Activities for Children

Aug 15, 2005
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our feral children were immersing the free end of the toilet roll in the WC bowl then keeping the running flush button pressed to see the roll unravel at speed and disappear round the bend

So it's not just my niece and nephew!
I was worried about the sanity of their little minds for a while...
 

Ernie Luck

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Nov 24, 2004
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I think it's the parents sanity you need to worry about. My twin grandchildren flushed their father mobile phone down the toilet!!
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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So you have a running flush in your house then Ryan? One usually needs an engine room for that!

Reverting to topic:

Unoccupied staterooms are normally prudently kept locked against unauthorised nefarious use such as illicit assignations and smuggling.

Where passage conditions allow and the need arises, the opportunity is taken to re-decorate unoccupied staterooms. The painting is done by the otherwise-redundant stewards or sometimes deck staff on overtime. Most experienced assistant stewards are dab hands with a paint brush.

Noel
 
Mar 16, 2006
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What a delightful conversation...I can imagine children doing all of the above...and probably things that would make this grammy shudder. A couple years ago we took the grandsons on a Disney Cruise where EVERYTHING is geared to make their passage delightful....though I, personally, would have loved the thought of dropping my teddy over the banister....
 
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Adam Lang

Guest
I would have somehow found a way to sneak into the engine rooms and explore the ship below decks. What could be more fun than watching the boilers while trying not to get caught by the engineers?

-Adam Lang
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>What could be more fun than watching the boilers while trying not to get caught by the engineers?<<

The consequences of facing the skipper or his representatives and one's parants after being caught.

Oops.

That wouldn't be fun.
 
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Adam Lang

Guest
"The consequences of facing the skipper or his representatives and one's parants after being caught."

That just makes the gamble even more fun! ;)
 

Ernie Luck

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Nov 24, 2004
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It's been mentioned in this thread before but in 1912 children were expected to behave with more propriety - in first and second class at least.

The prevailing attitude I believe was that children should be 'seen and not heard' and speak only when spoken to. How things have changed.
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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"What could be more fun than watching the boilers while trying not to get caught by the engineers?"

The prospect would probably have scared the **** out of you. A boiler room on full steam is a daunting prospect for the uninitiated of any age with its cacophony of eerie noises emanating from plating and pipework under pressure. Not to mention the disconcerting heat and the Dantean glow from the furnace fronts.

Noel
 
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Adam Lang

Guest
Well, as a little kid, that's right! But, all the same, it would be fun to see the things up close. That reminds me of the scene from JC's Titanic when Andrews was giving Rose and Co. a little tour of the ship, and right before Jack pulled her aside, he said, "Next stop will be the engine room!" Even if they had contacts like that, do you think they would let a respectable group of first class passengers anywhere near the engine rooms?

-Adam Lang
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Even if they had contacts like that, do you think they would let a respectable group of first class passengers anywhere near the engine rooms? <<

Doubtful. Shipping lines do not encourage passengers to go into the working spaces of a ship...especially the main propulsion plant...at least not without close and watchful supervision. The main spaces of any of any ship are especially dangerous even with the modern safety devices that exist today. The unwary can find themselves in the Hurt Locker real quick.

The boiler room scenes in the flick were especially well sanitized. These spaces on the real thing were hot beyond belief, even in the chilly North Atlantic, and with coal piled everywhere, dirty beyond description.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>what would happen to a Child who wandered on to the Bridge?<<

He would be escorted off and taken back to his parents. White Star didn't even encourage adult visitors to the navigation bridge of their ships.
 

Lucy Burkhill

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Mar 31, 2006
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>>Even if they had contacts like that, do you think they would let a respectable group of first class passengers anywhere near the engine rooms?<<

>>Doubtful. Shipping lines do not encourage passengers to go into the working spaces of a ship...especially the main propulsion plant...at least not without close and watchful supervision. The main spaces of any ship are especially dangerous even with the modern safety devices that exist today. The unwary can find themselves in the Hurt Locker real quick<<

I have often wondered about how factual the engine room tour bit was in JC's flick. The scene where Jack and Rose run through the stokehold always seemed pretty implausible to me.

However, after liners were converted to oil-burning in the early 1920's, was it the case that passengers could be shown the power plant?
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Here is an extract from Humfrey Jordan's Mauretania, p 238, originally published in 1936...

"The boiler rooms had become different places in which a different race of men worked- a handful where there had been hundreds before. Interested passengers could be taken round and shown the surroundings of furnaces as clean as the decks."

I'll admit if I was a child on the Titanic, I would be itching to get a glimpse of the those massive, awesome triple-expansion engines! The fact that it would be frightening and not a little dangerous down there would only add to the appeal. From as long as I can remember I have been fascinated by steam-driven plant in particular. This must have something to do with the fact that there is, (on my father's side), a tradition of engineering going back to the 18th century. When I was very small my father used to work in a brickworks, and I can remember him taking me into the building where he worked to show me the steam engine (it was like a miniature version of a marine engine) which powered the plant.
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Dec 2, 2000
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>>The scene where Jack and Rose run through the stokehold always seemed pretty implausible to me.<<

It was. These were not only the hottest spaces in the ship, they were also the dirtiest and the most dangerous. Yet Rose doesn't have even a smudge on her dress after running through spaces thick with fumes and coal dust coating everything in sight.

>>was it the case that passengers could be shown the power plant?<<

Could they be? Yes.

Would they be? Well, that's the question isn't it? I think it would depend a lot on the shipping line and whether or not they were willing to take the chance. Questions of liability may not have been as vexing as they are today, but they were not non-existant. Absent that, men in a working space ay not have been all that keen to have tourists underfoot. Even without a need for stokers, a steam plant was then and still is a tricky system that needs a lot of attention and a minimum of distractions in the interests of safety.
 

Lucy Burkhill

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Mar 31, 2006
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>>Was it the case that passengers could be shown the power plant?<<

>>could they be? Yes<<

>>Would they be? Well, that's the question isn't it? I think it would depend a lot on the shipping line and whether or not they were willing to take the chance<<

I would presume that any visits to the power plant were at the discretion of the Chief Engineer. As in the case of the Mauretania I have always thought that as when she was new her engines were revolutionary (oops- there's a pun in there!!!!), and she still retained the Blue Riband throughout virtually all of the 1920's, there would have been some demand by passengers to see her famous engines. Also I have often wondered what type of passengers would be keen to visit the power plant. Okay, I'm making a gender stereotype here, but I would presume male, maybe from a background in engineering????
 

Haowei Shi

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Aug 25, 2010
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The best way to play on the TITANIC is to swing on the cargo cranes;run all over the ship;tricking other people;play hide and seek in the tank top with out getting caught;riding the elevator up and down until bored;climb on the railings if you dare;have a race with your friends to the bottom and back to the boat deck.
 

Senan Molony

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Jan 30, 2004
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The adults, on the other hand, liked to play on the companionways... as well as the cargo cranes!

My, how they laughed! (Until they got tired and cranky.)

Question - what stuff on the Titanic did the kids break? Because the kids always break stuff.

Did they break the wireless that time?
 
May 27, 2007
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I see Doug and Mary are having a fine time posing for the camera. That Fairbanks was such a showman.

Kids love to get into everything. I bet the kids saw more of the RMS Titanic sneaking around then the adults ever did. At least those that managed to give their care givers/gaolers the slip.