Anyone want a dub of a Dallas Titanic exhibit news special


Feb 14, 2011
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In 2000 there was a nice tv special done by a local Dallas network, that was all about the Titanic exhibit, then at Fair Park in Dallas.

Nice exhibit- my last one, and 2nd favorite.

Part one is an interview with Titanic sub diver Ralph White,which was done near the wreck model (he dove on Titanic nearlly 40 times), and the 2nd half was a sit down interview with me, in a tv studio somewhere...
I just thought there might be some Texans, or other folks who would want a copy for thier Titanic collection....Ill gladly make dupes at some point...

Regards



Tarn Stephanos
 
Nov 26, 2005
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You got to meet Ralph White? That's gotta be cool as can be! Talking with someone who's been to the Titanic 40+ times. Are you a journalist, newscaster? Sounds really cool!
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Ralph is a funny guy..quite a character, and he has had such an amazing life. The places he's been, the people he met...He needs to write his autobio sometime...
I worked at the exhibits, it was a blast....Dallas was especially great, becuse we had a good staff of hardcore Titanic buffs...
By 2ooo SFX used me as press liason so I was doing the tv and radio spots plugging the Titanic exhibits.
But I thought Ralph White's interview on the special was quite good.
...ah, those were the days...



regards


Tarn Stephanos
 
Nov 26, 2005
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Oh now that's not fair! lol. I went to the Dallas exhibit TWICE. I didn't know that I could have become staff for the exhibit. Damn! lol. I could've at least tried to anyway. That's so awesome that you've gotten to do the things you've done. I was an extra in JC's Titanic but that's as far as my other life *Titanic* goes. I would love to be part of the exhibits or even the expeditions. (Those that don't go down there and destroy the wreck). Way cool! Keep in touch!

Matt.
 
Feb 14, 2011
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We were desperate to hire Titanic buffs for our floor crew in Dallas, you should have applied.....
Somehow I think being an extra in Cameron's Titanic film is far more impressive- you have become immortalized on film and saw the creation of the film from the inside..
Can you spot yourself on screen? How did you land the gig?

regards


Tarn Stephanos
 

Andrew Epps

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Feb 15, 2005
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If I remember correctly, the Dallas exhibit was the smaller of the the two that were travelling at the time and the bigger one was in Chicago at that time, Is that correct? If so, are the exhibits still configured like that or have they changed much over the last 5 years?
 
Nov 26, 2005
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Tarn...

Next time that thing comes through Dallas I am so there! lol. (applying). I'm only in one scene in Titanic when the ship is going down. I'll see if I can crop out a photo from the DVD and upload it here so you can see. I'm in a large croud (of course) at the end of the A-Deck promenade when the bridge goes under. I'll have to show ya. Actually I had a friend who had gotten a notice from the Titanic Historical Society and had booked a trip to Baja to see the set. He took me with him. We were touring the thing and spotted a member of the production crew and just walked up and asked if we could be extras. They had the set tilting and were filming the sinking scenes at this point. It was really cool being on a set that looked exactly like titanic and feeling it get steeper and steeper. Really overwhelming.
 
Nov 26, 2005
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Hey Tarn,

Have you heard anything about there maybe another exhibit coming to Dallas? I haven't heard anything, but I was hoping you might be in the loop or something.
happy.gif
BTW, do you live in Dallas? I'm in Denton, TX myself. Just wondering.

Matt.
 

Hilda Jaschke

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Apr 22, 2003
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I went to the same exhibit in Dallas too and it was amazing! When it came back around to Houston I had a family crisis and could not attend(sadly),so I also am wondering if any of you know if it will make its way to Texas again?

I tried to lobby it here for San Antonio,but no avail!
I am dying to see it again!
 
May 3, 2005
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Sorry I missed the Titanic exhibit at Dallas.

I'm a member of the Dallas Historical Society in the Hall of State, just across the street from the Food and Fiber Building (I believe the Titanic exhibit was in that building...I think it would have been more impressive if they could have had the Titanic exhibit in The Hall of State.)

I have a message on the DHS Message Board as to whether there were any citizens of Dallas, their relatives or friends involved in the Titanic disaster ? Have you come up with anything along those lines ?

-jnb -"The Ghost of John Neely Bryan"
(I live in Irving)
 
May 12, 2005
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Robert:

I tried greeting you offline but never received a reply.

To answer your question, if I may, there were no residents of Dallas aboard Titanic, but relatives of some survivors later settled there. Today, relatives of Spencer Silverthorne, including his great niece, live in Dallas, family members of Martha (Mrs. Walter B.) Stephenson live in Richardson, and descendents of August Wennerstrom also live in Dallas County. Titanic aficionados will recognize the Silverthorne and Stephenson names from Walter Lord’s A Night to Remember. I met Mr. Silverthorne’s niece at the Titanic Texas get-together in 2003; her mother lives in Salado. It was great to hear their memories of Spencer who seems to have been a quiet, modest man, who did his best to stay out of the spotlight, despite his memorable appearance in Lord’s book.

There were only three Texans on Titanic, as you may know. The Samuel Risiens, substantial landowners from Groesbeck, Tx, who were unaccountably travelling third class, and Alfred Rowe, a wealthy Britisher who maintained a prosperous ranch in Clarendon, Tx, and founded the town of McLean. All three died in the sinking.

About a half dozen other Titanic survivors and their families settled in Texas after the disaster. Passenger researcher Phillip Gowan, who is from Corsicana, Tx, was kind enough to share his work with me for several articles I wrote for state newspapers over the last 3 years or so. Among these are "Lone Star Links to 1912 Tragedy" (Ennis Daily News, May 12, 2002), "A Titanic Connection in Ennis?" (EDN, Aug. 7, 2002), "Titanic Texans" (Navarro County Star, Nov. 6, 2003) and "Local Man Contributes to Titanic Documentary" (NCS, June 3, 2004).

The first article was regionally syndicated but I have no idea which other papers it appeared in, and the third one was used as the basis for stories by other newspapers, but again I don’t have info on those.

According to Gowan, survivors who later lived in Texas were Eleanor Cassebeer (Victoria, Tx), an elusive passenger whose tracks he was the first to uncover over 5 years ago, Bella Moore Trayzohn and her son Meyer (El Paso, Tx), Adele Nasser Shamalay (El Paso), Bridget O’Driscoll Carney (Houston, Tx) and Albert Edward Horswill (Humble, Tx).

Some of these survivors’ relatives still reside in the state.

Best wishes,
Randy
 
May 3, 2005
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Randy-

Thanks very much for all the information.

My apologies for not responding earlier, but either I overlooked your e-mail or it didn't go through. My belated thanks and appreciation for your efforts.

I have an idea that some of those who were fairly well off were traveling in Third Class.:
There were some stories about other passengers who would have normally traveled First Class who settled for Second Class on the Titanic due to being stranded on other ships due to the coal strike. Maybe it was a "trickle down effect" -First to Second; Second to Third ? However, according to some other posts on this website there wasn't really all that much difference in fares ?

Interesting bit about the other connections. The Devil's Rope Museum in Mc Lean , TX has some info on the Titanic connection. Also there is some discussion about whether Clarendon, TX was named for Lord Clarendon or Clara, the wife of the Methodist Minister who founded the town. Groesbeck is the last place I would have suspected for a Titanic passenger !

Also, another bit of nitpicking. I know "Titanic" (1953) is notorious for its errors of omission and commission. :But....Would it have been very likely for a member of the Tennis Team from Purdue U. to have been traveling First Class, much less seated at The Captain's Table ? (This probably really belongs in the movies threads under dramatic license.)


Best regards,
Robert
aka jnb- "The Ghost of John Neely Bryan"

"I live to serve !" - The Purser on "Titanic - Adventure Out Of Time "
 
May 12, 2005
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Hi, Robert:

Like you, I have heard about regular first class travelers settling for second, or second class passengers upgrading to first, but the Risiens’ story is unusual, if not unique. It hasn’t been proved but family rumor, according to Phil Gowan, who actually knew the Resiens’ descendants, was that Sam and Emma booked steerage tickets to avoid suspicion of their cache of diamonds from the mine they co-owned in S. Africa. So who knows? It’s an intriguing tale, though!

Interesting about the Devil’s Rope Museum. I had heard that there were items on display in the town that related to Alfred Rowe but I never knew the name of the museum.

It might interest you to know that in Ennis, Tx., my hometown, there is a recently restored site called the Rowe Building, believed to have been named for Alfred Rowe’s family, some of whom settled near here. It is a big turreted structure designed by architect Hix McCanless. Built in 1905, it now houses a boutique and tea-room. It’s quite a beautiful building standing in the center of town.

Yes, Groesbeck is an odd place to think of a Titanic passenger coming from! I hear there is material relating to the Risiens’ Titanic connection at the city’s library. Sad to say, I’ve never taken the time to go and see for myself. But I have visited the Risien cemetery plot in Corsicana, about 25 miles from my home, where it’s possible that a marker will one day be struck in memory of Sam and Emma. I think it would be a good idea to have some sort of a memorial there since the couple have no grave, at least not one on land….

As to the likelihood of a tennis team from Purdue being in first class and dining with the captain, I don’t think it’s so far-fetched, especially if they had made the news, or were from socially prominent families. As you know two tennis champs, the famous Karl Behr and Richard Norris Williams Jr., were actually on Titanic and both were in first class.

Best,
Randy
 
May 3, 2005
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Randy-

Thanks for the comments.

I was assuming that "Gifford Rogers" was not from "a prominent family" and was just traveling with the team. Of course, I am also assuming that "Gifford Rogers" was as much a fictional character as "Annette Sturges." Maybe the team got together and pooled their cash to get First Class Accommodations :) , or again for "dramatic license" maybe Purdue U. or some benefactor or alumni footed the bill. Captain Smith might have even taken notice of the team and invited them , or at least the "Rogers Boy" , to the table. So much for the "dramatic license."

I think Behr and Williams were well known "pro's" in 1912 rather than amateurs. Also I believe young Jack Thayer was also a tennis player, but he was traveling with his family.

Robert Wagner and I had a bit in common with "Titanic - 1953". We were both about the same age in 1953 - as a matter of fact we are still about the same age in 2005. :) I had been at sea , too, but not with the likes of Audrey Dalton. Sigh ! I never was much of a sailor, so you might say I was a bit "at sea" during my brief Naval career of 1951-1955. :)

Regards, and thanks again,

-Robert
 

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