Any young men on this forum

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Kevin Tischer

Member
I'm 21 and have always had a fascination with Titanic ever since I read a kids book about it when I was 6. It's one of the first books I remember reading. Are there any other guys that age on here?

[Moderator's note: This post, originally posted in an unrelated topic, has been moved to here. JDT]
 
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Adam Went

Member
I think there's a few of the younger generation around here as well, Kevin......i'm 22 but that's starting to feel quite old!!

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Michael McGuffin

Michael McGuffin

Member
Not as quite young as you gentlmen are, but I'm 28. Seems as though once you hit 30 it all goes down hill. Speaking of reading Titanic books at a young age, I remember seeing Robert Ballard's Exploring the Titanic on a book rack at the school library back in 3rd grade. Will never forget that as long as I live, and have been fascinated with the Titanic ever since.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Can't help you guys. I'm 52, and I have the trashed kneecaps to prove it!
 
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Michael Kestner

Member
I'm 25. There's a few of us lurking around here =)

>Can't help you guys. I'm 52, and I have the trashed kneecaps to prove it!<

Already with you there, Michael =/
 
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Adam Went

Member
I think JC's Titanic and the hype that surrounded it in the late 90's was probably at least part of the catalyst for a lot of the younger generation of Titanic enthusiasts....I still have it on VHS tape. ;-)

Michael, growing old disgracefully?

Cheers,
Adam.
 
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Michael Kestner

Member
I honestly didn't enjoy Cameron's Titanic that much when I was younger, I can appreciate it for what it is now, but the cheesy fictitious love story made me squirm initially!

>Michael, growing old disgracefully? < Which Michael? =P

I've got a decade in the restaurant business under my belt, and a family history of knee problems. The two are a toxic combination, unfortunately!
 
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Kevin Tischer

Member
Agreed, I was a big titanic fan before JC's movie but once it came out, I think I was in 3rd grade, EVERYONE in my class had seen it and we would act out the ship striking the iceberg scene on the playground everyday. lol kinda funny to think about it now actually. I remember I would stand at the top of the jungle gym and pretend to be Murdoch or Lightoller lowering the lifeboats. Flapping my arms about and yelling to "lower away evenly, lads!" "left and right together" and what not. lol good times. I think this continued until I was in 5th grade and then the kids got into star wars episode I and Titanic was forgotten. Then it went from sinking ships to lightsaber duels.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>Michael, growing old disgracefully? <<

I wish! if you gotta get old and creaky, wine, women and song is the way to go about it. Instead, I got it by strutting around on the decks of our warships! (Kneecaps vs Class B nickle-steel armour plate. Guess which wins out!)
 
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monica e. hall

Member
What on earth's the matter with you lot? Feeling old at 22, all downhill from 30, trashed kneecaps at 25? Or even at 52 seems a bit young to me, but maybe warship decks are a particular hazard, I don't know. I suppose if the deck is rising when you put your foot down, it could be a bit traumatic. Pavements are hard, but at least they keep still.

The human body, I read, is designed to deliver trouble-free service up to about age 35-40, so you kids are nurturing hypochondria and/or neurosis if you really think it's already going downhill. After 45, it's reported, people start noticing that getting out of bed in the morning isn't the leaping start to the day it used to be, and they often say "Aaaaah" when they sit down or "Oooofff" when they get up again. I always make a point of performing these actions silently, though that probably doesn't fool anyone, but then I'm over 60. After 50, research suggests, people think about their own death about once a day. This leaps to about 3 times a day at 60. After 85, you hear about the death of others and merely chuckle, even if you liked them and are very sorry, because you're still here.

In my experience of knees, it's never going up that is the problem, whether a slope or stairs; it's going down. And in the words of my cheerful GP, if you want to live to be a drooling, incontinent, idiotic 90-year-old nuisance, don't smoke or drink, take moderate exercise, and eat up your vegetables. If you'd rather avoid this almost inevitable scenario, and spare your children, then just have a good (albeit shorter) time.
 
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Michael Kestner

Member
Other than my knees, I'm in the best shape of my life! =P Mostly because after working in fine dining, I can't stomache fast food anymore and don't pump my body full of garbage. Unfortunately though, I've inherited a family history of arthritis at a young age. Do I suffer from Hypochondria? Doubtful. Neurosis...well I can't argue with you there!
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
I'm 35, going on 36 in just over two months. Fortunately, my health has been excellent so far; knock on wood.
 
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monica e. hall

Member
Ho! You're all still hoping to live forever, one way or another. That's not going to happen. But, good luck anyway, no matter how decrepit you will inevitably become.

The conundrum of long life versus real,joyous life has preoccupied thinkers over the millenia. The age at which senility might strike has slightly moved upwards, but it hasn't changed very substantially. No matter how fit you are, you'll go potty in the end. Not good.
 
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Jim Kalafus

Member
>The human body, I read, is designed to deliver trouble-free service up to about age 35-40,

And, until after WW2, you were intended to die at 52-56 years old, giving you smooth running for 3/4 of your life. People, of course, did live beyond that age, but the rank and file could expect to die in their early to mid 50s, with good knees. What we now views as the ANNOYANCES of being 55 are the things that, if nature took its course, would kill us.
 
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