All That Ice


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Apr 7, 2001
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ALL THAT ICE!

Wouldn't you love to figure out why on God's earth did all that ice flow into the path of the world's greatest ocean liner?
huh.gif


Since learning of Titanic, I always thought "Oh, a bit of ice surrounding Titanic." This is not the case. I was astounded to learn more of that ice that floated in the Atlantic at that time of year in April 1912.

Captain Rostron of "Home From The Sea" says, "I may say now that the spring of that year was phenomenal in regard to ice. The Titanic was on her right course, a course where it is true one at times may see ice, but that night was so exceptional as to be unique in anyone's memory. The reason was that two summers before the season had been unusually warm in the far north. Islands of ice had broken adrift from their polar continent and come drifting south. It took two years for these giant remnants to work their way so far south and we were to be amazed when daylight broke to find on every hand berg and floe stretching as far as the eye could reach."

It took TWO YEARS for that ice to find its way to Titanic! ARRRggh. It infuriates me every time I think of it. How dare they! Out of all the vast sea, the ice had to float in the path of the Atlantic run. Blimey!

I guess in those days they did not monitor ice flows from regions such as Greenland or other regions that become glacier-packed. They probably monitor such regions now, just as they monitor earthquakes and tornadoes. Sure wish they had done monitoring back then!

Teri
 

Adam Leet

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May 18, 2001
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Teri, it was not only a coincidence that the ice pack found its way into those shipping lanes, but that is the most common route calved ice takes southward. Thanks to the Labrador current, the ice has a sort of free ticket down the east coast. Icebergs have been sighted as far south as Bermuda, as I recall, so it wasn't something that should be too surprising.

Oh, well. No one can predict the weather perfectly, at least. Especially not in 1912.


Adam
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Adam,

The weathermen of today can't predict weather either!

I wonder what would have happened to Titanic had she been made of wood. Would she have crumpled like a piece of paper? EEEeek! I'd hate to think so!

Well ~ the ice had its path, the Titanic had her path. Hence, what a meeting!

Beverly,

Thanks for the fantasic link! Wow, those infrared shots of the Ross Ice Shelf were impressive! But one thing, I couldn't decipher anywhere on that page what the length of those bergs is!

The time it took to load those huge images was well worth the wait!

Teri
 
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