Age of Majority


Paul Rogers

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Bob, when I typed "B*gger", I actually meant to type: "BEggAr", as in: "I can't believe what a silly mistake I just made. It really does bugger belief."

My fault; apologies.
 

Paul Rogers

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Correct, Mark. That's your starter for 10. Now for your bonus question:

The movie gave rise to two new words. For 5 points each, what are the words and what do they mean?

No conferring.

Come on, come on!

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Dec 2, 2000
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>>since most if not all of those over 75 probably don't (or rarely) have sex,<<

Apparantly, this was no problem for Catherine The Great. Getting older may have slowed her down a bit, but she didn't really stop until she permanently assumed room temperature. (It's good to be the Queen!)
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Jun 12, 2004
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I would say . . .

Dirty old women? lol. Naw, that's three words. Hmmmm. Ummm, how about . . .cradle robber? lol

To be honest, I don't remember. It was so long ago that I saw it. I'm actually curious to know, though. What are they?

Wow, what a lady! Some of us just can't help ourselves. How I would have liked to know her, lol.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Very hard question, Paul. As far as I recall it's a film about a bloke called Harold who hangs around cemeteries and an old dear called Maude who teaches him how to enjoy life to the full each day. Can't see how you'd get any new words out of that.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Monumentophilia and polyvivatism. Well, that's what David Gest just told me, and he should know, being a top bloke as regards vocabulary (I'm A Celebrity - Get Me Out Of Here 2006).
 

Paul Rogers

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Y'know Bob, thinking about it, you're absolutely right, it must have been a duff question. Let's just go with the words suggested by Mon and David Gest; they sound pretty good to me.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Well, Mon was certainly moving in the right direction with the clues. However, her answers can't be right because those words are already assigned. A Monumentophiliac was a person willing to consort with Catherine the Great (David Gest wouldn't have said no), and polyvivatism is a rare mental condition characterised by the patient's belief that he is Long John Silver come back to life.
 

Paul Rogers

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Well, as the film is called Harold and Maude, why don't we just go for Harolding (meaning to be terrified of being struck in the eye by an arrow) and Maudism (meaning a fear of Scottish shepherds).
 

Paul Rogers

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...or Guest with a U.

Such poor spelling reminds me of someone called Ahll who used to post here a few years ago. ;-)

Talking of illiterate celebrities (or their mothers, at least) I have it on good authority that Roald Dahl's mum confessed on her deathbed that she never did get the hang of spelling 'Ronald'...
 
May 3, 2002
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"I would have said that setting the AOC at 75 would cause a problem, since most if not all of those over 75 probably don't (or rarely) have sex"

I rest my case. it would solve a lot of problems.
never mind pedophiles or Lolitas We would now have the justice systems working overtime just to keep up!
Talk about a growth industry we could have a prison in every town.

Martin
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Now that I have time to address this discussion for the last time . . .

Blast!

David quite unrepentant, and called me an illiterate idiot.
Solution: read a book. That's what I do. You'll find that it does wonders.


A Monumentophiliac was a person willing to consort with Catherine the Great (David Gest wouldn't have said no), and polyvivatism is a rare mental condition characterised by the patient's belief that he is Long John Silver come back to life.

Not likely. The proper denotations to terms like Monumentophilia, polyvivatism, Harolding, and Maudism--if these are, indeed, real words--can be ascertained by breaking down the linguistic components--called morphemes--and performing an analysis that way.

As everybody knows, philia, based on the Old Greek Philios, means love[r] of..., but the word monumento, which although in a connotative sense suggests something of tribute, has no specific reference to Catherine the Great. This word reflects awe and respect to great things. The word poly, also Greek, means many, followed by the Latin "viv-," which is a morphemic inference to life. This can be seen in non-English Latin-based infinitives such as vivre and vivir, which both translate as to live in French and Spanish respectively. The suffix "-ism" indicates, among other things, a state-of-being, which can include the notion known as a belief in... Together, these three morphemes form the word poly + viva[t]- + ism. No specific reference exists here to Long John Silver, which makes your assertion weak on all accounts. The love of great things and the belief in [or] state of living many lives (or) the belief in [or] state of reincarnation, then, are the most likely meanings to monumentophilia and polyvivatism as derived from their root words respectively.

In essence, what I am saying is this: If these words are real (and I doubted it the moment I read them), you arrived at the wrong definitions, at least from a linguistic standpoint.


why don't we just go for Harolding (meaning to be terrified of being struck in the eye by an arrow) and Maudism (meaning a fear of Scottish shepherds).
This isn't likely either. "-ing," of course, is a present progressive affix applied to English verbs. This suggests that Harolding must be a verb conjugated in the present progressive. Harold is a name, so turning it into a verb makes no sense. In order to infer meaning here, we'd have to find the closest relation to the name. That word would be herald, which is a messenger. This word, though, can be used as a verb. Herald as a verb means to announce the approach of [someone or something]. The word heralding (transforming the 'a' to 'o' and the 'o' to 'a' for the necessary sake of clarity) signifies the act of announcing an approach.

By the way, all words in English denoting a fear end with the suffix -phobia, from xenophobe--also of Greek origin. These words are collectively encoded as such. Keeping this rule in mind, neither Harolding nor Maudism could possibly refer to the fear of anything.

It's always nice to put two advanced degrees to work!
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Now that this pointless exchange has been straightened out perhaps we can return to the original topic of this thread...


never mind pedophiles or Lolitas
Just as a side note, Martin, please remember that adults attracted to adolescents are not pedophiles (yet another Greek word!), who, according to the APA DSM IV, are adults, either female or male, predominantly or solely attracted to prepubescent children 12/13 and under. Those drawn to teens, at least casually, are considered psychologically normative, since many humans throughout history and even in the world today have this sexual impulse imbued within their psyches. Hell, advertising capitalizes on that! Teenagers are (more or less) sexually mature, prepubescent children are not.

A couple of relatively new words to account for those who are attracted primarily to individuals between 14 and 17 (sometimes 19) are ephebophilia and hebephilia and are not synonymous in any way with pedophilia, other than the latter's constantly incorrect social implications regarding sex between adults and teens who are minors. Still, the term Lolita is a much more recognized term that fits the bill, although Humbert Humbert is drawn to a girl who is 12, which is an attraction that falls in the extreme upper category of pedophilia, so that word might be incorrect as well to refer to teens. The word you want, though, is predator, and there certainly are more than enough of these. *shudder*

Anyway, I apologize for my digression. If the AOC was as high as 75, everyone would be arrested for engaging in criminal sex acts. Consider that every single baby born would be the result of a crime and therefore a dishonorable shame to its society. No, 75 is much too high, but I get your point.
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I've noticed this is not directly connected to the original topic, which I posted, but I wanted to address your comments first, Martin. I ask that someone please take this thread back to the Titanic. After all, this is a Titanic site, not a site on law or sex. Thank you.

Have a very pleasant day, all!
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Bob Godfrey

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Which reminds me, Paul, where can I can get one of those pirate keyboards you mentioned in another thread? My Uncle Norman has polyvivatism something chronic and we need some way of communicating with him.
 

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