Andrea Doria


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sharon rutman

Guest
Did anyone check out the NY times on Saturday 9/23/06? On page Bl is an article called From Death Ship to Cruise ship--the Stockholm is back in service renamed the Athena.
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
Wow. I didn't think the Stockholm was even in existence any more. I would have imagined she would have been scrapped with all that damage. Well, good luck this time around.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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The Athena came to Sydney in early March this year, and berthed at 8 Darling Harbour - opposite the Museum. I know I'm not the only one who took at least a few minutes to look across to her, thinking of her history.
 
Apr 26, 2006
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I saw the Stockholm (or 'Volker' as she was then)in the late 80s when she was laid up in Ocean Dock Southampton.I was right on the dockside looking her over,seeing a strangely familiar stunning classic liner design but not realising what she had been in a previous life.It was only later when I realised that I had seen the Stockholm. Unfortunately I had forgotten my camera so have no record of that day in my albums.Does anyone know where I may be able to obtain such photos?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>I would have imagined she would have been scrapped with all that damage. <<

Hi Sharon, the Stockholm was a fairly new ship then, and very fortunately, the collision bulkhead held up. Repairing it probably wasn't seen as a very big deal from a technical standpoint, and with a lot of service life left, the owners could justify the cost.

Had that bulkhead failed, there would be two ships in the grave occupied by the Andrea Doria.
 

Matthew Lips

Member
Mar 8, 2001
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Poor old Andrea Doria. Of all the ships in the world she had to get clobbered by one that appears indestructible!

It's kind of nice to see the ex-Stockholm still around, even though I could be shot for saying this (especially as I will be in Genoa in a couple of weeks time).

Although she has undergone any number of facelifts and is barely recognisable as the 1956 destroyer of Italian maritime pride, she remains one of the precious few remaining, active links to the glory days of passenger liners. We have to take what we can get, and anyway, what happened was hardly the ship's fault. She only went where she was pointed!

If by some chance she ever makes it to South Africa, I'd like to go and check the old girl out.
 
Dec 3, 2005
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>>BTW, her stern is very funky!<<

Looks like she had a sore behind so they gave her a pillow to sit on. Does anyone know the reason for that oddly shaped tail of hers?
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
Would you book passage on the newly revamped Stockholm/Athena considering her dubious past history. Just wondering.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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Oh, I'd owe it to myself to book passage on her. Looking at the revamped ship, I can see nothing recognizable from her original architecture. She was quite practically built anew.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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From MSNBC:

The Death of a Great Ocean Liner
quote:

It was about 3 a.m. July 25, 1956 when the phone rang at my bedside. It was Bill Corley on the network news desk.

“Gabe, the Andrea Doria has been in a collision with a Swedish ship, the Stockholm, off Nantucket," he told me. "Get down to Coast Guard headquarters at the Battery as fast as you can. They’re coordinating search and rescue operations from there.”￾
More at http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43888213/ns/local_news-new_york_ny/

Comment: This is the guy who was the voice on the film which recorded the ship's sinking 55 years ago.​
 

John Clifford

Member
Mar 30, 1997
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Reported, today: "Gardena (California) man dies while diving to the wreck of the Andrea Doria".

See http://www.dailybreeze.com/news/ci_18569244

Apparently, the victim slipped off a descent line, and was separated from a diving partner.
His body was found on Sunday.

According to the article, this makes "16" the number of divers killed at the Andrea Doria site.
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
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It's a sad irony to consider that more people have been killed diving on the wreck site over the years than people who actually died in the sinking itself.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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.... more people have been killed diving on the wreck site over the years than people who actually died in the sinking itself.


UPPER DECK:
Carlin, Mrs.Jeanette U-46 (Died of internal injuries on the Stockholm's bow)
Cianfarra, Miss Joan U-52
Cianfarra, Mr. Camille U-54 (Died of internal injuries)
Peterson, Mrs. Martha U-56 (Died of internal injuries)

4

FOYER DECK:
Thieriot, Mr. Ferdinand "Pete" F-180
Thieriot, Mrs. Frances

2

A DECK:
Iazetta, Mrs. Amelia
Corvino, Mrs. Christina
Carola, Miss Margaret (Above 3 women were trapped in A-230 and died when the ship rolled on to its side the next morning)
Russo, Mr. Michael.
Russo, Mrs. Maria.
Russo, Miss Giovanna
Russo, Miss Vincenza (The Russo family was in A-228)
Sister Mary Grechi
Sister Mary Angelina Gonzales
"4 women traveling single"

13

C DECK. Was at the waterline. These cabins almost immediately flooded. Two survivors from the collision area described what those lost on C Deck likely experienced.
Sergio, Mrs. Maria
Sergio, Master Giuseppe
Sergio, Master Rocco
Sergio, Miss Anna Maria
Sergio, Miss Domenica. (The Sergio family was in C-656. The occupants of the cabin diagonal to the Sergios in the cabin block were the only survivors from the C-Deck collision area. The outboard wall of their room suddenly caved in and water almost immediately poured in upon them. Within seconds, it was up to their necks as they struggled to pull their door open. A beam fell from the ceiling and they used it to batter the door open)
Diana, Mrs. Angelina
Diana, Master Biaggio
Diana, Miss Victoria
Cirincione, Mr. Giuseppe
Cirincione, Mrs. Rosalia
Baratta, Mrs. Rosa
Baratta, Miss Agnese
Guzzi, Mr. Giuseppe
Guzzi, Mrs. Antonietta
DiGrandi, Mr. Giuseppe
DiGrandi, Mrs. Lucia
Palmieri, Mr. Domenico
Palmieri, Mrs. Francesca
Zumbo, Mr. Vincenzo
Zumbo, Mrs. Rose
5 single women travelers

26

DIED AFTER RESCUE

DiSandro, Miss Norma (Fractured skull, when she was dropped off the ship into a lifeboat)

Grego, Mrs. Julia. (Broke her back when she fell off an escape ladder and struck the side of a lifeboat)

Watres, Mr. Carl. (Died of a heart attack aboard the Ile de France, after aiding in the escape operations all night)

3

Total: 47

(Among the single women travellers were Mrs. Laura Bremmermann, Mrs. Marie Imbellone, Mrs. Josephine Ferraro, Mrs. Concetta DiMiche, Miss Maria DiLuzio, Mrs. Teresa Del Guardio, Mrs. Anita Leone. It is impossible to determine who of these roomed with whom, or an which deck)
 
Dec 2, 2000
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The Andrea Doria ain't called the Mount Everest of shipwrecks for nuthin.

Cold waters, treacherous and unpredictable currents, and deep enough that only highly trained and experienced tech divers have any business of even thinking about attempting it. One of our own members lost his life doing this...(Remember David Bright?)...and he did know what he was doing having made the dive before.

Amatures need not apply unless they've first made their peace with whatever god(s) they believe in.
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
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Jim:

You need to get out more.
Seriously though, I was under the impression that the official death toll for the ship was much less than that, consisting largely of those who were killed either on impact with the Stockholm or very shortly afterwards when the water flooded into nearby cabins - 11 hours and more modern technology allowed for the rescue of others.

And I don't think those who died after the sinking should be included on the official list of casualties.

Michael:

Doesn't matter how much training you've had or how many years of experience you've got, there is always a huge risk in dives like that and it's certainly not something you'd want to be attempting if you didn't have a will drawn up. But, risk = reward and no doubt it's been a brilliant experience for those who have done it successfully.

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>And I don't think those who died after the sinking should be included on the official list of casualties.<<

None of the people Jim listed are diving casualties, Adam. They were just the poor sods who were along for the ride.

That said, the Andrea Doria continues to kill people but this falls in the catagory of self-inflicted wound. You got it right: it shouldn't be attempted unless you have your will made up.
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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>And I don't think those who died after the sinking should be included on the official list of casualties.

That's like saying that shooting victims who die in the hospital shouldn't be included in the yearly crime statistics. Miss DiSandro died from brain swelling a day or two after the disaster. Mrs. Grego was hospitalized for six months before she died. In both cases, the deaths were directly attributable to injuries incurred during the disaster.

Carl Watres was a different situation. He was within a year or two of my age, and spent the night rescuing other passengers. He was extremely nauseous when he and his wife boarded the Ile de France. They laid down on deck chairs later in the morning. His wife went to get food and, according to witnesses, he gasped, stood up, and fell over already dead. Heart attack. HIS death can be attributed to the horrible inefficiency of the Doria crew who, for the most part, left the passengers to their own devices. Had he played a passive role and just sat there, he would likely have lived. BUT, had the younger passengers just sat there, there would probably have been more accidents like those that killed Mrs. Grego and Miss DiSandro.

>You need to get out more

Oh, I get out enough, thanks for the concern. However, if one is going to do passenger research, one must quickly commit to memory as much of the names and relevant biographical information as possible. That way you are never caught without your notes should a research opportunity arise.

So, I carry with me the names of every Doria victim, every Morro Castle passenger, and every Lusitania victim we have not yet traced. And I've never been caught short fumbling for written notes that arent there.

>...(Remember David Bright?)...

Very well. I had swapped emails with him a few days before his death..... told him about the sculpture that Mary Urban, widow of art nouveau master Joseph Urban, had put on display in the cabin class lounge for that voyage. The sculpture, and all of the notes and material she had collected for her book about Joseph, were left aboard the ship. The artwork is somewhere in the mud on the bottom of the lounge. Mary's notes and material, if stored in a leather carrying case, might still be salvageable from the srea of her cabin. He found this interesting, but died before any additional research could be done.
 

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