A time of reflection


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Lisa

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Jan 9, 1998
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As you all know, the 88th anniversary of the sinking is this friday, the 14th (technically it's the 15th.). I think we should all watch the movie & documentaries, then compare that info with what we know as fact. It's also a time to remember the lives that were lost in this terrible tragedy.
 

Joannie

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Mar 7, 2000
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Today, it's the 88 birthday: 88 years ago, the
Titanic left Southampton and in evening left
Cherbourg. It's amazing!
 
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Mark Bray

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I agree. It is amazing. I want to do something special to remember all those lost at maybe like 2:00 am in the morning of April 15.....any ideas?

Mark
 

Lisa Wagner

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Apr 11, 2000
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I get together with friends in a titanic chat on the computer on the 14th/15th every year. The only problem we have is that we can not decide what time we will say central standard time that the Titanic went down. Does anybody know??? Can anybody help?? What is the time difference from the North Atlantic to CST???? Thanks for any help! I say that CST would be at 11:20pm. If anybody knows please e-mail me asap.
 
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Terry Dwyer

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Lisa,
In response to your question,"Titanic Time" was 4 hours and 10 minutes ahead of CST. (According to the American Investigation)Thus the collison with the iceberg occurred at 7:30 PM CST (8:30 PM CDT).
The approximate time of the foundering occurs at
10:10 PM CST (11:10 PM CDT)
One creepy note...If you start the Cameron TITANIC
film at exactly 8:30 PM; "Film Time" catches up to the "actual time", just as actor Victor Garber
as Andrews adjusts the mantle clock in the smoking room. (~10:55 CDT...or 02:05 AM ship's time) Weird!!!
 

Sarah

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Jan 22, 1998
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Mark,
Here's an idea- get up at 2:00am and watch the movie. I kinda what to do that, but i have a track meet that i have to be awake for. But I think its a pretty good idea to do.
 
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venus33

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Hi everyone!

Guess what! I live here in Halifax Nova Scotia and Friday night/Saturday morning April 14th/15th Atlantic Standard Time, I will be at the Titanic grave yard having a candle light tribute (weather permitting). If anyone here would like me to say something from you to all of them, just send me an email with your message and we will read it out loud and say your name and where you are in the world.

I feel very comfortable in that grave yard. The energy is peaceful because the Spirits know that many of us have not, and will not forget them...

Venus
 

Lisa Wagner

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Apr 11, 2000
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Thank you Terry for your answer. I have gotten 3 different answers now and have to figure out which one is right or which one i will go by.
Thanks again
Lisa
 
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Kerry Price

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I'm curious what the decision point was for burial at sea or land burial for the victims of the Titanic. Any documentation on this?

Kerry
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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G'day, Kerry!

Here's Captain Lardner of Mackay-Bennett as reported in 1912.

"Let me say first of all," he announced when the reporters gathered around him, "that I was commissioned to bring aboard all the bodies found floating, but owing to the unanticipated number of bodies found, owing to the bad weather and other conditions it was impossible to carry out instructions, so some were committed to the deep after service, conducted by Canon Hind."

Capt. Lardner explained that neither he nor any of his people had dreamed that so many of the Titanic's dead would be found floating on the surface of the Atlantic.

ONLY 106 BODIES PRESERVED.
It was more than his embalmer could handle, for, although the material for embalming seventy bodies, which was all that Halifax sent out with the Mackay-Bennett, was supplemented at sea by materials borrowed from the Minia, the number of dead so preserved for the return to shore was only 106.

He did not know how long he would have to stay at his grim work on the scene of the wreck. He did not know how long bad weather would impede the homeward voyage.
He did not know how long he could safely carry the multitude of dead. It seemed best to recommit some to the sea, and so on three different days 116 were weighted down and dropped over the edge of the ship into the Atlantic.

Then rose the question as to why some were picked for burial at sea and others left on board to be brought home to the waiting families on shore. The reporters put the question to the Captain, and he answered it:
"No prominent man was recommitted to the deep. It seemed best to embalm as quickly as possible in those cases where large property might be involved. It seemed best to be sure to bring back to land the dead where the death might give rise to such questions as large insurance and inheritance and all the litigation.

"Most of those who were buried out there were members of the Titanic's crew. The man who lives by the sea ought to be satisfied to be buried at sea. I think it is the best place. For my own part I should be contented to be committed to the deep."

Captain Lardner also added that he decided that is was best to bury the most mutilated bodies at sea. Many were badly injured on the ship or in the water, or by sea life during the several days before he fished them out.
 
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