Aft Grand Staircase

  • Thread starter David Matthew Stewart (Titanicus)
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David Matthew Stewart (Titanicus)

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I see lots of pictures of the Forward Grand Staircase, but I've only seen a few of the Aft. Grand Staircase (Between Funnel's 3 & 4), is it true that this one didn't have a cherub on the center- rail, AND that the clock on the first landing wasn't as opulent? Also, I'm not sure about where the boat broke, but wasn't it right through this part of the ship, (IE: right through the Aft. Grand Staircase's Foyer...) thanks.
 
Apr 26, 2005
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David: The aft grand staircase was also decorated with a bronze cherub, quite it was a little bit smaller than the forward staircase' cherub. The clock is one of the few differences between the two staircases. The one on the aft was higher and was not as somptuous as the one forward. The Titanic broke, as you said, just near the glass dome of the aft grand staircase. Hope I help you more with your questions. Sincerely,

Charles
 
Dec 12, 1999
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David and Charles:
As you correctly identify, the ship broke in two at the aft staircase. Walter Lord makes the point in "The Night Goes On" that this fact demonstrates the tendency of builders - - since the construction of the engineering marvel, Great Eastern, in the 1860s - - to backpedal on safety and engineering, in favor of luxury. In particular, Lord says that a bulkhead should have existed where the staircase was. Instead, there were luxurious cafes, dining areas, a fancy staircase. Lord also suggests that the Great Eastern survived a comparable accident when a shoal cut a hole in its bottom - - where Titanic obviously did not. In sum, far from being "unsinkable" - - from a shipbuilding safety vantagepoint, the Titanic was a step backward. The fact the ship broke where it did is just another one of the many, almost poetic, symbols of deeper meaning that make the Titanic story such a Greek tragedy.
 
Dec 12, 1999
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David and Charles:
As you correctly identify, the ship broke in two at the aft staircase. Walter Lord makes the point in "The Night Goes On" that this fact demonstrates the tendency of builders - - since the construction of the engineering marvel, Great Eastern, in the 1860s - - to backpedal on safety and engineering, in favor of luxury. In particular, Lord says that a bulkhead should have existed where the staircase was. Instead, there were luxurious cafes, dining areas, a fancy staircase. Lord also suggests that the Great Eastern survived a comparable accident when a shoal cut a hole in its bottom - - where Titanic obviously did not. In sum, far from being "unsinkable" - - from a shipbuilding safety vantagepoint, the Titanic was a step backward. The fact the ship broke where it did is just another one of the many, almost poetic, symbols of deeper meaning that make the Titanic story such a Greek tragedy.
 
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David Matthew Stewart (Titanicus)

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Okay, thank you, i apreciate it!
 

Bryan

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Sep 5, 2011
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Hi. I have been looking all over for good pictures of the Grand Staircase for my school's history fair, in which I am doing Titanic. I need some pictures! Preferably, ones in color (like from museum exhibits, computer art, or even the movie, only if there is no Jack/Rose stuff in it). If you could tell me where to find some, I would be so happy! Thankyou!


(Side not): The Grand Staircase is the best single piece of Gilded Age architecture, if not modern!
 

Mike Herbold

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Feb 13, 2001
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Bryan:
I've seen some on some of the other sites but can' remember exactly where. Use the Links feature and check some of the general sites.
Mike
 
O

oakers

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The cherub that has been recovered from the wreck site is the one from the Titanic's aft grand staircase. I have often seen pictures of it mis-quoted in books saying that it was from the forward one. The fact that the ship broke apart in the vicinity of the aft staircase would suggest why this cherub was found in the debrie field
 
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oakers

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Titanic split in two where there were a number of large open spaces in her hull (one being the aft grand staircase) which made it the most vulnerable place for a break. There were hatchways down to the engine room for instance that were used to install/remove machinery and a number of large public rooms such as the second class dining room.
 
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sue ann wang

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can only the 1st class passengers go on the grand staircase? or can other passengers get on it too. please reply... i need help.
 

Joshua Gulch

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Mar 31, 2001
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Sue,
Both grand stairways were only open to the first class. This was due to the segregation of classes. There were no exceptions, except in emergencies.

Although, second class passengers were allowed to tour some first class spaces before the ship got underway.

Josh.
 
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Roelof Jan Feersma Hoekstra

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Here is a new picture i found of the Aft Staircase. I haven't seen this one b4.
And i think many of you also haven't seen this one before
93208.jpg
 

Tim Brandsoy

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Feb 19, 2002
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Interesting. And there isn't a clock. Could that be where/how the rumors started that there wasn't a clock in Honor and Glory?
 

Shane Worthy

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Aug 12, 2004
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Roelof,
This is a picture of the Olympic's Aft Grand staircase, believed to be identical to Titanic's. Both ships were supposedly supposed to have this clock that you see. It is not, however, the forward Grand Staircase clock on any of the Olympic class ships. This picture though is not new and has been in circulation for some time.
All Ahead Full!
Shane N. Worthy
 
Dec 7, 2000
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All,

As Shane said, this isn't a new image and is reasonably well known. A close up and darkening of the clock shows that it was actually in place:

93241.jpg


Regards,

Daniel.
 
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Steve Olguin

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Mar 31, 2005
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while i am a fan of the architecture of the grand staircase, I think the designers should have designed the aft staircase in painted white woods and carry over the breezy feel of the Cafe'. Just my thoughts on something that never happend.
 
Feb 14, 2010
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It seems this photo was taken just after the 1913 refit. On the Titanic, the room that opened here on B Deck, a reception room, was larger, and painted in white, as we can see on a well-known engraving.
 

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