Anyone got an extra $50000000


Status
Not open for further replies.

Diane Ostrow

Member
May 19, 2001
148
1
183
Brandnew to Ebay an actual Titanic menu signed by Edwina McKenzie! Just saw this today and almost fell over at the price! What's your opinion? I'd love to hear your input! Do you think it's really from the Titanic? Why or why not?
Starting bid is $50,000.00 and buy it now for $500,000.00!
Diane
 
Apr 7, 2001
1,052
6
233
Someone post the link, I'm too lazy to go to eBay to search for this ridiculously priced item. Yeah Kyrila it probably is the same crazy lady who posted the other item.

Teri
 

Dan Cherry

Member
Dec 14, 1999
775
9
263
Diane,
of course, when it comes to anything original Titanic, it's always caveat emptor.
Even if it is original and the signature's authentic (it *looks* like Edwina's autograph), $50,000 and buy now for $1/2 million is too rich for my blood...
 
Apr 7, 2001
1,052
6
233
Kyrila,

Ah gawd, I laughed at your post. Different idiot, good descriptive of someone uneducated in Titanic memorabilia...

Thanks for sending humor my way on this dreary morning of mucous.

Teri
 

Kyrila Scully

Member
Apr 15, 2001
2,079
35
243
South Florida
So, if I autograph my book when it's published, maybe I can get $50,000? Seriously, though, what do you think it would be worth to offer a copy autographed? It's called "Women and Children First: A Titanic Survivors' Manifest" and will have color pictures and an original art cover by Nick Barnett.
 

Dan Cherry

Member
Dec 14, 1999
775
9
263
Kyrila,
you can charge whatever you want!
proud.gif


It is always a nice option to offer autographed copies. I usually send a small batch of autographed copies of my books off to whoever is selling them at any given time. I have found that people enjoy even a personalized message if they hear of a book signing and want it addressed to a certain someone.
An autograph by a non-world-renowned author doesn't really increase the actual value, but the sentimental value to the recipient goes up a few notches...
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,662
872
563
Easley South Carolina
If I ever get my hands on $500,000 you can be sure I'll sock it away in a 401k or something equally useful after I take care of the bloody taxes. Well, that and buy a new car. My Datsun is 20 years old and running fine, but spare parts are getting hard to come by.

BTW, not surprisingly, as of this posting, there were no bidders on this little knick knack.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Diane Ostrow

Member
May 19, 2001
148
1
183
Okay, so you all had the same thoughts I did! But, do you think it is an original? If it were original what would it be worth? I'm new and not real "up" on the price of authentic Titanic memorabilia (If there really is any such thing). I know there was lap blanket that was going for tens of thousands which was taken off the Titanic or something like that.
You're right Kyrila, "different hamster on a different wheel"
happy.gif
When does your book come out Kyrila? I would buy an autographed copy to add to my meager Titanic collection!
Dan, thanks for posting the link, I had no idea how to do it! What books have you written? Remember I'm new so forgive any idiocy in asking!
happy.gif

Teri~ sorry you're having a mucous problem! Hope you feel tons better soon!
Michael~ Your posts always put me back to the heart of the matter! Thanks! What are your suspicions? Will it end like the $52,000.00 book?
Ahoy,
Diane
 
Apr 7, 2001
1,052
6
233
Kyrila,

Yeah, charge whatever you want Kyrila!

My own thought on the matter of valued books would be if I was writing a book, (and I probably am) how much value would the book incur later on in the history of man. This is somehow a very important aspect of book writing for me personally. I realize that we can't tell what would be popular later on and what would not, but it definitely is a point worth pondering. For instance, look at the value of Wilton J. Oldham's book. It's 40 years later and worth a bloody fortune! (I make a small interesting point that the book was written the year I was born) So you see, books oftentimes gain value later, if not at present. I get excited thinking that my book could possibly hold that much value later in life. I realize that for some, having a book be worth a fortune later in life would hold no contention for their writing one now, but I am saying that for ME personally, this IS a contention.

I understand Kyrila, that you'd like your book to be popular, and I assure you it will, but what are your thoughts on future value? I am wondering, please let me know.

Teri
 

Kyrila Scully

Member
Apr 15, 2001
2,079
35
243
South Florida
Teri,
Unfortunately, professional writers are not in control of future values and it is a waste of time worrying about it. In other words, authors do not reap from sales of used books after the initial sale. We do well to get what we can from the publishing houses, which is about $2,000 per book, unless we have a good agent or a good track record in sales. Writers can't get rich unless they become Danielle Steele or Stephen King or John Grisham, et al. Self-publishing is an alternative to conventional publishing, and you can make all the profits on your book, but you also have to do all the work, i.e. publicity, etc. So all of that comes out of pocket, not to mention printing costs. My little book will cost $5000 to print 1,000 copies, so I was thinking of offering pre-orders of autographed copies at $50 each, hoping to sell the requisite 100 copies to cover the printing costs. This does not include the royalties I will have to pay to the cover artist or anyone else who feels I need to fork over cash. I suggest you join a local writer's critique group to learn the ropes about writing for profit and the ins and outs of publishing and self-publishing. I belong to a couple of groups myself and it's lots of fun besides being informative. In fact, I'm hosting a seminar on how to write historicals next month and will display my Titanic collection. Hope to take pictures to share. If I could just learn how to download them on the website!
Kyrila
 

Kyrila Scully

Member
Apr 15, 2001
2,079
35
243
South Florida
Diane,
I wouldn't spend more than $20 on most of the stuff on e-Bay. Lots of stuff you can get a lot cheaper elsewhere. (How do you think they're getting it? Other websites!) For instance, one person is currently offering a sapphire ring that is a replica of the one found in the debris field for $49 opening bid. I happen to know you can get the same ring at www.emerch.com for half that price. Maybe even less than that! So be careful, watch the bids because you'll see the same items all the time and you can get bargains if you're patient. I got an entire 5-pc set of the ala carte dishes by J. Peterman for $75. They're usually twice that amount for one dish alone!

Kyrila
 

Diane Ostrow

Member
May 19, 2001
148
1
183
Kyrila~
I was also lucky enough to get 2 sets of the Peterman china for $75.00 each! I agree, there are rip offs, but I have seen bargains as well. Mostly I look for things that despite all my web searching I haven't been able to find elsewhere, especially old books! I have bought some from used bookstores, but many of the used bookstores really skyrocket the prices (Not the man in black's of course!).
My question is~ Do you think the menu is real? And if it was, what would be it's value?
And, when does your book come out?
Ahoy,
Diane
 

Kyrila Scully

Member
Apr 15, 2001
2,079
35
243
South Florida
I don't have any illusions about the menu being an original 1912-brought-off-the-ship copy. I suspect it's a reproduction that someone got signed at a THS convention. I am not aware that more than one copy exists of one of each menu from each of the three classes. I could be very wrong, but the key is that I'm not aware of any others that survived.
As for my own book, I'm not sure when it will be released. If I find a publisher, it could take forever. I am planning to self-publish but will have to sell advance orders to cover the $5,000. initial costs, not including the royalties due the artist who is painting the cover, or fees to the website for promoting it. I need to finish editing, rechecking my facts and sources before I can put it to bed. You're welcome to e-mail me for further information (or anyone else for that matter) at my e-mail address in my profile.
Kyrila
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,662
872
563
Easley South Carolina
Diane, I'm inclined to agree with Kyrila on this one. Titanic memorabilia is real enough, and the real McCoys tend to be quite valuable. A fact that fakers and frauds are very aware of. Fake menus autographed and otherwise, are as thick as fleas which is why I wouldn't buy one no matter what gaurantees were offered. An issue of The Titanic Commutator had an interesting artical on this very problem last year.

Chalk it up to the skeptic in me, but if I don't know the provinance and source of the trinket in question, and cannot find out for myself, I don't believe it!

Besides, all that menu could really offer me is information I already have in "The Last Dinner on the Titanic" which I got from Amazon.com for about $20.00

The book for my perposes is a much better buy, and even has recipes if I want to try and cook some of that stuff.

Collectors of course are of the conterary opinion. To them, all I can say is; "Let the buyer beware!"

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Apr 7, 2001
1,052
6
233
Kyrila,

You have me all wrong. I am not interested in writing for profit nor am I interested in reaping huge rewards from a book. My intention is to get the information written and published for later reference, long after I am gone. The disclaimer on my site does state this. Also, it would be exciting if the book became popular at a later date and became a historical sentimental piece of work as well. That would be more exciting to me than reaping any dollar amount. It's unfortunate but I would never find out the value of my book later, as I would be long gone. Oh well, speculate speculate.

Becoming another Danielle Steele doesn't include my list of endeavors either, although if it happened by chance I wouldn't fight the matter. But I would hope to write only of Titanic matters.

And finally, maybe I could assist you in downloading the pictures to a website. Let me know the details of your problem okay.

Sincerely,

Teri
 

Diane Ostrow

Member
May 19, 2001
148
1
183
Kyrila & Michael~
Thanks guys! Being a "new" Titanic collector presents many opportunities to be taken I'm afraid! Not that I have $50,000.00 to spend on this menu, but it provides a source of learning for me! I didn't know there was only one surviving copy of each menu! I have "Last Dinner on the Titanic" and I just love the book! There's so much information in it! I am in the midst of planning a Titanic Dinner to be served on Thanksgiving at my house for my family. Although it's not a "traditional" time to have it I thought it the perfect time for a moment of silence and a rememberance of those brave souls who endured the tragedy. I have slowly been collecting china, crystal, linen, music and silver for the occasion (since I want it to be as realistic as possible) and the Last Dinner book has provided invaluable info to help me!
I have much to learn about this Grand Lady and the circumstances behind her creation and demise. But, with all your help and my first attempts at research I am learning!
Thanks again so very much for sharing your knowledge and insight with me, it will no doubt save me a lot of heartache and foolish spending~
happy.gif

Ahoy,
Diane
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads