Any votes for the most facinating accounts of interior flooding


Sep 1, 2004
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I remember that when Carl Johnson (third class) jumped out of his bed, the water spilled over his foots and when Daniel Buckley jumped out of his bed, the were already few centimeters of water in his cabin.

And also two first class passengers, Norman C. Chambers with his wife. They were standing on the F-Deck by the entrance to the mail room and the baggage room. He looked into the both rooms and even that there was water and the mail workers were wet, he and his wife were joking about and the did not believe that the Titanic is sinking.
 
M

Matthew Bird

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I've seen a good painting of passengers ascending the Grand Staircase, shortly after 1 AM and looking down and seeing water on E-Deck.

Do any survivor accounts mention this?
 
It is Ken Marshall painting. I do not recall anybody talking about it in the Inquiry, but it surely mus have happened, since the water had to flood E deck in order pass over the bulkhead located one deck below and then go down (by the stairs) to reach the nexy watertight compartment. However, the serious level of flooding, such as the despicted by the painting, would not have occurred at 1 am because the water would have drained to the lower parts of the ship. This could have happened once the boiler room nº4 and the section of the F deck located immidiately above were flooded.
 

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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Doesn't stand to reason that if water were flowing over F deck then down, that F deck at that point would be flooded in some capacity until the ship foundered.

And of course the amount of flooding on f deck while cascading over the bulkhead then down below would be determined by the volume of water and the size of the appeture through which the water flowed? This calculation is beyond me, but think of filling a giant pool with a million gallons of water. Now imagine this pool drains into another pool underneath it through a drain the size of the sink drain.

Would all the water drain at once? Now imagine both pools are a contained system filled with seawater at a thousand gallons a minute. This will cause the upper pool to flood as the volume of its intake would fill faster than it could drain. Eventually both pools will fill completely, the top feeding the bottom, but it would n
 

Scott Mills

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It would not ever appear, except at th beginning of the process that the upper pool was not flooded.

Finally imagine the same arangement, in which 1000 gallons per minute were poured to pool one, which drained into the second pool at the same rate. There would still be a tremendous amount of water present in the first pool flowing into the second regardless of whether the water would seem to "fill" the whole pool in process.

Now how much this analogy matches titanic, I do not know.
 

Jay Roches

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Apr 14, 2012
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I've seen the painting you're talking about, but I can't recall exactly what it's like...

Referring to the plans at Discovery Channel :: Titanic (which are Bruce Beveridge's plans, and have excellent detail), the place on E deck we are talking about is abaft of watertight bulkhead "F". The grand staircase stops being grand at D deck, at the reception/dining saloon area, but it goes down to F deck (to the Turkish baths and swimming pool). On F deck there is a door in WTB Bulkhead "F" forward of the staircase and abaft of the swimming pool. For reference, Boiler Room No. 5 is below the pool, forward of WTB "F", and Boiler Room No. 4 is below the Grand Staircase.

It's interesting to note that WTB "E" -- the one forward of the swimming pool -- is the first one going aft that does *not* have a stairway down to G deck. The squash racket court, mail room, and the holds are all forward of WTB "E", as is BR 6. In those sections, there must have been some way for water to get down, but not a big and easy way like a stairwell. So the pool-on-top-of-a-pool analogy probably did apply to a certain extent to compartments where there was no large passage through F deck. That applies to the compartments containing the engines and boiler rooms 1 through 5, but not 6.

Back to the painting -- what was happening is that water was coming through Scotland Road and the 1st class passage past WTB "E", after it filled up BR 6. It then flooded the space on F deck between bulkheads E and F, and then reached the Grand Staircase on E deck, filled the Turkish Baths on F deck. Exactly how the flooding of BR 5 and 4 play into this I'm not sure, but BR 5 was almost certainly full by the time water got to the Grand Staircase. That's because the progress of the water is related to how much water, in total, is present on the ship and where the waterline is. BR 5 did flood around 1 am, so that is a likely time for water to be going aft on E deck's passageways past WTB F to find its way down to F deck via the major vertical opening in that compartment -- the grand staircase.
 

Jay Roches

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Apr 14, 2012
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Addition: These events are described in the account of 2nd class steward Joseph Wheat, whose quarters were on F deck near the Turkish bath. He describes a "stream, more than a trickle" of water coming down the Staircase In Question at "quarter to or ten to one", and says there was about an inch of water on F deck at the time, enough to cover the heels of his boots. Wheat also has quite an adventure forward of his quarters and visits the mail room and squash court. He also took it upon himself to close the watertight doors near the Turkish baths, which I think extended the life of the Titanic by at least a couple of minutes.
 

yntatny

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Sep 6, 2014
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Does anyone know a general area of where the water line would have been when the lights went out at 2:18 in the area of C-61/63?
 

TimTurner

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Dec 11, 2012
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How accurate do you want to be. I'd guess they were probably under water, but you'd probably want eyewitness accounts to be sure.
 

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