Antoinette Flegenheim

Dec 7, 2000
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Martin

My areas of interest/research has shifted from passengers in recent years, and perhaps I'm showing my ignorance here, but couldn't the Titanic survivor possibly have been one of the Gibson ladies? If I remember correctly, both were in Europe at the time and had some involvement in the war.

Daniel.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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An interesting idea, Daniel, but I doubt it. As Americans, both Dorothy and Pauline Gibson would have been considered 'enemy aliens' had they had the misfortune to find themselves in wartime Berlin. Also, in spite of her earlier Fascist sympathies, Dorothy appears to have 'switched sides' by 1943 or 1944 and was herself persecuted and imprisoned by the Gestapo.

Brian's suggestion of Sigrid Lindstroem doesn't seem likely either - she was already in her mid-fifties when she sailed on the 'Titanic' and would have been elderly indeed by the time of the Second World War. She died in 1946.

None of which proves that Reck-Malleczewan DID meet Antoinette Flegenheim. But I think we can at least rule out the other candidates suggested above.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Martin

On a sidenote, I believe Mrs Flegenheim's 1912 account will soon be piblished in TIS' quarterly Voyage magazine.

Regards,

Daniel.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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I'd be very interested to read that!

Incidentally, I was pottering around on another 'Passenger Research' thread and found an excellent and illuminating contribution by Gerhard Schmidt, posted back in 2004, which reveals more about the elusive Mrs F's family background and connections. I don't seem to have much success with 'importing' links to take fellow board-members there directly but you won't need to go very far: the thread in question is entitled 'Flegenheim(er) Antoinette, nee Liche' and is filed under 'Biographical - 1st Class'.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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For those interested, the Flegenheim account was published in the current issue of TIS' Voyage. The journal has already been printed and sent earlier this week, so those who are members of the TIS should receive it shortly.

Those who are not members but are interested, and would like to join the TIS, can do so via this link:

http://www.titanicinternationalsociety.org/

Kind regards,

Daniel.
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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Hi Daniel-

Thank you for making this account available for all to see. It was an excellent contribution from you, and I'm sure every one will enjoy reading it.

Mike
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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A researcher on Ancestry.com has identified the following info on the elusive Mrs. Flegenheimer... I posted this under her bio as well. One question remains, who claimed her maiden name was Liche?

*She was born circa 1871 to Wm. Wendt and Pauline Wagner

*Her 1891 address was 135 E58 St

*She was married to Alfred Flegenheimer on November 1, 1890 in NY

*June 20, 1912 she married Paul Elliot White-Hurst in Buffalo, NY.

*Paul White-Hurst was born in Stafford, England in 1878 and in 1912 was a resident of Toronto

*Lived in Trafalgar Sq till the war when he sailed for Belgium to offer his services in the war office. According to his file, she lived at 'The Hague'.

*The presumably separated sometime during the war

*Her ex-husband re-married in 1932 ro Marion Angold and died in Wilstshire in 1964

As others searching Ancestry have found, she was still alive in Munchen, Germany in 1938
 
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Not sure if I’m too late in offering this opinion, but looking at the story of a Titanic survivor rubbing shoulders with the Nazis, this perhaps makes me think of Edith Rosenbaum / Russell.

Though Jewish, she did claim to have met Mussolini and was fluent in German, so I wouldn’t be surprised if she perhaps went ‘under the raider’ in terms of her religion. She was extremely well travelled & confident so I wouldn’t be surprised if she felt reasonably comfortable in that company.

Does anyone know any more about her movements in the 1940s?

Daniel.
 
Jul 26, 2009
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She was 48. She entered Boat 7, first lifeboat to be lowered. On April 19, 1912, the "New York Herald" reported that she had refused to comment because a written notice had gone around in her lifeboat asking those on board not to give any information about the disaster. She said she felt obliged to comply with this request.
 
Jul 22, 2004
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Since 2000, I have tried to find out more about Antoinette Flegenheimer, the only passenger from Berlin aboard "Titanic". So far, I have not reached a satisfactory conclusion as to where she came from and where she went. Maybe this article will be read by someone who can assist me in my research.

According to "Encyclopedia Titanica" she was born in May 1871 (per the 1900 census of New York City). After being rescued by "Carpathia" she told the purser she was 48 years old, which would have ment she was born in 1864. "Encyclopedia Titanica" (www.encyclopedia-titanica-org) lists her place of birth as Berlin, so I searched the archives in Berlin-Schöneberg/Tempelhof, the archives of Charlottenburg/Wilmersdorf and the state archives of Berlin. There were several Liches in Berlin at that time. The search was not easy because several formerly independent towns and villages united with Berlin in 1921, so today, the city's boundary is very different from that of earlier years and the heavy bombing during World War II caused the destruction of many archives.

It is uncertain that Antoinette was Jewish, but her husband was.

In Berlin I enquired at the Jewish Community Oranienburger Straße. Their list of graves survived the Holocaust and the bombings, but there was no trace of her.

I also enquired at the archives of the Lutheran church because her family could have been Christian. No trace was found of her or her later husband.

Antoinette married Alfred Flegenheimer about 1891. The name Flegenheimer is quite frequently found amongst Jewish families around Frankfurt-on-Main.

Alfred Flegenheimer was born in 1869 — his parents were Heinrich and Bertha nee Flesch. They are mentioned in the Frankfurt street directory from 1905 (Feuerbachstraße 31). Their son Alfred became very rich as a broker and emigrated to the U.S. in 1890. He died in 1907 in Manhattan, New York and was buried first at the Jewish Salem Fields Cemetery. His body was then shipped by his wife to Germany to be buried on February 2, 1908 at the cemetery of the Israelitic Community Frankfurt.

The Ellis Island homepage (www. ellisisland.org) shows that, in 1906, Antoinette Flegenheimer traveled from France to New York aboard "La Savoie". In 1909 the street directory of Manhattan shows she lived at 3458 Broadway.

Alfred Flegenheimer’s brother Hermann was mentioned at an exhibition of the Centrum Judaicum in Berlin (”žPioneers in Celluloid“). He had changed his name into Flegheim. His brother probably had changed his into Flegenheim.

Hermann Flegenheimer was born in Frankfurt, went to Berlin and again changed his name to Fellner (probably because it did not sound Jewish). He was one of the lesser-known film pioneers in Germany and founded a company which later was integrated into the famous UFA. When the National Socialists started their terror regime, he emigrated to London where he commited suicide in 1936. I contacted several Jewish communities without result. Again, he must not have been a member of a religious community.

In a 1912 Berlin street directory I found that Hermann Flegenheimer was listed as director of a theatre and lived in Regentenstraße 2 (now Hitzigallee - the house does not exist any more due to heavy bombings and at the site is now the "Kulturforum") and, in 1917 Bertha Flegenheimer, his mother was living there. The family must have taken up residence in Berlin. She died and was buried on November 13, 1939 in the grave of her husband in Frankfurt-on- Main.

Antoinette Flegenheim lived in Charlottenburg (today a district of Berlin) at Windscheidstraße 41 II. The house was built in 1911 and survived the war. In a 1912 Charlottenburg street directory she appears as Antoinette Flegenheim living at Windscheidstr.

When she was saved from the "Titanic" disaster in lifeboat 7, some passengers said she was from Philadelphia, yet others said she was a society lady from Manhattan. Encyclopedia Titanica writes she boarded "Titanic" in Southampton, but another source states Cherbourg. Her first-class ticket was numbered 17598, the cost of which was 31 British pound sterling, 13 shilling and 13 dimes.

On April 19, 1912, the "New York Herald" reported that she had refused to comment because a written notice had gone around in her lifeboat asking those on board not to give any information about the disaster. She said she felt obliged to comply with this request.

Antoinette Flegenheim married again to a Mr P. W. White-Hurst (or Whitehurst), probably a British subject. In the Charlottenburg phone book for 1913, I found at the former Flegenheim address the name White-Hurst (but with the initials P.E.). In 1914, this name was missing. But since the German and British Empires were now at war with each other, the foreign nationals of the respective countries had to leave. By marrying Mr White-Hurst Antoinette Flegenheim had become a foreigner.

Attempts to get information about her or her husband at several Jewish communities in London did not bring any result.

I hope there is someone in Britain or the U.S. who is able to find some trace of Antoinette Flegenheim/White-Hurst and would be glad to have the feedback to me at sgberlin"a"online.de .

Gerhard Schmidt-Grillmeier
 

Encyclopedia Titanica

Staff member
Feb 22, 2012
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Only known portrait of Titanic Survivor Antoinette Flegenheim

antoinette-flegenheim-titanic-survivor_100x100_100x75.jpg

The photograph printed in Berliner Lokalanzeiger 1912 is currently the only known image of this elusive Titanic passenger. ... Berliner Lokalanzeiger

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