ANNIVERSARY ROAD TRIP 9807


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Mike- I agree that Hal Burton's Morro Castle isn't the latest book but it sure was a great read and starter book for someone like me who was just becoming interested in the Morro Castle tragedy. Jim was right in that he was there and covered the disaster in 1934. He also knew all the characters from a young honeymoon couple on a cruise to gun totting guerrillas of Havana. Great Book.
 
Good evening, George:

>I hope you'll be posting a bit of your article on Morro Castle on Encyclopedia Titanica after you publish it.

The article in Voyage is in two parts, perhaps 20 pages in total. The ET article, without photos, is 58 manuscript pages which should run to between 90 and 100 pages once all the photos are placed. And this is just the beginning. After a brief "breather" we are going to wrap up part 3 of our Lusitania series, on which Mike and I have been joined by ET's Cliff Barry, and then the massive 400 page Morro Castle blockbuster for Gare Maritime will commence. Any suggestions anyone has, regarding story ideas, don't hesitate to make them! I'm always on ther lookout for new and obscure wrecks.
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Jim << Any suggestions anyone has, regarding story ideas, don't hesitate to make them! I'm always on ther lookout for new and obscure wrecks. >>

Well the most obscure ship wreck I can think of is the 1120 wreck of the Blanch Nef (Old Norman French for White Ship) off the reefs of Falaise, France in November 1120. It was the Titanic of its day. Unfortunately its so obscure that most people wouldn't be interested in it except if you were a medievalist or interested in the British monarchy. although it might have value if it was told right. I always was interested in the Blanch Nef.

There also the Collins line wreck of the Arctic in 1854 that I once read of in Junior High.
 
Well, I've been pondering Arctic and Pacific for quite some time. And from time to time wonder about the City of Glasgow~ is there enough information for a decent article? Then there is always laBourgogne and the compellingly depressing loss of the Clallam...
 
Hi Jim
Congratulations on your excellent article. I just received Voyage and as always, your writing and research skills are top notch. I can't wait to read the second half! I especially liked the passenger story about the girl who was so desperate to be liked she... well, I don't want to ruin the story.
Mike
 
Hi Jim-

Never heard of any of the ships you mentioned so writing an article on any of them sounds like a good bet to me. The obscure shipwrecks are sometimes the most interesting.
 
Hi Jim, the wreck of the Pacific passenger ship SS Valencia, which occurred on January 20, 1906 off of the southwest coast of Vancouver Island, B.C. is certainly an interesting one as far as passenger desperation and human drama is concerned. All women and children aboard lost their lives and only a few men survived. There are many wild tales surrounding the loss of this ship, some true some questionable. I don't think there has been much research into the lives of the passengers, so that would be a fresh take on the story.
 
Jason- Have you read Michael Neitzel's book about the Valencia? Not to be missed! Here is a link to some Valencia musings from the ET message board:
https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/6937/92907.html?1102378686
and, yes, given time this wreck could easily make an excellent article.

Heard of the Clara Nevada during your travels in Alaska? There lies quite a tale. She "vanished without a trace" only to be resurrected by a storm some years later and hurled ashore. So says the legend. The truth is far more compelling and, no, she didn't really rise to the surface and sail down Lynn Canal with skeletons aboard before being thrown ashore. Despite the claims of so many books...

If the mood strikes, I'd love to write about all of those stupid- but- compelling Ships and the Supernatural tales that got so heavily anthologized in the 1970s. Ouran(g?) Medan. Ivan Vassili. Iron Mountain. Clara Nevada. Octavia. Classic nightmare-fodder when one was 8, and a major source of disappointemnt to grow up and find out the true stories....
 
Silly, silly me! I should have known, Jim, you'd both discovered and written about the Valencia already. No I haven't read Neitzel's book. I was particularly intrigued by the paranormal stories (perfectly subjective of course) surrounding the Valencia wreck and that lifeboat #5 floated to shore decades later in perfectly good condition. The nameplate from the lifeboat is apparently now in the Maritime Museum of British Columbia in Victoria, B.C.

Yes, I had heard of the Clara Nevada. Boom! All gone! I thought she looked very sleek - like a private yacht really. Skagway is still a major port-of-call for both commercial and cruise ships even though the town itself is quite small and rustic.
 
So, you know of the Clara Nevada! Check out this very sad series of letters, written by a soon-to-be-victim of the disaster, and his family in the south:

http://explorenorth.com/library/weekly/aa112798.htm

and this posting, made when I was young and my heart was an open book and I used to say Live And Let Live (You know I did, You know I did)...less than two weeks after joining the message board I was already~ apparently~ rediscovering my obsession with Pop Culture... found the thread pleasantly nostalgic, and am puzzled that I once used the formal form of my name here. James A.?
https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/6937/4766.html
 
George- Sorry to seemingly talk over you!

>The obscure shipwrecks are sometimes the most interesting.

That is certainly the truth. City of Glasgow, for instance, was an early iron-hulled vessel that vanished with a huge passenger load (was it 350 or 499? Off the top of my head I cannot recall) yet for some reason she never became legendary.
(She may have been found , adrift and totally burned-out some time later) And the Utopia- a truly horrible wreck only recently "rediscovered" for the excellent book Transatlantic.

My new project, decided on earlier tonight, involves yet another liner destroyed by fire in a storm. Totally obscure,and I must now head to NYPL to see if there is enough evidence on file to warrant deeper investigation.
 
Mike:
> your writing and research skills are top notch.

I believe that the phrase we agreed upon to use in these situations was "Incomparable to the extent that the tired line 'Seemingly touched by the hand of God in the creative process' for once holds true!" Not that I am being maestro-like, and "top-notch" is certainly applicable, but an agreement is an agreement.
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"Your writing and research skills are incomparable to the extent that the tired line 'Seemingly touched by the hand of God in the creative process' for once holds true!" Please remember the line I carefully rehearsed with you, for the ET version of the article: "The fusion of Jim's text, Martin Oppenheim's research contributions, and Harald Advokaat's evocative portait of the liner at sea, results in an article of such transcendent splendor that all involved should immediately retire, for they will never surpass this!"

I jest, of course. Thanks for the kind words~ I look forward to seeing the final outcome myself. And thanks for all the help you gave, as well.

> I especially liked the passenger story about the girl who was so desperate to be liked she... well, I don't want to ruin the story.

Oh yes. Well, when it appears on ET, there is a lovely photo of the swain with whom she was smitten, on another cruise, posing on a gangplank in St. Kitts that will make a great addition to the text.
 
>I believe that the phrase we agreed upon.....<

omg....

>Well, when it appears on ET....<

I cannot wait as Mike has peaked my curiosity.

(you know YOU did, you know YOU did....)
 
>omg....

My reaction exactly! You rehearse someone, and rehearse them and rehearse them, and then they AD LIB!

For those who do not know- Mike is my research partner of 7 years. The above was a joke.
 
Jim->> George- Sorry to seemingly talk over you!<<

No worries James A.,
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. Sorry couldn't resist. Feelin' quirky tonite. Seriously though I'm so busy with my job right now that I usually can't be here to be talked over.

Jim->> That is certainly the truth. City of Glasgow, for instance, was an early iron-hulled vessel that vanished with a huge passenger load (was it 350 or 499? Off the top of my head I cannot recall) yet for some reason she never became legendary.<<

Sounds Mary Celeste like to me. I love a good mystery.

Good luck Jim on your latest project. Can't wait to know what you dig up.
 
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