Accident Investigation in the Wreck of Zingara


Kas01

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Not sure if this is the best subforum to put this in, but during their engagement, Colonel Astor and Madeleine were involved in the rescue of three or four crewmen from a disabled sloop named the Zingara. Was a formal report ever made by the relevant authorities (i.e. police or the Revenue Cutter Service), and if so does it survive?
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Not sure if this is the best subforum to put this in, but during their engagement, Colonel Astor and Madeleine were involved in the rescue of three or four crewmen from a disabled sloop named the Zingara. Was a formal report ever made by the relevant authorities (i.e. police or the Revenue Cutter Service), and if so does it survive?
Not sure about a police report but it was covered in the press...
"Colonel John Jacob Astor and his fiancee, Miss Madeleine Force, stepped nearer the spotlight today when the wireless on their yacht, the Noma, told of the rescue of five men from the wrecked sloop Zingara. The Noma is now on her way to New London or Newport with the rescued men aboard. The Noma became a center of attention yesterday when Colonel Astor, with Miss Force and her father, went aboard and started up Long Island Sound for a wedding at sea. ... Colonel Astor and the Forces said that this was merely a week-end cruise undertaken primarily for the benefit of Miss Force, who has been in poor health for the past few days. ... The men rescued from the Zingara were Captain Lester Bauer, James S. Mann, Willlam Humphreys, Herbert Hendricksen and James McDonough. All of them live in New York. [Note: The New York Sun reported Bauer to have been the owner.]" (Source: Anon. "Miss Force Sees Astor In Thrilling Rescue Of Sinking Ship's Crew. Yacht Noma Arrives Just In Time To Save Five Men Of The Sloop Zingara From Drowning. Meet A Real Adventure. Millionaire's Fiancee And Her Father Look On While He Helps Launch The Lifeboat." Brooklyn Daily Eagle, August 19, 1911, p. 1.)

"... The Zingara is owned by Frederick D. and Frank H. Newton, who are connected with a large automobile tire house. According to New York dispatches, Frederick Newton's wife and a cousin, Miss Edith Newton, were on the Zingara, but Captain Roberts of the Noma said nothing of the presence of the women in his report which was sent ashore by the Noma's wireless equipment, ..." (Source: Anon. "Astor's Captain Rescues Wrecked Sloop's Five Men.") Philadelphia Inquirer, August 20, 1911, p. 4.)

"New York, Aug. 19 [1911]. --- The rescue of the Zingara' s crew occurred shortly before midnight twelve miles off Horton's Point. It was described in the following wireless message received by the Associated Press today from the Noma:
'Captain Richard Roberts, master of Colonel J. J. Astor's steam yacht Noma, rescued the crew of five men from the the fifty-two-foot sloop Zingara at 11:30 p. m. (Friday). Strong wind from west northwest with very rough sea. She (the Zingara) left Duck Island this morning headed toward New Haven.
Pay No Attention.
She struck heavy squall off Indian Neck this afternoon which nearly capsized her, washing binnacle and everything movable overboard. The five men worked at the pumps all the afternoon, but without avail as her seams had opened badly.
Captain of the Zingara said several vessels paid no attention to their signal for help. Rescue was made twelve miles west of Horton's Point by life boat and the use of Noma's powerful searchlight." (Source: Anon. "Crew Of Astor's Yacht Rescue Five Wrecked At Sea. Sloop Zingara Strikes Hard In Heavy Squall And Pleasure Yacht Of New York Millionaire Goes To Aid. Colonel Astor And Fiancee Assist At Midnight Rescue." Buffalo Courier, August 20, 1911, p. 35.)

"New Haven, Conn., Aug. 19[1911]. --- The yacht Zingara, which was abandoned off Duck Island last night, after the crew had been taken off by Colonel Astor's yacht, drifted into the East River, in Madison, during the morning. Before it drifted on the rocks. W. P. Leete, of that place put off in a launch and anchored the Zingara in a sheltered place. The sails were furled, but one of the boats had been cut free from the davits. The yacht's condition was fair." (Source: Anon. "Yacht Zingara Found.") Philadelphia Inquirer, August 20, 1911, p. 4.)
 

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