All cabins connected


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Jul 28, 2005
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Hello everybody, this is my first post, well i'm so glad to write you my dear friends, i'm seventeen years old and i live in Chile,anyway, i saw the titanic deckplans and took my attention that almost all the cabins (on b deck for example)were connected, this doors were opened freely for the passengers, i mean , they could walk onto the next room freely, even if its occupants was not known for them?
well i know that you will answer me,
PS: in my country we speak spanish, so i can help you when you need help or you've got troubles.
ok see you
 
Jul 20, 2000
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Hello Jonathan,

Welcome. It is my understand that unless two or more rooms were booked together doors between the rooms would be locked to prevent other passengers being able to walk into the next room.
 
Jul 28, 2005
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Thanks Lester,you helped me too much, now i've got another question, the rooms were divided in berths, if the people that share a room needs to change clothes for instance, they have to do it with the people that they travelled watching them? how many berths were in a room?
 
Jul 20, 2000
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Hello Jonathan,

A berth is equal to a bed. The number of beds/berths per room varied from 1, 2 or 3 berth in 1st Class up to a few 10 berth rooms in 3rd Class.
 
May 5, 2005
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>>>the rooms were divided in berths, if the people that share a room needs to change clothes for instance, they have to do it with the people that they travelled watching them? how many berths were in a room?<<<
The 3rd class had only community washrooms or bathrooms, any significant stripping down would probably take place there. In the cabins, men of steerage would probably have just slept in their long underwear, which probably didn't come off very often. In those days, bathing was a weekly to monthly ritual at best. Hard to imagine, since most of us in the western world take baths or showers daily, which raises a question with me; Did 3rd class even have showers or tubs??? Or were they thought unnecessary?? I would love to know the answer!!
 

Mick Molloy

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Nov 29, 2002
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Steve

"In those days, bathing was a weekly to monthly ritual at best"

It must have been, at least in rural areas. In the fifties and sixties in rural Ireland we had no running water. Each Saturday evening my grandad brought the barrel in from under the eve-run and my granny boiled water in a big pot on an open fire. The hot water was put into the barrel and the water in it became tepid. We then all had a standing up bath, one after each other in the kitchen. Children first, then off to bed and then the adults.

I am not so sure that all men in rural areas, even in 1960, forget 1912, wore underwear. It could not be afforded.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Steve, though the 3rd Class passengers were provided with only two bathrooms (just aft of the 3rd Class Entrance stairway on D deck), most of their cabins at the stern, which were occupied by single women and families, were furnished individually with wash stands.

When I grew up in England in the 1950s showers were unknown and bathrooms quite rare in working class housing in town or country. My bath nights were similar to Mick's, except that we used a 'tin bath' (actually galvanised iron) which at other times was hung from a nail on an outside wall. For most of us this weekly ritual was regarded as quite sufficient. We unhooked the bath only when we felt we needed to, and took the view that nobody except coal miners really needed to bathe every day.

If you're interested in this kind of stuff, explore the threads in the 'Gilded Age' and 'Life on Board' sections of the forum, where there have been detailed discussions about personal hygiene in the Edwardian era.
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Aug 15, 2005
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My bath nights were similar to Mick's, except that we used a 'tin bath' (actually galvanised iron) which at other times was hung from a nail on an outside wall.

You're showing your age, Bob.

most of their cabins at the stern, which were occupied by single women and families, were furnished individually with wash stands.

So does this mean that the cabins up forward (specifically C-33) didn't have washstands?
 
Jun 11, 2000
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I've got a few friends who are medical researchers, and they are variously very exercised by the effects of the modern obsession with hygiene, and particularly with petroleum-based products- shampoos, shower-gels etc. They seem unconvinced that escalating levels of skin cancer are due entirely to exposure to sunlight, which is obviously hardly new. Also aluminium-based deodorants / anti-perspirants seem fingered as villains.

So maybe we should stop trying to be so physically perfect the whole time, and put Bob's galvanised metal bathtub back on a nail on the outside wall, and just do the bath once a week...although I don't have very fond memories of the strip-down washes one had to do in a freezing bathroom in between times. My family did have a bathroom, but even so, the nice deep hot bath was a far less frequent occurrence than the two showers a day my sons seem unable to do without.

I sometimes wonder about how odiferous the 1950s and 1960s actually were in Britain. Coal fires everywhere, everyone smoking, fewer baths and less efficient deodorants etc. But although I shudder at the thought in retrospect, I can't honestly say I remember much about the pong of society at the time ... except the cinema. Everyone puffing away, and the smell of wet raincoat adding to the horror. It must have been the same on buses and trains, I think.

I lit a coal fire a couple of years ago when I first uncovered my Edwardian fireplace, and the entire neighbourhood smelt it and asked about it the next day. Smokeless fuel, nowadays. A fire is something you have in secret...

But as Bob says, there's plenty about this fascinating topic in Gilded Age and Life on Board.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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You recommend a bathe once a week, Mon? What, every week? Have you seen the price of soap these days?

Ryan, I was writing about the 3rd Class cabins. Those located forward generally didn't have the luxury of washing facilities, so the men quartered there had to make use of the communal washrooms. But you have asked specifically about C-33, which was a 1st Class cabin. That one had a folding lavatory, intended for use in the original sense of the word - for washing.
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Aug 15, 2005
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C-33 was First Class?
Which git told me it was the cabin I wanted then?
I changed it in my book and everything!

Ok, you're going down from the Third Class Open Space to F deck on the main stairwell.
You get to F deck, and practically directly in front of you, across a fore-aft corridor, is a transverse corridor lined on the left by the casing for number 2 hatch.
On the right are three cabins, each of four berths. What number is the number of the first of the three?

That's my cabin.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Ah, you mean Cabin 33 in C Section (the 3rd Class cabins had no prefix letters). Two double-decker bunks and a hardwood wall-seat in between. That's yer lot. No room to swing your arms, let alone a cat.
 

Bob Godfrey

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You could use the porthole. If you had one. Which you haven't. But you're lucky - going from No 33 up to the facilities on E deck was no great distance - probably less than you were used to to reach the privy at the far end of your back yard. And you didn't get wet along the way if it was raining outside!
 
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