Advice on best Titanic book?

Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
I will definitely look for the two Samuel Halpern books you mentioned, as well as the one by Paul Lee.
Unlike some other books that I can mention (but rather not), those works mentioned above (and many others) concentrate on genuine research, analysis of evidence and clear presentation; not rant and rave about how other Titanic researchers and are sensation-seekers, romantics and ignorant out to deceive the gullible ordinary aficionados like the rest of us.

With the likes of Paul Lee and Sam Halpern, the few and far between disagreements are expressed in a polite, gentlemanly manner, leaving an opening for a healthy debate, often through these forums. Since you are particularly interested in the Californian incident and have expressed a desire to acquire other works on the subject, you will see the difference between products of genuine research/analysis and a mish-mash of personal opinions and vendettas being rammed down the readers' throats.

I assure you that buying those books mentioned by me in post #58 will be money more than well spent.
 
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WarrenHarding

Member
Would someone recommend a book on the RMS Titanic that they feel is the most accurate with the least amount of error, etc? Is it available to the general public? Library?

Thanks -

WH
 
IanMcD

IanMcD

Member
Can't go wrong with A Night to Remember or Sea of Glass.
 
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Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Would someone recommend a book on the RMS Titanic that they feel is the most accurate with the least amount of error, etc? Is it available to the general public?
If you want something that discusses the ship and details about its fateful maiden voyage, including extremely well researched, as accurate as possible factual detail, nothing comes even close to On A Sea Of Glass by Tad Fitch, Kent Layton & Bill Wormstedt. The book is a tour de force of advanced research with the disaster itself presented in careful, chronological order covering as many areas as possible. It also had a very detailed appendices section with references, end notes etc which in itself is a superb research tool. Very easy to read.

This is a book for a genuine Titanic aficionado and not a casual non-fiction thriller.

Can't go wrong with A Night to Remember or Sea of Glass.
A Night to Remember is a good piece of work for its period but it is somewhat short in detail and the narrative style may not match with contemporary expectations, especially if you are after hard and detailed facts.

If you want a book about analysis of important actual events like how Boiler Room 4 flooded, the forces involved in the Titanic's break-up etc and the technicalities involved, there is nothing to compare with Sam Halpern's Report into the Loss of the SS Titanic: A Centennial Appraisal. This is another incomparable work which I always keep with me for reference. I would strongly suggest you also save Sam's site Titanicology for cross reference.

If you want a book about very detailed analysis of the so-called Californian incident and other ships involved, the best IMO is Sam Halpern's Strangers In The Horizon: Titanic & Californian - A Forensic Approach. I would also recommend Dr Paul Lee's The Titanic and The Indifferent Stranger for this subject.
Of course, there are other rather more....ah...self-opinionated books on the Californian controversy but I'll leave that for you to decide.
 
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Mike Spooner

Mike Spooner

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A good book understanding the mechanics of Titanic: RMS TITANIC Owners Workshop Manual by Richard P de Kerbrech and David Hutchings.
Followed by Richard other book: DOWN AMONGST THE BLACK GANG.
 
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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
Even I enjoy the book "Ghosts of the Titanic" by Charles Pellegrino his books are nothing I would recommend! Most of the stuff is made up. Regarding the book "Anatomy of the Titanic" by Tom McCluskie honestly I am not impressed. He did not go into detail and many pictures there are actually from Olympic or even Britannic and if I remember right some are also wrong captioned. I think both volumes of Titanic - The Ship Magnificent are the best about her construction.

The Titanic books by Eaton and Haas like Titanic - Triumph and Tragedy are also worth to read!

I'm currently checking out Ghosts of the Titanic but it's the same title by another author. :O
 
M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
Hi Sally :)
Search "Titanic" under books in the online catalog for your town's public library branch(es) and there are a LOT to choose from! I actually requested 18 from various branches to be sent to my nearest library for me to pick up. (There are a bunch more though, particularly if you include non-children's books). I'm taking the children's books route (the more scenic route); the non-fiction ones are not only informative, the historical-fiction chapter books manage to stay mostly pure of heart too, which is very important to me. :) I'm especially interested in true testimonies from real survivors, and historical fiction (reading the S.O.S. Titanic by Eve Bunting is what set me off... I wrote a little poem about that, it's on the "About Me" part of my profile). The first Titanic book I ever read was Nearer My God To Thee: Story of the Wreck of the Titanic, The Ocean's Greatest Disaster (Memorial edition, 1912, by Marshall Everett. It was hot off the presses that very same year!) I found it in a box of my grandpa's old books in my garage. It was so moving and sensational that I wrote a poem about it: Take a sentimental journey with me ...
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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Moderator
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Hello,
Hi Sally :)
Search "Titanic" under books in the online catalog for your town's public library branch(es) and there are a LOT to choose from! I actually requested 18 from various branches to be sent to my nearest library for me to pick up. (There are a bunch more though, particularly if you include non-children's books). I'm taking the children's books route (the more scenic route); the non-fiction ones are not only informative, the historical-fiction chapter books manage to stay mostly pure of heart too, which is very important to me. :) I'm especially interested in true testimonies from real survivors, and historical fiction (reading the S.O.S. Titanic by Eve Bunting is what set me off... I wrote a little poem about that, it's on the "About Me" part of my profile). The first Titanic book I ever read was Nearer My God To Thee: Story of the Wreck of the Titanic, The Ocean's Greatest Disaster (Memorial edition, 1912, by Marshall Everett. It was hot off the presses that very same year!) I found it in a box of my grandpa's old books in my garage. It was so moving and sensational that I wrote a poem about it:
Please note that Sally hasn't accessed the board, in over 8 years. Therefore, it is unlikely she will see your post.
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
A good book understanding the mechanics of Titanic: RMS TITANIC Owners Workshop Manual by Richard P de Kerbrech and David Hutchings.
Followed by Richard other book: DOWN AMONGST THE BLACK GANG.
Down Amongst the Black Gang and Titanic: The Ship Magnificent are the only 2 Titanic books left I want to get.
I'm still looking for a copy of the book RMS Aquitania The Ship Beautiful by Mark C. I just ordered his book on the "Big Four". He puts out good stuff. Other than those I'm pretty much done buying books on Titanic until something comes out that fundamentaly changes the story which I doubt will happen at this point. Cheers.
 
Kyle Naber

Kyle Naber

Member
I’m reading On A Sea of Glass right now and I can’t believe how thorough it is! It keeps me awake and interested during long shifts at work lol.
 
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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
I’m reading On A Sea of Glass right now and I can’t believe how thorough it is! It keeps me awake and interested during long shifts at work lol.
Cool. Looks like it got great reviews on Goodreads. I'm not seeing it in my city's or county's library catalog online, but maybe I can find a copy of it someday; I like hearing all the testimonies by survivors. For example, among the stacks of Titanic books I currently have checked out from the library is 10 True Tales: Titanic Young Survivors by Allan Zullo (she even acknowledges the Encyclopedia Titanica as a resource). They're so brave, these kids; so much heartfelt emotion in their memories. I'd like to read The Loss of the S.S. Titanic : its Story and its Lessons by Lawrence Beesley, a teacher who survived the Titanic (2nd class) and published a book about it that very same year. (Heard about it in a Fun Fact in a non-fiction children's book). That guy also tried to sneak in as an extra in the sinking scene of "A Night to Remember" (the 1958 film) but it says here the director removed him. ;) Sometimes I daydream about being an extra in some kind of meaningful, wholesome family film, not sure which one or how to get in though, since I'm not a model.
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
Cool. Looks like it got great reviews on Goodreads. I'm not seeing it in my city's or county's library catalog online, but maybe I can find a copy of it someday; I like hearing all the testimonies by survivors. For example, among the stacks of Titanic books I currently have checked out from the library is 10 True Tales: Titanic Young Survivors by Allan Zullo (she even acknowledges the Encyclopedia Titanica as a resource). They're so brave, these kids; so much heartfelt emotion in their memories. I'd like to read The Loss of the S.S. Titanic : its Story and its Lessons by Lawrence Beesley, a teacher who survived the Titanic (2nd class) and published a book about it that very same year. (Heard about it in a Fun Fact in a non-fiction children's book). That guy also tried to sneak in as an extra in the sinking scene of "A Night to Remember" (the 1958 film) but it says here the director removed him. ;) Sometimes I daydream about being an extra in some kind of meaningful, wholesome family film, not sure which one or how to get in though, since I'm not a model.
If you don't mind the E version you can read his book on the link below for free.. I prefer regular books as opposed to the E-versions but I know many like the new style and only read E-books now. But I'm old school...kinda stuck in the past when comes to some things. Cheers.
 
Seumas

Seumas

Member
Cool. Looks like it got great reviews on Goodreads. I'm not seeing it in my city's or county's library catalog online, but maybe I can find a copy of it someday; I like hearing all the testimonies by survivors. For example, among the stacks of Titanic books I currently have checked out from the library is 10 True Tales: Titanic Young Survivors by Allan Zullo (she even acknowledges the Encyclopedia Titanica as a resource). They're so brave, these kids; so much heartfelt emotion in their memories. I'd like to read The Loss of the S.S. Titanic : its Story and its Lessons by Lawrence Beesley, a teacher who survived the Titanic (2nd class) and published a book about it that very same year. (Heard about it in a Fun Fact in a non-fiction children's book). That guy also tried to sneak in as an extra in the sinking scene of "A Night to Remember" (the 1958 film) but it says here the director removed him. ;) Sometimes I daydream about being an extra in some kind of meaningful, wholesome family film, not sure which one or how to get in though, since I'm not a model.
There is a cheap omnibus edition published by Dover Maritime Press (there are also a lot of second hand copies available online) that contains Beesley's book, Gracie's book and the chapters from Lightoller's biography that deal exclusively with the Titanic. A good book to have and inexpensive too :)
 
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