Andrews Cabin


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Micheal Napier

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Whilst looking at the cave list I see that the cabin that Andrews was occupied in is not list. I was wondering if this is because Andrews took any cabin that was free?


Thanks
Mike
 

Dan Cherry

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Dec 14, 1999
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Micheal,
Andrews took a cabin (A-36) which was built very late in Titanic's construction (along with A-37, which Fr. Browne took on his journey from Southampton to Queenstown). Dec. 1911 plans do not show the berth, but March 1912 plans do. Whether by accidental omission or purposely so Andrews would have a small bit of privacy, or another reason, a definite answer may not be available...
 
Jan 31, 2001
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I believe those cabins were added so late at the suggestion of Ismay to make Titanic larger than Olympic, or something of the sort.

-B.W.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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All else aside, I think we should remember that the Cave List was not complete, and it may have been drawn up for the information and convenience of a small group of stewards/stewardesses. If a complete list was drawn of cabin assignments, it went down with the ship.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Dave Hudson

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Apr 25, 2001
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Brandon,

The B Deck suites were the principle reason for Titanic's superior size. Rooms A 36-37 were added becaue the A Deck landing in the aft staircase hadn't proved as popular as anticipated on the Olympic. From what I understand, these two rooms were primarily meant for people like Andrews. If there was an official of White Star or H&W, they could stay in these rooms in order to be more centrally located in the ship's public areas. If officials were not making the crossing, they were to be used by passengers who would depart at Queenstown, so that they could be seggragated from the normal passengers. Later in the Olympic's career, she had a set of cabins with the same purpose installed in the forward wing of the Reading and Writing Room.

David
 
Dec 7, 2000
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I have a little theory, but I don't know how much weight it would carry with it.

I’m taking into account that the Cave list was printed before, or not incorporating the bookings of Monday 8 April or after. Thus I personally believe that it could have been printed either Monday morning, or at the end of Sunday. This certainly explains why so many passengers who booked within the two days are not on the list. (Ismay's decision to sail was not finalized till Monday, so he is not even on the list).

Of course there were some people who booked before the printing and are not on the list either (the gamblers, Astors, "Thornes" and the Wicks are those that come to mind).

Anyway, the theory is, Andrews and the other two, part of the H & W guarantee group that were to travel first class were already booked. They however were given complementary tickets, thus priority would be given to paying passengers. Cabins would have been given to these people at the last moment, after the passengers had booked suites and rooms to their likings.

There were other passengers who were not traveling complementary and were not given a cabin (on the Cave list), I think this was so because they simply booked passage on the ship, rather than a particular room, so a specific cabin may not have been allocated to them as yet when the Cave list was printed.

The Queenstown cross channel passengers would have fallen under the same category. Paying only 4 pounds for an overnight trip, their cabins would have been allocated after the New York bound passengers booked the rooms they would occupy for the next 7 days.

Since Titanic was not so heavily booked for its first trip a lot of these passengers I have no doubt got nice cabins. As has been seen Andrews got A36, Fr. Browne A37.

Stead did not get C87 straight away, he would have moved from his original cabin to the larger suite.

Regards,

Daniel.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Thanks. Im pretty good with all the deck plans for each deck but I must have overlooked it. ; )<<

Or maybe you didn't. Some of the plans available on line or in print either don't have the cabin numbers or they are labled incorrectly. The link I posted to the Discovery website has the plans which were put together by Bruce Beveridge and his team. Short of have Bill Sauder's plans or the actual drawings from Harland & Wolff, they would be tough to beat.
 

Andrew M.

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Mar 16, 2020
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Screen_Shot_2020-03-23_at_2.54.33_PM.png
I understand this is fairly older topic, I would like to add an image from the upcoming game "Titanic: Honor and Glory" in which they devs not only included Andrew's Cabin, but included it in their demo walkthrough. The accompanying image is what Andrew's cabin looked like.
 
View attachment 48273I understand this is fairly older topic, I would like to add an image from the upcoming game "Titanic: Honor and Glory" in which they devs not only included Andrew's Cabin, but included it in their demo walkthrough. The accompanying image is what Andrew's cabin looked like.

I have been following this videogame for a long time, I can't wai till it comes out (it's been many years in production now...)!!!
 
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Thomas Krom

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Nov 22, 2017
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Thomas Andrews Jr his stateroom A-36 was fitted out in Harland and Wolff bedroom B style and was among with A-37 the only stateroom on A-deck which was fitted out in a period style. A-37 of-course was occupied by Francis Browne (later known as father Browne) and he took 2 pictures of his stateroom. Francis Browne left the ship in Queenstown among with his pictures. The pictures are here below.



1585642040565.png

1585642049802.png

If you mirror the picture you will have the impression how A-36 looked like.

Yours sincerely,

Thomas
 
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Andrew M.

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Mar 16, 2020
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Thomas Andrews Jr his stateroom A-36 was fitted out in Harland and Wolff bedroom B style and was among with A-37 the only stateroom on A-deck which was fitted out in a period style. A-37 of-course was occupied by Francis Browne (later known as father Browne) and he took 2 pictures of his stateroom. Francis Browne left the ship in Queenstown among with his pictures. The pictures are here below.



View attachment 48274
View attachment 48275
If you mirror the picture you will have the impression how A-36 looked like.

Yours sincerely,

Thomas

Mr. Krom,
Thank you very much for these pictures, I have longed to see or rather, get an idea on what Mr. Andrews Jr accommodations were while aboard the ship. These pictures give me the absolute best imagery I could hope for. Again, I can’t thank you enough for these pictures.

PS: I do have many more questions about Mr. Thomas Andrews Jr but I do not want to overwhelm you in any capacity.
 
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Thomas Krom

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Nov 22, 2017
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Glad to be at service.

If you have any questions please send a personal message so I could answer them since I got quite some spare time on my hands.

Yours sincerely,

Thomas
 
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