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Where was Captain Smith that Christmas? I would imagine (indeed hope) that he was spending it with his family, his wife, his daughter, and his dog. And were not the Astors on honeymoon travelling about the World?

The "Damon and Pythias" of the Titanic, Major Archibald W. deG. Butt and Mr. Francis D. Millet were both pretty busy. Maj. Butt was having Christmas dinner at the White House with President Taft, who was hoping campaigning for re-election against Theodore Roosevelt, a good friend of Butt's, and so the political animosity of the two men distressed him greatly. So greatly in fact that in early 1912 he and his friend Francis Millet set off for Europe, planning to return on Titanic. Millet spent his Christmas in Rome on a six week inspection of the School of Fine Arts.

William T. Stead spent his Christmas with his friends and his family. He'd recently announced that he was planning to retire, and that he'd finished his last crusade. Little did he know he'd be invited back (by Taft himself) for one more peace conference early the next year in New York. It is said that he only agreed to go (in April 1912) so as he could have the company of Evangeline Booth of the Salvation Army for the return voyage.
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Can anyone recall the date (roughly) that Lord's widow, Mabel, died? I know it's on the headstone but I'm too idle to get in the car and drive over there! The reason is, I'm sure that I met her years ago, we had the same firm of lawyers, and I'm almost certain that I was introduced to her there.

Geoff
 

Tracy Smith

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Apr 20, 2012
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Mabel Tutton Lord died on July 27, 1957, not long after her 80th birthday. Mrs Lord had been sick for an extended period before her death, but Captain Lord and their son had cared for her at home until she passed away.

Geoff, please email me privately if you can remember any of the details of your meeting with Mrs Lord. I'd be most interested in hearing them.

[email protected]

or

[email protected]
 
May 8, 2001
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Geoff, I would love to know the details too, please tell us here if you remember. Doesn't that anger you when, years later you realize that happened? I realized that I met a survivors relative years and years ago on some business, and didn't even know it. Now his business is gone and he has moved away.
mad.gif
Colleen
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Hello! Then I'm completely wrong! In 1957 I was only 7 years old so it couldn't have been her. This was when I was buying my house in 1970, I wonder then if it was one of the Ismay family?
I recall my solicitor introducing me to a lady who he said was connected to one of the shipping lines involving the Titanic - just wish I had paid more attention!

Geoff
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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HAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!! Seven years old in 1957??? That's the funniest thing I've heard in ages!

Geoff, you've succeeded in making my Christmas merry! :)
 
May 8, 2001
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George. That was just a typo. I am sure he will go back and edit it, adding the zero after. OOWW today isn't Geoffs night is it?.....hmmmmm. Tomorrow doesn't look too promising either!!!!!
OK to even it out, Geoff, why don't you hobble on over to George's house after Christmas. I am sure he will have PLENTY of coal to burn!

Have a Merry Christmas guys! Colleen
 
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Robert W. Collier

Guest
Geoff,
With the way you are getting beat up, I am beginning to believe you are married to the whole board. Hang in there. Wait, scratch that. That might give them ideas.
Respectfully,
Robert W. Collier
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Listen you lot, compared to Behe and Cook I'm a mere Spring Chicken! Yes George, I am correct about my age (well, almost!)

Geoff
 
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Robert W. Collier

Guest
Geoff,
Are you sure it isn't "listen you louts"?
smile.gif

Merry Christmas Geoff (and Alma)
Respectfully,
Robert W. Collier
 

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