Any young men on this forum


Kevin Tischer

Member
Dec 24, 2011
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I'm 21 and have always had a fascination with Titanic ever since I read a kids book about it when I was 6. It's one of the first books I remember reading. Are there any other guys that age on here?

[Moderator's note: This post, originally posted in an unrelated topic, has been moved to here. JDT]
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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I think there's a few of the younger generation around here as well, Kevin......i'm 22 but that's starting to feel quite old!!

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Jan 27, 2011
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Not as quite young as you gentlmen are, but I'm 28. Seems as though once you hit 30 it all goes down hill. Speaking of reading Titanic books at a young age, I remember seeing Robert Ballard's Exploring the Titanic on a book rack at the school library back in 3rd grade. Will never forget that as long as I live, and have been fascinated with the Titanic ever since.
 
Mar 12, 2011
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I'm 25. There's a few of us lurking around here =)

>Can't help you guys. I'm 52, and I have the trashed kneecaps to prove it!<

Already with you there, Michael =/
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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I think JC's Titanic and the hype that surrounded it in the late 90's was probably at least part of the catalyst for a lot of the younger generation of Titanic enthusiasts....I still have it on VHS tape. ;-)

Michael, growing old disgracefully?

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Mar 12, 2011
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I honestly didn't enjoy Cameron's Titanic that much when I was younger, I can appreciate it for what it is now, but the cheesy fictitious love story made me squirm initially!

>Michael, growing old disgracefully? < Which Michael? =P

I've got a decade in the restaurant business under my belt, and a family history of knee problems. The two are a toxic combination, unfortunately!
 

Kevin Tischer

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Dec 24, 2011
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Agreed, I was a big titanic fan before JC's movie but once it came out, I think I was in 3rd grade, EVERYONE in my class had seen it and we would act out the ship striking the iceberg scene on the playground everyday. lol kinda funny to think about it now actually. I remember I would stand at the top of the jungle gym and pretend to be Murdoch or Lightoller lowering the lifeboats. Flapping my arms about and yelling to "lower away evenly, lads!" "left and right together" and what not. lol good times. I think this continued until I was in 5th grade and then the kids got into star wars episode I and Titanic was forgotten. Then it went from sinking ships to lightsaber duels.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Michael, growing old disgracefully? <<

I wish! if you gotta get old and creaky, wine, women and song is the way to go about it. Instead, I got it by strutting around on the decks of our warships! (Kneecaps vs Class B nickle-steel armour plate. Guess which wins out!)
 
Jan 28, 2003
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What on earth's the matter with you lot? Feeling old at 22, all downhill from 30, trashed kneecaps at 25? Or even at 52 seems a bit young to me, but maybe warship decks are a particular hazard, I don't know. I suppose if the deck is rising when you put your foot down, it could be a bit traumatic. Pavements are hard, but at least they keep still.

The human body, I read, is designed to deliver trouble-free service up to about age 35-40, so you kids are nurturing hypochondria and/or neurosis if you really think it's already going downhill. After 45, it's reported, people start noticing that getting out of bed in the morning isn't the leaping start to the day it used to be, and they often say "Aaaaah" when they sit down or "Oooofff" when they get up again. I always make a point of performing these actions silently, though that probably doesn't fool anyone, but then I'm over 60. After 50, research suggests, people think about their own death about once a day. This leaps to about 3 times a day at 60. After 85, you hear about the death of others and merely chuckle, even if you liked them and are very sorry, because you're still here.

In my experience of knees, it's never going up that is the problem, whether a slope or stairs; it's going down. And in the words of my cheerful GP, if you want to live to be a drooling, incontinent, idiotic 90-year-old nuisance, don't smoke or drink, take moderate exercise, and eat up your vegetables. If you'd rather avoid this almost inevitable scenario, and spare your children, then just have a good (albeit shorter) time.
 
Mar 12, 2011
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Other than my knees, I'm in the best shape of my life! =P Mostly because after working in fine dining, I can't stomache fast food anymore and don't pump my body full of garbage. Unfortunately though, I've inherited a family history of arthritis at a young age. Do I suffer from Hypochondria? Doubtful. Neurosis...well I can't argue with you there!
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Ho! You're all still hoping to live forever, one way or another. That's not going to happen. But, good luck anyway, no matter how decrepit you will inevitably become.

The conundrum of long life versus real,joyous life has preoccupied thinkers over the millenia. The age at which senility might strike has slightly moved upwards, but it hasn't changed very substantially. No matter how fit you are, you'll go potty in the end. Not good.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>The human body, I read, is designed to deliver trouble-free service up to about age 35-40,

And, until after WW2, you were intended to die at 52-56 years old, giving you smooth running for 3/4 of your life. People, of course, did live beyond that age, but the rank and file could expect to die in their early to mid 50s, with good knees. What we now views as the ANNOYANCES of being 55 are the things that, if nature took its course, would kill us.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Evening, Jim. Just draining the glass and stubbing out the fag .... as you'd expect.

They found a crypt in London some years ago under a bombed-out church site, with coffins and bodies just chucked in any old how, with no respect - from the 18thC, I think. Oddly, but because it was a rich neighbourhood, a lot of them proved to be very old - in their 80s and 90s. But their disposal doesn't suggest they were much missed ... I expect they had outlived their descendants' patience. Everyone else then, as you say, died decently at a younger age.

Oh, well ...
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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Monica is right about the human body but that doesn't always make allowances for accidents outside the norm of the human body or a thorough lack of fitness.

I played just about every sport possible during school, and I still do play a fair bit of sport but not as frequently or with as much intensity - played 4 sets of tennis yesterday and I literally can barely walk today.

Likewise, my left knee also gives me a lot of grief from time to time but that's due to an unfortunate motorbike accident probably about 12 years ago.

However it is largely true that age is simply a state of mind, I have huge amounts of respect for people who are still willing to get out and have a go at competitive pursuits into their 40's, 50's and beyond, rather than be conformist and retire at 35.

The short of it is that it's clearly best to be as fit as possible and make as much of that as possible while you're still young.

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>but maybe warship decks are a particular hazard, I don't know.<<

I do. 3" thick class B nickle steel armour plate vs kneecaps.

Kneecaps lose!

An additional 12 years waltzing around on concrete floors is no improvement.
 
Mar 12, 2011
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>Monica is right about the human body but that doesn't always make allowances for accidents outside the norm of the human body or a thorough lack of fitness. <

Agreed. I was in a car wreck a few years ago and messed my back up pretty good. No matter what kind of therapy you go through you're never the same afterwards. Losing weight definitely helps though! I don't understand how someone can be 75-100lbs overweight and complain about back problems. You'd think it'd be obvious they can do at least SOMETHING about it. I kind of landed in the shallow end of the gene pool as far as joint problems go anyway, but when I started dropping the pounds I felt a lot better. I figure it's a lot easier to change my habits now while I'm still young and not set in my ways!

> I have huge amounts of respect for people who are still willing to get out and have a go at competitive pursuits into their 40's, 50's and beyond, rather than be conformist and retire at 35. <

Me too Adam. We have a guy at work that we affectionately refer to as the "Old (insert expletive here)". He's in his early 60s, a pretty advanced age for a field where most people burn out in their mid to late 40s. He's former navy, black belt in Tae Kwan Do (and competed til recently) and could probably still stomp any two of us on his own. He's probably in the best shape out of all of us!

I was never athletic, and I used to be a fiend for fast food and junk food. A job where I have to be on the move my entire shift and where I was forced to learn about GOOD food was a godsend, although I'd probably drop another 30lbs if I could quit drinking so much soda.

Like you said, age is as much a state of mind as it is anything else, I refuse to grow up any more than I absolutely have to!
 
May 3, 2005
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Here is one from an ancient poster on this forum. I suppose I haven't grown up either as far as "Titanic" is concerned.

My first interest was in the 1953 version of "Titanic" - the one with Clifton Webb, Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Wagner - who was about the same age as I at the time. LOL. Saw it on the big screen while on Liberty in San Diego. Afraid I can't even begin to match up with Michael Standart's Sea Duty though. My Sea Duty was a bit tame in comparison. I did do a bit of walking on steel decks in the USN and concrete floors in the FAA. But no knee cap problems - yet. (Knock on wood.)

However, I always enjoy both the 1953 "Titanic", 1958 "A Night To Remember" and the 1997 "Titanic" versions. You can always "fast forward" past "Jack" and "Rose." I have DVD's on all of them and they look even better on my new HDTV.

IMHO Audrey Dalton was a lot better looking than Kate Winslet. LOL.
 

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