All the Horrors Seem to Happen at Night

Mike Poirier

Mike Poirier

Member
Congratulations to Inger on such a wonderful article. The solid research that went into it kept me interested from the first word through the last.

I also enjoyed the new pictures of Moody.
Excellent job!
Mike
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Indeed. It's good to see something meaty on the early career of a surprisingly obscure and little known officer. This tears some of that mystery away. Well done, Inger!
 
1

181214

Guest
Enjoyed every minute.

Superb work, done by a superb researcher.

Well done Inger and many thanks for giving us an insight into a part of Moody's life.

Andrew W.
 
G

Gary Cooper

Member
Nice one Inger, very interesting. Moody has always seemed one of the obscure souls on the bridge of the Titanic, nice to see him given some due.
 
Dave Gittins

Dave Gittins

Member
Well researched and well written! Above all, it's not over-written.
 
J

Jesse D O'Neill

Member
Inger

Great Article. It will come in good use for future researchers on the subject
 
Ryan McKeefery

Ryan McKeefery

Member
That was fantastic, Inger.
Well worded, well researched and very interesting, although I couldn't read it all in one sitting. I hope to see another soon.
Regards, Ryan.
 
Inger Sheil

Inger Sheil

Member
Many thanks for all your feedback and comments - they are much appreciated.

Glad you liked the photos, Mike P! I tried to select images more contemporaneous with his early career, rather than the two c.1911-1912 images that are so often used. The first portrait, with the broad collar, was taken while he was attending the Rosebery House School in Scarborough, c. 1901.

The image of the fireboat comes from a postcard in my collection. Although undated, the caption refers to a Hoboken fire starting in the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad yards, which leads me to believe that it was the fire Moody witnessed in 1904. The pc is not unusual, and was issued as late as the early teens.

Dave, I'm very pleased that you feel the piece was not overwritten. I had to resist the temptation to add an editorial gloss, as the letters are so rich in source material for the last days in sail that they offer much for analysis and commentary. I thought it would be better to keep the narrative as simple and direct as possible, as Moody writes a crackingly good yarn. I didn't want the barrier of my own 'interpretation' to stand between his story and the reader.

I'm also pleased that people feel that some of the mystery has been stripped away. I particularly wanted to address the idea that I've encountered in some circles - that Moody, as the youngest and most junior officer, was somehow inexperienced when he joined the Titanic. The Boadicea's crossing to New York was just the beginning for him - he was to experience other ferocious storms at sea. On one occasion, as they sailed through the Straits of Magellan in weather that ripped the doors off cabins, his explosives-laden steamer was nearly driven onto rocks ('Good job my will's made' he commented laconically). On another occasion his ship was given up for lost when she was overdue - her prop shaft had broken, leaving her helpless. Moody was no naive stripling when he joined the Titanic - he was a seasoned professional.
 
L

Lester Mitcham

Member
Hello Inger,

A splendid well researched and documented paper. It gives a wonderful insight to the life of James Moody.

Regards,
Lester
 
Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
A most enjoyable paper Inger. It gives you a taste of what life was really like and the hardships that were faced. Thanks.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>I particularly wanted to address the idea that I've encountered in some circles - that Moody, as the youngest and most junior officer, was somehow inexperienced when he joined the Titanic. <<

I think you pretty well nuked that one. It's often overlooked that Titanic's officers got their start in sail. In fact, I recall that White Star required such experience. It was a brutal school to learn from too. The sort where incompetants got weeded out very quickly, one way or another.
 
M

monica e. hall

Member
Fascinating article, Inger. I'm thinking of making 19-year old James read it, who complained yesterday about having to shift trays of plants in the rain ....
 
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Jo Durant

Member
Congratulations Inger, well written and well researched.
 
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Remco Hillen

Member
Hello Inger,

Congratulations on the article, very interesting to read.
It gives a very good idea on how a lot of White Star officers started their careers; what a way to do so!


Regards,
Remco
 
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