Anyone Else Feel Connected to a passenger


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Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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South Florida
Welcome Jill. If you're interested in "Molly" Brown, then the first thing you should know is that she was never known as "Molly" Brown. Her name is Margaret Tobin Brown, or Mrs. JJ Brown, but never Molly. Molly was invented by Broadway producer Meredith Willson for a musical loosely - and I emphasize LOOSELY - based on her life.

I refer you to her biography. May I also suggest reading about Ruth Becker and the Countess of Rothes, and other fine ladies? I'm sure others have great suggestions also. We all have our personal favorites.

Cordially,
Kyrila
(who portrays Margaret Brown on a regular basis at local events.)
 
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Janine Zettl

Guest
Hi! I'm a 14 year old girl and I absolutely love Titanic, I'm fascinated of it and also very related. To the question if we're also connected with a passenger: Yes I am, especially with Miriam Joan Hart and Eleanor Ileen Johnson.

Bye,sincerely Janine
 
Nov 29, 2003
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Miss Lucile Polk Carter
Master William Thornton II Carter
Master John Borland Jr. Thayer ("Jack")
Miss Emily Borie Ryerson
Master John Borie Ryerson ("Jack")

I've always seemed to feel a connection with all of them. Maybe it's because I've always studied them the most, or because they're all around my age, I'm not sure. But I just feel like now i know them.
Jess
 
Dec 9, 2004
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I've always felt a connection to the steerage passengers---particularly the Irish, because my grandmother sailed from Ireland to America quite close to that time. She experienced the crowded conditions, the sense of camaraderie, the excitement of a promising voyage. Hearing her describe it would fuel my interest in the fates of those who had hoped for better lives.
 

Allison Stec

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Dec 9, 2004
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I did a presentation in college on a few Titanic children and I've always been interested in the Allison family story (and not just because their last name is my first!)
 
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Harriet Collingham

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Heh, another familiar face (Hi Jill!)
I have an interest in the Officers, especially Harold Lowe and James Moody. They're one of the reasons I thought of going to sea as an Officer myself
happy.gif
 

Nina Darcy

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Dec 30, 2004
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For me, I would consider Mr. Andrews and 2nd Officer Lightoller childhood heros. Like you, Harriet, I've wished to go to sea and become an officer, and am still looking into it. I've also considered architecture, looking up to Andrews and his ambitious aspirations. I am sure that everyone on board was required to show significant personal courage in the face of the tragedy, but the two above-mentioned men tend to draw me the most, when researching the many displays of outstanding bravery onboard and off that night.
 
Jan 18, 2005
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Hi guys,
I've always felt a very strong connection with the ship as an 'entity', i.e. passengers and vessel as one, and when I was 13 years of age I was absolutely obsessed with those 4 mighty smokestacks! But, being a Titanomaniac as you all, I read many stories, saw many TV-programmes, and gradually, as I got more information, the individual stories of passengers made a great impression on me. I never dreamt of being on the T myself, but when I visited the recovered artefacts- exhibition in London I had a remarkable experience. One of the last items shown was a great big wrench, hung on the wall and not encased, and I stood in front of it and couldn't touch it. It felt to me at the time that this item held 'concentrated emotion', or a vibration with the fact that it had been at that place, at that time. In a way the Titanic became more real to me, and since then I have asked myself many times; 'what would I have done in that situation?' So, in a way, I feel the interests one has with different aspects of the disaster change through time, also depending on ones own experiences and personal development.
 

Eyren Mills

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Mar 17, 2005
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Edith Corse Evans. It's weird just events/coincidences over my lifetime, things keep coming up. I've never been "into" the Titanic. I'll be interested to learn more and see her picture when finally published.
 

Ted Robinson

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Apr 8, 2005
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Hi all...

I'm a newbie to this forum. I have come into possession of a lot of memorabilia including a pile (about 60) of love letters from William Gwinn (one of the Sea Postal Clerks lost on Titanic) to his wife Florence. The letters begin with their meeting in 1904, and continue for many years. They chronicle their courtship, marriage and birth of their 2 children. Also I have several photos of what I take to be them and their family members. There is also an official letter from the Commerce Dept. awarding Florence $2,000 for the loss of Will’s life while on duty aboard Titanic.I have tried unsuccessfully to find surviving kin to whom I can return the material, but no luck so far. I know that their son, William Thurston Gwynne (note spelling change) was born 4/18/09, and died 9/20/96. I believe that he never married and thus had no heirs. There was also a daughter, born only months before Will died, but I don't know her name. Anybody out there have an interest or can enlighten me?? I'm thankful for all correspondence.
 

Matt Simons

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Mar 12, 2005
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I have been long interested in Benjamin Guggenheim. I know alot about him, and gave some thought to being an editor for his passenger page, but I don't know what to do and no one else is an editor on that page.
 
Apr 14, 2005
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I've always considered Ruth Becker to be my favorite passenger. I'm not sure why. I loved hearing her speak about her experiences on the ship on various documentaries.
 

Julie Dowen

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May 12, 2004
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Because I am from Worcester, MA- and their neighborhoods - I have always felt for the Asplunds and Walter Porter (third and first class respectively). I find the parallels and the differences between the men, specifically, and the families fascinating and I like being able to imagine life at the turn of the century, in Worcester, when they would have been in it, the same as my family. In Worcester, an old manufacturing city, we are fortunate to have a pretty good preservation level in regards to old buildings. You could still drive from Walter Porter's last home to his shoe last manufacturing company (both still in existence) and get a good feel of his world as he lived in it. Downtown has alot of buildings built prior to 1912. Also, he wasn't born into wealth, his father created it- Walter worked hard at expanding it. His father moved and married alot but the home that they eventually settled in on King St., is so cute and homey. That neighborhood (Main South) was working class -now its a poverty stricken, drug infested section of Worcester. (If you visit, lock the doors and roll up the windows - don't stop for anyone!! Use extreme caution when photographing!) Although the house has been kept up and is a jewel in the abyss. (I will be posting photos of it soon- so as to save you the trip!). You can imagine the wonderful memories that Walter must have had as a young man with his father still using a horse and carriage although the family had an automobile and the excitement of that era of life.
The same is true for the Asplund family, as they had resided in Worcester prior to returning to Sweden to care for Mr. Asplund's mother.

I think about their bodies arriving at Union Station - which has been restored to its previous glory -and again observing the seperation of classes and again observing the paralell manner of their gallant deaths. They (Mr. Porter and Mr. Asplund) may have been labeled in seperate classes upon their arrival on the Titanic, but they both died as equal gentlemen.
 
Jul 9, 2002
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I have mentioned it before on another thread, but this seems to be the perfect place to put it...I have always felt a connection to 3rd Class Passenger Patrick Ryan. (Thus the screen name!) Being that he was Irish and my Family is Irish..from the same county in fact! Also, my first and middle names are Ryan Patrick, he was 3rd class, I have been interested in Titanic since I was 3 years old. The list goes on and on. A special man I'm sure, too bad for him and all the others who never completed their voyage.
 
May 27, 2007
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Rhoda Abbott because of my mom read about her in Her Name Titanic and me and my brother were about the same ages as her two sons Rossmore and Eugene Abbott at the time (1986). Of course later I found out they were a bit older but it really does not make any difference my mom said she'd still not leave us.
Frank Goldsmith having to say good bye to his father.
All the Swedes and Danes on board that my mom's ancestry right there. That could be my moms family in that situation. Luckily for us they all came over in the late 19th century.
 
May 1, 2004
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I'm interested in several passengers: Arthur G. Peuchen, because he was and I am a Torontonian, and because he climbed down that rope (I never would have had the gumption), Mr. Kasperian though I never type his name right,because my father said he worked with him at the plant in St. Catharines, Mrs. Margaret Tobin Brown (what I would give to float over Boat no. 6 and know what really went on there.) Ruth Becker (I thought she was quite a brave and composed girl when I read of her in "A Night to Remember". When I saw her in the A & E video, I was glued to the set.)

But I feel most connected to Annie Funk. We're both single women, both Mennonites. We may have had similar interests, may have become friends. If I had been on board, I would have been either in 2nd class, like she was, or in third. She was special, going to India on mission work, and she may have been selfless enough to stay behind and let the other ladies go.
 
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