About Cabin numbers


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George

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Apr 27, 1998
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Mrs.Carter's maid may have been in B92 because it is a servant's room and it is near the Carter's stateroom.
Joseph Loring's cabin may be either B97, B95, or B93 because in Titanic
An Illustrated History, Loring and George Rheims are in the Smoking Room
on A deck, and it says that Loring's cabin is right beneath where they stood.
The starboard cabins beneath the smoking room are occupied by the Carters and Mr.
Harrison.
 

George

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Apr 27, 1998
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I forgot another one. Philip Mock may have been in the same cabin(C28) as his
sister Emma Shabert. I have nothing to back this up, but it's just a thought.
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Mr. Mock and his sister did not share a cabin. Mrs. Schabert claims that her brother came to her room shortly after the collision.

Also, Daniel, you are correct in stating that Mrs. Carter's maid shared a room with Mrs. Douglas' maid. They were on C-deck but I don't know where.

Michael Findlay
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
Hi!

Mrs Carter's maid was not in B92. Mr Etches was the steward in that area, and had she been in B92, Mr Etches would have certainly said so.

From the American investigation we know that Mrs Carter's maid shared a cabin with Mrs Douglas' maid, probably on C deck.

I can not stress enouph that Mr Mock was not in C28 with his sister.

Daniel.
 
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George C.

Guest
Yes, I forgot about the sharing of rooms between Mrs. Carter's maid and Mrs. Douglas's maid.
If it was on C deck, I think it would be C138. It is across from the Douglas' in C86.
 
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James Edward Owens (Jowens)

Guest
i have a questioon,on titanic plans there are cabins umbered E121 and just 121 on e deck,are these cabins ?if so are they just called cabin 121?
 
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Daniel Rosenshine (Danielr)

Guest
Hi!

The cabins are all identified by their numbers. Many first class passengers when relating their cabin number, first mentioned the number, then the deck of where their cabin was.

The cabins are usually identified by numbers, but since from deck to deck numbers repeated they were identified with the letter of the deck, ie. A36.

In third class the numbers did not repeat, except for forward E and F deck cabins and the aft G deck cabins that could be used as second class, but were generally third class. Otherwise the cabins were generally identyfied only by their numbers, or if any letter was ever included with it, it was the section letter ie. O135. Section "O" was aft on D deck.

Now, so that we would know what deck a certain third class cabin was, since not many know which section was on which deck, we mention the cabin number with it's deck location, ie D135 instead of O135.

Either way, they're the same thing.

Hope this is not too confusing, and helps.

Daniel.
 

Pamela

Member
Feb 15, 2000
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I would like to know the cabim
number that Master Marshall Brines
Drew and his Aunt Lulu and Uncle
Jimmy shared. Master Marshall was
seven years old at the time of the
sailing. I know that only he and
his Aunt survived. I believe he was
in boat #10.
 
H

Haik

Guest
I would like to know cabin #804 Passanger list. According my grandfather he, frenchmen and 2 English Gents were there. He was using different name becouse he was running from Turks.
 
C

Cassie Sholer

Guest
Hi,
I'm just here for a second. I'm doing a project and I was just wondering how many rooms were acctully on the Titanic?.
 
M

Morgan Henn

Guest
Hello,
I need your HELP!! I have to find out what Miss Ellen Mary Toomey's room # and Ticket # were by Friday! Thanks! E-Mail me if you know!!!
Morgan
 
T

tigerqt6

Guest
I would like to know what cabin # Mrs Charlotte Collyer was in. She was a second class passenger.
 

Pat Cook

Member
Apr 26, 2000
1,277
6
313
For what it's worth, I checked through my copy of Charlotte Collyer's "How I Was Saved From The Titanic" and all she says regarding her cabin was that it was situated 'well forward' and she could see the great send off, which intimates it being on the port side, if this is any help.

Best regards,
Pat Cook
 
M

Muffet Brown

Guest
Would it be a safe guess that all sizeable, outside staterooms on B-deck got the fancy, period decors, (as opposed to the relatively spartan white paneling of Fr. Browne's room & the basic 1st class staterooms shown on the White Star brochure)? Or would these embellishments be reserved for suites only?

I'm trying to figure out the decor of Molly Brown's likely staterooms B1, 2, 4 etc. From her accounts we know it had a window looking out on a deck someone could stand on, and that the window was quite near or over her bed, and that she had a brass bedframe. Someone suggested to me that the room which explorers think was hers was done in the Empire? style (wood bed). In his book about wreck Pellegrino says that this room still has bed bolted to floor, so I'm guessing it was a bedframe like the enamel & brass one found in debris field. Anybody know?
Further I wonder how would ladies like Molly manage for 7 days with just one wardrobe cabinet, maybe space for one standing trunk, and space for the empty trunk under her bed? It seems just hats alone would take up half the room!
 

Andrew Maheux

Member
Dec 4, 2000
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Dorothy Gibson stated that her cabin was on E-deck, near an elevator and not to far from a staircase. Does anyone know specifically (I dont think I spelled that right)what cabin she was in and was she sharring with her mother Pauline?

any info will be great.

Regards,

Andrew
 
Jul 20, 2000
1,479
5
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Hi Andrew,

It is suggested in the Cabin Allocations that Miss Gibson and her mother were in E-22. But the suggestion is with a ?

The Baxters and Mrs Douglas had Suites B-58 and B-60. The Steward Cave list gives both numbers for the Baxters and B-60 for Mrs Douglas.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Lester
 
Jul 20, 2000
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Hi Muffet,

Interesting comments about the room occupied by Margaret Brown. Given that he was able to tell us about the bed wonder why Pellegrino did not advise which room number it was?

Actually I have always throught that Margaret was on A-deck because James McGough is said to have been outside her window at the time of the collision (?). The forward open end of B-deck seems to me to be a funny place for someone who had a room on E-deck to have been going for a walk. But on A-deck most reasonable.

Regards,
Lester
 
D

Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
Hello Lester,

What is your source that McGough was outside her window? It is possible as she says one of the Gimbles & Bros buyers was outside her window, but I'd just like to know where you read or what/who claimed it was McGough.

I think Mrs. Brown herself stated that she was on B deck (and not A deck) thus we can rule out A deck.

I could try and answer Muffet's question but I don't think she visits this board anymore. I have somewhat answered her question on the "Styles of Staterooms" discussion.

Daniel.
 
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