About Cabin numbers

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Hi Andrew,

It is suggested in the Cabin Allocations that Miss Gibson and her mother were in E-22. But the suggestion is with a ?

The Baxters and Mrs Douglas had Suites B-58 and B-60. The Steward Cave list gives both numbers for the Baxters and B-60 for Mrs Douglas.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Lester
 
Hi Muffet,

Interesting comments about the room occupied by Margaret Brown. Given that he was able to tell us about the bed wonder why Pellegrino did not advise which room number it was?

Actually I have always throught that Margaret was on A-deck because James McGough is said to have been outside her window at the time of the collision (?). The forward open end of B-deck seems to me to be a funny place for someone who had a room on E-deck to have been going for a walk. But on A-deck most reasonable.

Regards,
Lester
 

Daniel Rosenshine

Former Member
Hello Lester,

What is your source that McGough was outside her window? It is possible as she says one of the Gimbles & Bros buyers was outside her window, but I'd just like to know where you read or what/who claimed it was McGough.

I think Mrs. Brown herself stated that she was on B deck (and not A deck) thus we can rule out A deck.

I could try and answer Muffet's question but I don't think she visits this board anymore. I have somewhat answered her question on the "Styles of Staterooms" discussion.

Daniel.
 
I'm not sure whether or not is has been firmly established that the Dickinson Bishops were in B-49. They may well have occupied B-47.
Have a look at the ET cabin allocations..see what they suggest.
It may have been unoccupied. Or else it was occupied by someone who paid a fairly high price for their cabin but the location is unknown such as the Meyers.
Hope this helps
Ben
 
Thanks for your help! Mrs Dickinson-Bishop apparently stated B-47 in the enquiry, but it is thought that there was an error of some kind. I am interested because I am taking part in a virtual Titanic voyage in April, and am 'occupying' B-47, I wondered who really did have the cabin.
Laura
 
Hi Ben,

What makes you think B-47 would have been an expensive room? As with the other 3-berth Inside rooms on B-deck the advertized rate was the same as the 2-berth Inside rooms on C-deck - 33 pounds each for 2 passengers. Both the Meyers and the Bishops paid more than that. - B-49 was 45 pounds each for 2 passengers.

But price alone does not tell us which rooms people were in. The Thayers and the Wideners had the same type of accommodations, but the Wideners paid about 100 pounds more.

Hope this helps,
Lester
 
Hi Lester,
Oops, I must have misread the ist class passengers "high detail" list..read too high or something!
I think the difference with the Wideners and the Thayers is that three Wideners had bathroom facilities. C-80 and C-82 were on either side of a bathroom. John B and Marion Thayer had a bathroom but not Jack. His stateroom, C-70 was in the middle of three i.e there was a stateroom either side. It was the same with the Minahans.
They did not have private bathroom facilities like the Wideners nextdoor.
I was just working on the lifeboats when Christmas intervened!
Will have the figures soon

Regards
Ben
 
Hi Ben,

If you work out how to book let me know. I could not get in either.

I'm confused with what you say about the Wideners and the Thayers and bathrooms. There was a bathroom and wardrobe complex between C-80 and C-82 for the Wideners and the same between C-68 and C-70 for the Thayers. As you say the Minahans in C-78 had a middle room; but C-70 was not a middle room. C-72 was.

Hope this helps. Looking forward to your further lifeboat comments.

With all good wishes for the New Year, Century, Millennium,
Lester
 
Hi Lester,
Looking at the deckplans, you're right about C-70. It had adjoining bathroom/wardrobe facilities. Perhaps the interior of the widener cabins were more ornate. Do you have "An illustrated history". You will see from the detailed de-luxe suite plan that the interiors differ.
I agree with you about trying to establish a passenger's cabin from the price. W.T. Stead paid only £26 11s for his large cabin on C-deck and Thornton Davidson paid £52 for his de luxe stateroom on B-deck (unless Hays contributed to the cost).
Having said that I am fairly confident in placing Dr. Arthur J. Brewe in A-17. Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon paid the exact same price (£39 11s..I think) for the equivelent cabin on the port side, A-16. As far as I know nobody else paid that price.
 

Daniel Rosenshine

Former Member
Personally I would think that placing passenger in cabins according to their ticket price is a VERY dangerous game. For example, Brandeis. With that price he could easily end up in a B deck suite. However he was given a stingy B10. Unless the '10' was a misprint of '70', Brandeis is a good example of why not to place passengers in cabins according to their price.

As for the Widener cabins, I think they were two of the 14 decorated (i.e. period) suites on C deck. C70 was also certainly one of them, decorated in Modern Dutch, with a brass bed.

W. T. Stead did not pay £26 11s for C87. He originally was in a smaller cabin (possibly on C deck, a cabin similar to C99 and possibly between the 2nd and 3rd funnel casing). Such a cabin would have cost him £26 11s, and he later moved to C87. I don’t know if he had to pay the extra cost, or if his popularity would have issued it to him free of charge.

As for the Davidsons and Hays'. They would have had to pay a very large sum, but I think they were some friends of the White Star Line, something connected with railways (I'm not too familiar with the story, Alan Hustak would know more), thus they were only required to pay the minimum fee and were given suites.

There were all sorts of exceptions, meals, luggage .... friends, discounts.

Daniel.
 

Daniel Rosenshine

Former Member
Sorry, I just checked the plans. I'm not 100% sure which C deck cabins were actually suites that were decorated in various styles.

I can say for sure that C55-57-62-63-64-65-67-70-72-74 are. Also, I was mistaken, C80 was not decorated in period style, it was the same style as C68 and a whole score of other cabins. If any aft cabins were decorated, I think C82 and 84 were and thus 75 and 77, but I'm not sure about 79, 81, 83, 86, 88, 90. On the Olympic the corresponding cabins (although they had different numbers) were decorated in period styles, but they had 2, 3-foot wide berths arranged as in cabin C70 and they had sofas. The above aft C deck cabins mentioned do not have sofas.

Also if C83 was decorated in a style, then the Harrises seem to pay a rather low price for it, however the people on the other side such as the Douglas', Frauenthals and Berthe Mayne seem to have paid adequate prices for a period decorated suite.

Daniel.
 
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