Alternative times for boat launchings


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Mar 20, 2000
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Many believe boat #8 left BEFORE #6 rather than after, which is in the official record, there's evidence that #C left later as well, and some (like me)believe that #1 left later too.

#8 - apart from Gracie's evidence and others already cited in past threads, steward Burke has an interesting take. He testified that when he reported to his boat station, #1, that the boat had gone. He says he then went over to port and helped to lower #8. This shows these boats did not go off simultaneously at 1:10 AM as the official record reflects. Obviously #8 went after. However Burke says after seeing #8 lowered he went to help launch #10, which went off at 1:20. Why didn't he go to #6 if it was still on deck as Gracie believes?(Gracie implies #6 went off after #10 at about 1:25). Either Gracie was mistaken or, as I think, #6 was not on the boat deck BUT WAS on its way down, possibly suspended mid-ways which is why Burke didn't see it and went aft. It must have been at this interval that Peuchen slid down the fall to fill in for the crew in #6. This delay would have allowed #8 to get down into the water first. Meantime #10 had either already put down or was touching the water simultaneously as #6.

#1 - I've already gone into this on other threads but I'll repeat briefly that because of #1's getting caught up on its way down it probably really was not successfully launched till 1:15 or 1:20. But I do think it was prepared for initial lowering at the accepted 1:10 time.

#C - There seems to have been extraordinary delay in getting this boat off. Hugh Woolner's testimony is very specific on the point that #C was STILL on board while #D was being fitted into its davits. He surely was in a position to know as he was in the vicinity all during this time and was in fact on A Deck when the water came over the forward railings and he and others jumped headlong into #D, then on its way down. He says he estimated the gap between the deck and the gunwale of #D was nine feet which, if true, shows there was a fairly severe port list which may well be the reason why #C, high on the starboard side, had such a hard time getting off. George Behe has estimated that #C therefore was not launched till round 2 AM.

Are there any other lifeboat launching discrepancies?
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Dear Randy,
Don;t know if this counts for what you are trying to do, but there seem to be a lot of discrepancies regarding any form of discussion about the collaspsibles...whether they were launched, whether all were used and so on.
Maureen.
 
Mar 20, 2000
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Maureen,

Call me dumb - I never knew there was any doubt the collapsibles were used. And I thought their launches were both aborted - and they just ended up floating off. Very interesting. Maybe we'll hear more about this. Thanks doll.

Randy
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Hello Randy, C and D were successfully launched...and a real miricle too as they were all stored on the deckhouses instead of next to the davits where hooking them up would have been a lot less awkward. They actually managed to get A into the falls of the davits, but had to cut it loose when the ship nosedived. They weren't so lucky with B. This one landed upside down on the deck and had to be floated off as well. Something like 31 people used it as a liferaft.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Nathan Heddle

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Hey Randy,

As Michael said, all the collapsibles were launched but only two successfully. D was one of the last boats to leave the ship I think, and this was the boat Col. Gracie dumped Mrs Brown, and that Miss Evans walked away from. It was also the boat the Navratil children were placed in.

C was the boat that Ismay and William Carter both hopped into, but along with D these were the only two successful ones launched.

A managed to get floated off, but the first occupants were washed out, I believe, and then more hopped in, but it was full of water.

B ended up floating upside down with a whole heap of men on it. These included Charles Lightholler Harold Bride and Jack Thayer. Most of these were changed into boats 4, 8 and 12 I believe.

As per usual the ones that left successfully were undermanned and only half full.

Have a look at the lifeboat part at this site, it really is quite good.

hope this helps,

nathan
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Sorry, didn;t mean to turn the question into a collapsible topic. The discrepancies that I was referring to were ones that came within a few days of the accident, but I believe many of these have been resolves over time.

I apologize for misleading folks, youa re actually looking for lifeboat questions that have remained and perplex us today. Sorry about that Randy, my mistake. Then, I am the one who is dumb Randy...

Maybe some can add some commentary, but it seems to me that there has been some discussion about who all was saved by that turned over collapsible, but did not make the whole trip to the Carpathia.
Maureen.
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

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Mrs. Carter supposedly divorced her husband on account that he left the Titanic before she did. This would prove true according to official timing of boat departures, but not true in reality. Mr. Carter said he placed his wife in a boat and then went off ... and obviously went to the boat deck, on the starboard side. There the collapsible was still hanging and so he got in. If #4 left at about 1:50 or 1:55, this gave plenty of time for Carter to go to boat C and leave at 2AM. Mrs. Carter would have known her husband put her in the boat and then went off, I guess she was just looking for an excuse to divorce him. It wasn’t his fault that C arrived at Carpathia's side before #4.

Daniel.
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Daniel wrote:

>Mrs. Carter would have known her husband put her >in the boat and then
>went off, I guess she was just looking for an >excuse to divorce him.

Hi, Daniel!

Absolutely. In 1912 Mrs. Carter told reporters that her husband had put her and their son into a lifeboat, but she seems to have changed her tune after the divorce proceedings began. (Strange, isn't it?.) :)

All my best,

George
 
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Gavin Murphy

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I appreciate this is the wrong place for this posting, but just don't know where else to put it. Now I do know that George B is a leading light on the lifeboat launchings, so maybe he or someone else could clarify this point for me.

I was looking through my T books yesterday because I seem to recall that around 1910 or so it was raised in the UK Parl. that ocean liners should increase their lifeboat capacity. I seem to recall that the matter really went nowhere, until, of course, the T disaster. And, for some reason, I seem to remember the MP that raised this matter was one Horatio Bottomley. Does any of this ring a bell? I would appreciate any further comments on this matter.

Regards,


G
 

Mike Herbold

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Dec 13, 1999
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Your memory about Bottomley is correct. It's in Chapter 18 of the Eaton- Haas book "Titanic - Triumph and Tragedy."
 
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