Archive through July 6 2006


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Joe Russo

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Apr 10, 2006
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Did anyone mention "Adventures of the Queen" yet? That was the Queen Mary and they actually moved the cameras up and down to make the ship appear like she was at sea.
 

John Clifford

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Mar 30, 1997
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Was "Ship of Fools" (1965) filmed, at any time, aboard a ship, or was it all a Hollywood set shoot?
 

John Clifford

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Mar 30, 1997
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Never mind, I found the answer, at http://us.imdb.com. All scenes for the 1965 film were shot in studios.

Perhaps if a remake is ever made (imagine Billy Zane as "Denny" having a confrontation with Frances Fisher as Mrs. Treadwell, or Leo & Kate playing strained lovers "Jenny" & "David"), perhaps a few shots could be done on an ocean liner or merchant ship. The QM2 would be too extravagant to fill in for the "Vera".
 

Louis Denaro

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Jan 25, 2006
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I'm surprised that no one has brought up a movie I saw many years back called "Dodsworth". I remember the plot concerned some American tycoon who liked to travel in style during the 20s / 30s. I seem to remember a scene on the Aquitania shot in such a way that you can see Dodsworth having a conversation on the boatdeck and in the distance you can clearly see the foredeck repeatedly plunging up and down into heavy seas. With those tall ventilators providing a frame of reference; I'd guess the swells were upwards of 40 feet (although some may argue that this effect was a product of Aquitania's notoriously low profile forwards of the bridge). I also vaguely remember a great shot of the Rex at the end of the film; from a 3/4 quarter rear perspective, she looked especially impressive. Talk about capturing famous liner in action! I'm only sorry I don't remember more because I only joined the movie mid-flick but I remember thinking at the time that it was a very liner-friendly movie so who knows what details I'm leaving out in this post.
 
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Glenn Lappin

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I think Assault on a Queen with sinatra was full of Queen Mary footage. The gang tries to loot the QM by threatening the ship with a surplus Uboat. Looked like oceans 11 at sea sans one bottle less booze.
 
Jan 23, 2006
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Hello everyone. Do you know any webpage with a list of movies where famous liners played some important role? Except all about "Titanic" of course.
I know only following ones:
-QUEEN MARY - "The Adventure of Poseidon"
-QUEEN ELIZABETH (her shipwreck) - "The Man with the Golden Gun"
-ILE DE FRANCE - "The Last Voyage"
-FRANCE - "Gendarme in New York" (French)
-BATORY - "Wife for Australian" (Polish)
-STEFAN BATORY - "Passenger" (Polish)
-CAP ARCONA - "Titanic" (German from 1943)
-HANSEATIC - "SOS Britannic" (or something like this)

Do you know some movies with AQUITANIA, LEVIATHAN,NORMANDIE,UNITED STATES or Italian liners?

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally posted as a separate thread, has been moved to this pre-existing thread addressing the same subject. MAB]
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>NORMANDIE,
Les Cinq sous de Lavarede
Les perles de la Couronne
Paris-New York
Normandie: the Floating City
The Fifth Column

>BATORY
On The Waterfront

>INDEPENDENCE
Promises, Promises
 
Aug 29, 2000
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I watched the original Sabrina last night with Audrey Hepburn and Bogart and was surprised to see the French Line's Liberte prominently featured in the plotline, steaming up the Hudson looking snappier than I had remembered her.
 

Grant Carman

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Jun 19, 2006
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I was watching a show on WW2 in colour a couple of nights ago, and when they showed an aircraft carrier being towed up the Hudson, after being seriously damaged in the South Pacific, it showed the Normandie lying on her side after she burned. They actually mentioned her, and then showed another shot of her. From the view on the carrier, she didn't look that badly damaged.
 
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bob cook

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Not sure if this is the proper place to post, but while reading a biography of David O. Selznick many years ago (probably 30!), it stated that Alfred Hitchcock originally came to the United States to make a film called Titanic. If I remember correctly, they took some of the description from the script being developed, in which Hitchcock plans a camera shot showing the baker creating a massive cake, paying meticulous attention to decorating it even as the decks began to slope downward.
 
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