Anyone read this book Titanic by Peter Thresh

  • Thread starter Cornelius Thiessen
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Cornelius Thiessen

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Has anyone read "Titanic" by Peter Thresh? If so what did you make of it? I cannot believe he listed Mrs Ismay as a survivor
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Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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I've not read the book, but the error is understandable. When Ismay returned to England, his wife joined him at Queenstown and disembarked with him at Liverpool. This was photographed by the press.
 
Jun 20, 2004
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I've got it. Very accurate, isn't it?
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It also says Titanic struck the iceberg at 11:45pm, not 11:40pm. Apart from those little mistakes(is there anymore anybody's picked up on? I haven't read it right through yet), I think it's a nice book, it has some great pictures.
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Oct 13, 2000
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On that infamous misquote, the caption was labeled: "Mrs. J.B. Ismay, Who survived the disaster". Well she did survivor the disaster! Okay, so she wasn't on the ship. Picky, picky, picky. ;)

In fairness to the author, it is possible that he was not responsible for the mistake. I don't think authors usually are the ones to make up the captions for the illustrations.

Overall, this book is one of the many generic books retelling the Titanic story available nowadays. It does a good job of covering the basics and is a pleasant afternoon read, plus it is attractively illustrated through-out. It would be most useful to someone who is just learning about the Titanic story, but people who know their Titanic history well will not find anything new here.

all the best, Michael (TheManInBlack) T
 
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Cornelius Thiessen

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Thanks for the responses folks
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And Dave, you're probably right, it would have been an easy error to make, I had no idea Mrs Ismay joined him on the leg of the return journey.

I also just finished reading "Titanic At 2 AM", my hat is off to Paul J. Quinn for what I think is a very accurate depiction of the liners last minutes.
 
Mar 18, 2000
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Paul Quinn's book, Titanic at 2 AM, is a very good one.

His other, Dusk to Dawn, is also excellent, and well worth the buy
 
Jun 4, 2000
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Cornelius, I've added to the thread's title to help others find this discussion. While Peter Thresh's Titanic has been mentioned in numerous other threads, it's not had its own dedicated discussion before.
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Per Michael T's comments, I know many historians / biographers and other writers of non fiction who did not caption illustrations in their books and lived to regret it. However, there should be the opportunity for the originating author to proof all additional material, so it's hard to know who is at fault in this instance.

As so many have pointed out, Mrs JB Ismay did indeed survive the disaster. ;)
 

Inger Sheil

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As I've cheerfully pointed out, I also survived the disaster. So did Lloyd George and Winston Churchill
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I'll have to haul it out again, but I remember there were some outrageous clangers in the Thresh book - confusing Hemming and Moody, for example! And not just in a brief reference, either - IIRC, Thresh made quite a point of relating how Moody helped Lightoller, even stepping out of a boat when Lightoller said he needed someone to hlep with the after fall. The near-obligatory error with the Olympic officers mislabelled as Titanic officers was also in there.
 

Michael lowe

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Apr 2, 2006
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This is not about this book here but, a lot of books about Titanic are very innacurate, for example,: one book that i red said: " Titanic was the biggest and fastest ship at her time" spot the innacuracey?? Mauratania was the fastest ship at that time ......... if anybody reading this is going to write a book about Titanic, please make sure that your facts are correct. Thank-you



Take her to sea Mr Murdoch-Let's stretch her legs
 
Feb 24, 2004
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And Michael, Titanic would have retained its title of "biggest" for only about one more year, had it not sunk. Then, once again, the Olympic became the largest. And the Norddeutscher Lloyd Line's Imperator, already under construction when Titanic went down, entered service in June, 1913. 52,117 gross tons, 919 feet long, speed: 23 knots. After WWI, the US used it as a troop transport, and it finally went to Cunard and became the RMS Berengaria.
 
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