Ann Elizabeth Isham


cjpoulios

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Jun 10, 2016
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A very bizarre story, though a scenario more probable than the one with the woman floating in the water with her arms frozen around the dog is that Ann ignored the warnings of the young steward who told her to go up to the main deck, preferring to return to her cabin and go back to sleep. How no one remembered seeing her anywhere is a mystery, and even Mrs. Ryerson, whose husband worked for the law firm founded by Ann's father, never mentioned her as being aboard the ship. It is possible that Ann suffered from an acute case of melancholy, resenting her life as a spinster being carted between the homes of her sister in Paris and her brother in New York. Whether she harbored any sort of suicidal tendencies, and saw the sinking of the Titanic as the perfect opportunity to follow through, is something to be considered.
 

Feral Kat

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Jun 10, 2014
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It's funny. I was thinking what a terrific life she had: traveling first class from Paris to New York with great frequency. Yes, it was a time when every woman was supposed to be married, but of course not every woman was, for any number of reasons.People see things such different ways, don't they? I get the feeling she probably very much wanted to live.
 

Sut

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Sep 28, 2015
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Wouldn't Ann Isham be one of FIVE First Class females who perished? I always thought it was only four; Ida Strauss, Edith Evans, Bess Allison and daughter Lorraine.
 

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