Archive through October 28 2001

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Traci Miller

Guest
I loved the book and liked the movie - I certainly didn't think it deserved the "turkey" rating it got from a lot of critics. The scene of the ship surfacing, whether practical/possible or not, was great!

Traci
 
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Catherine Ehlers

Guest
I've just watched "Raise the Titanic" myself. The premise, especially considering what we now know about the condition of the wreck, is rather farfetched. Even before the wreck was discovered, did they actually think the ship was in that good a shape? Without even a list on the surface, no less? I also was kind of disappointed in the underwater shots of the Titanic--it was so dark and I could hardly see anything. Maybe they just wanted to hint because at that time no one had any idea what the wreck looked like. But I will say that I loved that music. She looked so good coming up--even though it was unbelievable that she'd be so clean-looking! (I found myself thinking that with a little elbow grease, they might even be able to fire her up again!) The most touching moment to me, though, was when she was towed into New York harbor and was given the rousing welcome she would have gotten back in 1912. It was such a moment, I began to cry. Here was Titanic, making port at last, and getting the welcome she should have gotten and never did and still looking beautiful.

Just wondering--if the bow section of the Titanic were somehow raised (we won't even talk about raising the stern)and was brought to New York harbor--what kind of welcome do you think she should have? I know it's impossible, but if it were possible, how should we welcome her?

After all, I believe a salute was given when the Big Piece was brought up!

Catherine Ehlers
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Catherine,

When I was studying Naval Architecture at the U.S. Naval Academy, my professor was tasked to develop a plausible scenario for raising the Titanic, for use by the production crew of a movie to be made from Cussler's book. I believe the year was 1977, but I could be off a year either way. When my prof mentioned it to the class, I volunteered to work on the project and ended up fabricating the hull forms that were used to observe sinking characteristics in the Academy's tow tanks.

I still have a copy of the final report of the study today. It's interesting to go back and read through the assumptions that were made, prior to the wreck being found. And yes, nobody had the slightest idea about the condition of the wreck, so the optimistic assumption was made that the hull was intact, sitting upright, structurally sound, etc...

What happened with the report? After all that effort, the movie production crew rejected it because our means of raising the hull were not cinematically dramatic enough. We recommended raising the ship horizontally and gradually in stages, with the ship not even breaking the surface until well into coastal waters. They were intent on having that bow shoot out of the water and having the ship floating on the surface for a while so that the Soviets could have a crack at it.

Don't hold out hope for the bow section being raised. The integrity of the bow is so compromised that even if the means were available to lift it, the bow section would never survive being separated from the ocean floor or the ascent to the surface.

Parks
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Parks- what year were you at USNA? Hubby was class of 72. Catherine, yes- the soundtrack was incredible and I would love to find it somewhere-John Barry who does the BEST stuff composed it.(Somewhere in Time is still my fav of his). Also loved that haunting tune played in the background when Pitt boards the T and walks around her diningroom looking pensive. I loved this film- even though some of the dialogue was silly-
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Salty Sam!! No Kidding! I'm impressed- hubby was 12th Co. Retired Old Capt. now- driving me crazy. I was a "townie"- -weekend Dalgren Hall hops paid off.(The Notre Dame nuns used to bus us down to go "mid fishing!" Now, to look in my Lucky Bag for you!
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Pinky and the Brain. Last place I would think to look for a parody of 'Raise the Titanic.' I'm home with my sick daughter this weekend, watching Nickelodeon. Brain needed some white crabs for his hypnotic pancakes, so he hijacks Nautile from the WHOI and raises the Titanic and brings her into New York (parks her right behind Acme Labs). And, just like the movie, the ship was intact and missing her second funnel. The ship broke in two when Brain lifted the wreck. That explains the mismatch between eyewitness testimony and the actual condition of the wreck. Obviously, in real life, Brain was not entirely successful.

Parks
 

Jordan Miner

Member
Jul 9, 2006
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Catherine, years before Titanic was discovered scientists stated that she would be sitting on the bottom looking just like she did the day she went down because of the depth of the water she was in. Boy, was I disappointed when they did find her...made me wonder what else these brilliant minds could be wrong about.

Jordan
 
Aug 6, 2001
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Hi everyone, I´ve just seen "Raise the Titanic" about three weeks ago, and what can I say? Iwon`t make critics to the movie it self, I`ll just say loved it and it was touching to see Titanic being raised and finnaly, after decades under the waves, setting sail to New York. I`ll just leave another word for John Barry`s music. Touching...
 
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Karen Sweigart

Guest
Hi Pedro, I just watched "Raise the Titanic" yesterday(caught about the last 1/2 hour, but taped the whole thing this morning). It did kind of bring a tear your eye when the Titanic came rising out of the water and they boarded and walked around the grand staircase. Of course that movie was made in 1980 when they didn't know the Titanic was in 2 pieces. Question for the technical people, could a ship(not the Titanic of course)be brought up in the way they did it in the movie?? It seemed unrealistic to me, but I'm not to knowledgable about these things. Thanks!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Karen- am no expert in flotation but the concept of attaching bags to the hull has worked in part with some measure of success in raising pieces of wreckage of planes and the Big Piece of Titanic's hull in the last salvage expedition. They are filled with, I believe if memory serves, gasoline.Of course the small section is a far cry from an entire ship. The 1996 expedition failed to raise the piece for several reasons, the cable parted (insufficient strength) when the piece was about 300 feet from the top- the seas had also gotten rougher- and some decking was still attached which added to the weight. The process outlined in Raise the T. was actually pretty sound and scientific. Parks- if you are out there- jump in here- I know you worked on this flotation principle!
 
Aug 6, 2001
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Hi Karen, hi Shelley! Yes, Shelley is right, but believe me, it`s impossible to raise the real Titanic. It would be immediatly destroyed if they tried to do something like that. As you know, both the two pieces are in very bad conditions. About the way they did it in the movie, I once saw in the National Geographic channel a submarine being rased that way. But again, I`m not very knowledgable about this!
Best regards,
Pedro
 
Aug 6, 2001
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Hi everyone, I know take this oportunity to ask if anyone knows about what happened to the model used in "Raise the Titanic" movie. can anyone help me with this? Thank you very much.
Best regards,
Pedro
 
Apr 11, 2001
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The last I heard, the model was sadly rusting away in Malta- abandoned in a field somewhere. Any update? There had been interest in bringing it to the US.
 
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Karen Sweigart

Guest
The model was very good I thought. It looked pretty realistic.
 

Dan Cherry

Active Member
Mar 3, 2000
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Somewhere in the internet are 10 year old pictures of the model. It looked pretty rough. Will look to see if they're still posted somewhere.