Andrews and Rose


S

sharon rutman

Guest
I think the story was the other way around--Rose had a thing for Andrews!!! How brazen can you get.
 

Maddie Ciemny

Member
Aug 3, 2017
1
0
11
In the script it says he "fell under rose's spell" so I believe that Cameron wanted it to seem like he was interested in rose, but not like he had a full on crush.
 

Emilie

Member
Aug 10, 2013
89
17
58
36
Saint-Étienne, France
Well, he might have played a huge part .
When Rose is in the water shortly after Titanic's final plunge, a man grips her, holding for dear life and pushes her underwater. Without lifebelt, she would have drowned in a matter of seconds.
Also, when after Jack dies, she is so exhausted that also without it, she wouldn't have reached the death crew member's whistle to call back the lifeboat in extremis to pick her up.
I believe also if true, Andrews might have played that part in Rose's rescue by inadvertently, he wanted to help a little, but when he sees her in the smoking room, he's looking as he knows both her and Jack have virtually no chance of survival, and he's just showing the esteem he has for Rose by offering his lifevest. Of course also he could not have foreseen all what will happen next to Rose.
What do you think?
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Kyle Naber

Member
Oct 5, 2016
1,156
630
188
20
He probably was just giving it to her as a gesture of human compassion. Yes, they were all gonna die and yes, in the end, it all didn't matter, so the least he could do was hand her a simple life jacket. A lot of what Thomas Andrews did throughout the corse of thr night was encourage people to put on life belts and to get into boats and I think Cameron captured that (although not in the final film) in the deleted scenes and in the scene you describe.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Cam Houseman

Member
Jul 14, 2020
2,140
492
158
16
Maryland, USA
Hi !

I don't think it was Camerons intention to make them look like they're kind of falling in love or something like that. From what I've read Thomas Andrews was an extraordinary man who cared alot and paid much attention to the people around him, and people trusted a lot in him and his opinion. When the disaster occurred he still stayed calm (at least he made it seem so). He seemed to have the same "gift" like Jack and "see people" cause after the collision passengers and crew met him and asked him about it and he had just the right words for everybody, even the most different characters.

So when you remember that he even watched the workmens crew with kind of "familiar" eyes (remember that scene at the port that his wife described later) I think that Cameron tried to show this special characteristic, to have an open ear for everybody and being very understanding and a sensitive and warm-hearted man.

... uh what a melancholic morning... ;)

See you all later,
Christine
I wonder if he met Mr. Joseph, the only Black man on Titanic. Was Andrews, uhm, a little racist? Im sure Thomas Andrews was a very open-minded man
 

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
213
356
108
He did not looked down upon people with different religions, social-class or skincolour. During the delivery voyage he ordered to have insulting Anti-Catholic sologans that insulted the Pope Pius the Fifth. While he oposed the Home Rule it only had to do with the economic consequences if Ireland was to leave the United Kingdom. The only time he was quite shocked regarding the lower-class was when a third class passengers on the Olympic her maiden voyage did not used the lavatories meant for them and did their, well, business on the litosilo floor.

He was a caring man who cared a lot about the people around him. From his fellow directors to the workmen at Harland and Wolff, from the first class passengers to the crewmembers on-board vessels he served on. He was described as " the best known among our division " by Victualling crew since he always listened to them. So I can assure you he would have treated Joseph LaRoche friendly as a gentleman.


Yours sincerely,

Thomas
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
As much as I am a great fan of " A Night To Remember" I would have to put Michael Goodliffe and Victor Garber in an even tie as the best actors in both the 1958 and 1997 movies, especially in portraying Thomas Andrews.
Victor Garber does seem to come off more three-dimensional as has been mentioned by others, though.
 

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
213
356
108
1. Is there a word missing here? 2. Pius V was from the 16th century. The Pope in 1912 was Pius X.
I forgot the add 'removed', I am terribly sorry but I was about to go to bed at the time and was quite tired. I sadly cannot edit so I can correct my mistake.
 
Last edited:

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
213
356
108
As much as I am a great fan of " A Night To Remember" I would have to put Michael Goodliffe and Victor Garber in an even tie as the best actors in both the 1958 and 1997 movies, especially in portraying Thomas Andrews.
Victor Garber does seem to come off more three-dimensional as has been mentioned by others, though.
His portayal is very less accurate than Goodliffe's however.
 

Cam Houseman

Member
Jul 14, 2020
2,140
492
158
16
Maryland, USA
He did not looked down upon people with different religions, social-class or skincolour. During the delivery voyage he ordered to have insulting Anti-Catholic sologans that insulted the Pope Pius the Fifth. While he oposed the Home Rule it only had to do with the economic consequences if Ireland was to leave the United Kingdom. The only time he was quite shocked regarding the lower-class was when a third class passengers on the Olympic her maiden voyage did not used the lavatories meant for them and did their, well, business on the litosilo floor.

He was a caring man who cared a lot about the people around him. From his fellow directors to the workmen at Harland and Wolff, from the first class passengers to the crewmembers on-board vessels he served on. He was described as " the best known among our division " by Victualling crew since he always listened to them. So I can assure you he would have treated Joseph LaRoche friendly as a gentleman.


Yours sincerely,

Thomas
thanks!
 

Kate Powell

Member
May 27, 2020
61
55
48
UK
He did not looked down upon people with different religions, social-class or skincolour. During the delivery voyage he ordered to have insulting Anti-Catholic sologans that insulted the Pope Pius the Fifth. While he oposed the Home Rule it only had to do with the economic consequences if Ireland was to leave the United Kingdom. The only time he was quite shocked regarding the lower-class was when a third class passengers on the Olympic her maiden voyage did not used the lavatories meant for them and did their, well, business on the litosilo floor.

He was a caring man who cared a lot about the people around him. From his fellow directors to the workmen at Harland and Wolff, from the first class passengers to the crewmembers on-board vessels he served on. He was described as " the best known among our division " by Victualling crew since he always listened to them. So I can assure you he would have treated Joseph LaRoche friendly as a gentleman.


Yours sincerely,

Thomas

I agree. Stewardess Violet Jessop said that Thomas Andrews did all he could to get better accommodations and bathrooms for the stewards on the Olympic and listened to ideas for changes from the catering department on Titanic that would help make their working lives easier. He also visited the glory hole at the crew members request to accept their thanks for improvements made.

I believe he was a very fair, thoughtful gentleman and it has been said that he was popular with all social classes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Similar threads

Similar threads