All cabins connected to each other

Jul 11, 2001
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Hi Carl, The room combinations were limitless. Depending on the size of your family or party. I would think the Steward would lock the doors as dictated by the pursers passenger list.
 

Hitch

Member
Jan 6, 2006
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Thanks David.
So you could never book two cabins the wheren't next to each other?
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Carl,

You certainly could, you'd just have to exit one and walk to the other. There are plenty of examples of passengers booking cabins either for fellow companions or maids, that were not next to each other.

Daniel.
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
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Hi Daniel,

If you book two adjacent rooms, there was no door leading the next room, or were there?

Thanks
 
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Brian R Peterson

Guest
Jeremy,

If you look at plans for B and C Deck you can see that most of the suite and period cabins are connected to each other.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Jeremy,

In addition most of the outside rooms on C-deck were arranged in 3's with inter-communications doorways and a bathroom.
On D and E-decks in 4's with inter-communication doorways.
 
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Richard Coplen

Guest
I would've thought that with interconnecting doors - noise from adjoining cabins would have been somewhat greater. Also what about peeping toms through key-holes in adjoining cabins??? It all seems somewhat inconvenient.
 

Lee Gilliland

Member
Feb 14, 2003
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Peeping Toms in adjoining cabins were a known hazard - same with hotel rooms and rooms in private houses. And the convenience of being able to expand these rooms into suites overran the concerns about noise - you didn't spend that much time in your cabin during the day unless you were either changing clothes or convalescent, anyway.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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I say, Lee! They must have solved the problem by the time I came along (very, very much later I'd have you know, but the solution wasn't that technological) because in places I stayed in there was a bolt on each side of the party door to, say, a shared bathroom or an adjoining room, and you just shot the bolt on your side and you were safe. No keyholes, just bolts. Didn't stop people banging on the door, shouting "How much longer are you going to be?" though.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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>>Didn't stop people banging on the door, shouting "How much longer are you going to be?" though.<<

Sounds like college for me. You'd think that each 1st-class passenger/booking would have had it's own bathroom. Yes, yes, I know: money and space! But that would definitely have been more convenient. After all, toilet time is no light matter.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Well, money and space are a consideration, but I think also just expectation. People didn't expect their own bathroom back then. Actually, I've just thought of a couple of questions of my own concerning bathrooms, but since I'm the organiser, I'd better be a good girl and go off to LoB/personal hygiene to ask them .....
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hello Jonathan,

There were a number of different prices for rooms with private bathrooms. For 1 passenger a special stateroom with a private bathroom on C-deck was £125 [that is $625 US dollars].

Depending on the room you had the cost of the private bath and loo was either £35 [$175]; or £45 [$225].
 

Lee Gilliland

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Feb 14, 2003
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I wonder if they had different keys for each adjoining door - you could leave the key in the lock, can't see much then.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I may be mistaken...wouldn't be the first time...but my understanding is that keys were not issued to the passengers but were instead retained by the stewards. Perhaps one of the passenger/crew researchers could add some insights on this.
 
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Brian R Peterson

Guest
Hi All,

>>my understanding is that keys were not issued to the passengers but were instead retained by the stewards.<<

The passengers themselves were not given keys, and Michael is correct in his understanding of this.

The Purser and the stewards / esses both had master keys which operated all of the locks enabling them access to every cabin in their area including the inter-cabin doors.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
Sep 1, 2004
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In 1912, suite reflected a original french meaning of "suite" (retinue, suite). Passenger could book one room for himself and his wife, second for childerns and third for servant or maid etc. Then were the suites connected to each other.
 
May 7, 2005
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Of course the rooms connecting to one another provided the ideal purpose for having a travelling party. I believe the passengers would appear at the Purser's Office on C Deck and it would be arranged to have the doors to staterooms that were not in your party to be locked. I'm not sure if this is true but it seems only logical. The fact that the wealthiest man on the ship chose connecting C Deck staterooms instead of connecting B Deck staterooms is more than I can fathom though.