ANTR review

Seumas

Seumas

Member
Is it this article?

With regards to those picked up by the Carpathia


The article I posted, warned about exerting hypothermic patients too quickly. They should be kept as still as possible because the heart is extremely vulnerable in that condition. It wouldn't surprise me if they encouraged them to row to warm up the body quickly!
That's not what happened to the four.

Sidney Siebert died shortly after being picked up by Boat No. Four and W. F. Hoyt (bleeding from the nose and mouth) died shortly after being picked up by Boat No. Fourteen.

AB William Lyons fell unconscious almost immediately after being picked up by Boat No. Four and died soon after being taken aboard the Carpathia and David Livshin appears to have been transferred unconscious from Collapsible B to Boat No. Twelve and was pronounced dead aboard the Carpathia.

I wouldn't dispute Arun's posts on survival times in freezing water, he is a retired physician and we are not.
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
Many years ago Yankee magazine had an article titled something like "You're Not Dead Until You're Warm and Dead," but I didn't see it in my old issues of Yankee and didn't find it online. As I recall it was about rescuers fishing people out of icy water: people who, because of the length of immersion, would be presumed dead, but who recovered after being warmed up.
I searched for that article and while I was not able to locate it I did find this one, which appears to be more along the lines of what you're referring to: http://www.rimed.org/rimedicaljournal/2019/02/2019-02-28-wilderness-foggle.pdf
 
E

Eric Paddon

Member
But More/Lightoller put me off right from the start. With the exception of Reach For the Sky, More's performance has never risen above mediocre - yes even in Genevieve where his artificial raucousness gets on one's nerves.
Couldn't disagree more. I've always enjoyed More as an actor. For me he was the best actor who ever brought G.K. Chesterton's Father Brown to life, and my familiarity with him from that was why I was able to latch in to ANTR on my first viewing once I recognized More. Also enjoyed him as the Ghost of Christmas Present in "Scrooge" though they sadly didn't give him one of Dickens' best lines, the mocking refrain of Scrooge's "Are there no prisons? Are there no workhouses?"
 
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Couldn't disagree more. I've always enjoyed More as an actor.
Each one is entitled to their opinion. I have seen several films with him in the lead and utterly disliked him in every one of them except Reach for the Sky. OK, he was tolerable in Northwest Frontier, but that's about that.
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
It must be a british thing. I don't think he was all that well known in the US. Not like a Lawrence Olivier, Richard Burton, Sean Connery or a Michael Caine and many other well known and popular brit actors. Not familar with those movies you guys are talking about other than ANTR. But I remember him being in "The Longest Day" and the "Battle of Britain". At least I think that was him in the Battle of Britain. I will double check that. Cheers all.
 
Last edited:
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
It must be a British thing. I don't think he was all that well known in the US
In a way it is a British thing but IMO that "thing" was over-emphasised and even exaggerated in some British films in the past, sometimes to the extent of reducung the characters to caricatures of themselves. I have lived in the UK for over 37 years and know that the British are - and have always been - as individually diverse as any other nationality, perhaps even more so. But the Britsh films of the 40s and 50s, including those from the Ealing stable, had to compete against their Hollywood counterparts and in trying to do so over-emphasised this "Britishness" to make the character and atmosphere seem 'different' to their American customers. The rather silly looking bowler-hatted, umbrella carrying, slighly comic British Toff was always rare in real-life but that's what international customers imagined most "gentlemen" like Bankers or Stockbrokers were like. Kenneth More's career coincided with the era when British filmmakers were happy to feed that sort of appetite; add that to More's rather bland looks and personality (or lack of it) and he came across as a glorified Father Brown in most of his roles.
 
P

PeterChappell

Member
Kenneth More was Group Captain Barker in Battle of Britain. He's one of my favourite actors, he was only following the script in ANTR.
 
E

Eric Paddon

Member
Enjoyed him even when his presence was small like an uncredited part in the 1951 Jimmy Stewart film "No Highway In The Sky".

The Father Brown series he did on British TV in the mid-70s. He captured the nuance and brilliance of the character without resorting to the more comical bumbling interpretations from other actors who've made their versions less enjoyable for me than I found More's episodes.
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
In a way it is a British thing but IMO that "thing" was over-emphasised and even exaggerated in some British films in the past, sometimes to the extent of reducung the characters to caricatures of themselves. I have lived in the UK for over 37 years and know that the British are - and have always been - as individually diverse as any other nationality, perhaps even more so. But the Britsh films of the 40s and 50s, including those from the Ealing stable, had to compete against their Hollywood counterparts and in trying to do so over-emphasised this "Britishness" to make the character and atmosphere seem 'different' to their American customers. The rather silly looking bowler-hatted, umbrella carrying, slighly comic British Toff was always rare in real-life but that's what international customers imagined most "gentlemen" like Bankers or Stockbrokers were like. Kenneth More's career coincided with the era when British filmmakers were happy to feed that sort of appetite; add that to More's rather bland looks and personality (or lack of it) and he came across as a glorified Father Brown in most of his roles.
Yes. I didn't mean that as a dig. I have many british produced movies on my DVR. I like their style and they were entertaining to me at least. But probably not movies many would like today. It's a generational thing I would guess. They didn't have the budget of hollywood but I don't care about that if the story is interesting. Even the Hammer studios made sci-fi movies that I liked and still watch from the 60s and 70s. Plus there were many good movies made that were joint ventures made with british and hollywood studios. Cheers all.
 
Last edited:
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
I have many british produced movies on my DVR. I like their style and they were entertaining to me at least. But probably not movies many would like today.
So do I. Some of the best films going back to 1930s were made in the UK and afterwards as well, many classics were shot here. What I was referring to is the "popular" image of the Brits that other countries had during the post-war period, say 10-12 years and the films that fed that expectation.

There are some really good lesser known British films like State Secret, Green for Danger, Non-Stop New York etc.
 
Top