Are there any teachers out there

Jan 28, 2003
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I teach marketing and strategic management to undergrads and post-grads, so the opportunities for slipping the Titanic in are challenging. I have managed it in skills classes. I make them analyse the mortality and survival statistics by class and by (probable) position on the ship - it's not quite as straightforward as sometimes presented. But they find it more interesting than analyzing production output etc. And I've managed to drag it into discussions on organizational culture and communications! Increasingly though, these days, I find my ability to deliver my subjects "straight" hampered by a growing sense of unease about the ethics and structure of modern economies and industry.
However, I'm happy enough when I can shut the classroom door on College Management and Government audits etc. and just be with my students.
 
Jan 4, 2005
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I am currently a student teacher for 12th grade Problems of Democracy and later will be teaching the middle ages to 6th grade. Granted my area of study will permit me to teach History, Civics & Govt, Geography, Economics, Psychology, Anthropology, and Psychology - I'd ideally teach between the Reconstruction and WWII. Soon as I graduate this summer - am looking to move wherever, whether it be staying here in PA or leaving state... anyone know a good place looking for applications? :eek:)

Regards,
Eddie Petruskevich
http://westphalia101.tripod.com
 
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joy bono

Guest
I teach in an elementary school. Just wanted to inform my fellow teachers that there is a new book out that children will love. It is called The Stowaway on The Titanic. A fast, fun read. It has the most historical information that I have seen in a book for children. Although the Titanic story is one where there is hostilities between the classes, this story which is told from a multicultural perspective, uses children to demonstrate that it is possible for the classes to get along. I find it particularly helpful when teaching social studies because it addresses many of the standards and benchmarks.
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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Joy, how would you compare "Stowaway" with Barbara Williams' "Titanic Crossing"?
I thought the latter story had some good comments about the class struggle, especially as the character of Albert Trask hopes to get his mom to meet theatrical producer Harry Gordon (I'll admit that I read Henry Harris when I first read the book).
The book, IMO, is a must-read/study for the 4th and 5th graders. I have listed "Crossing" as recommended reading on the TITANIC BOOKS threads.
 
Jul 23, 2008
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Hi all

I teach in High School here in England. I've been teaching for eight years - though it feels more like eighty... Am waiting/praying for the day when our government realises that SATs are a load of rubbish and that league tables are divisive and destructive. Oh, and that the National Curriculum stifles any genuine passion for learning.

It also doesn't take any kind of genius to figure out that spending hours filling out forms is no substitute for inspiring young minds in the classroom with well planned, engaging lessons. If parents really knew what was going on, all that crap would be altered overnight. Sadly, in the 21st Century, head teachers have had to become masters of spin and so most parents are blissfully unaware of how tragic things are.

Other than that, I adore the profession.

It certainly has its moments.
 
Aug 10, 2002
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I've posted on ET a number of times in the past. However I'm a professor of Marine Transportation at Maine Maritime Academy. I teach a course NS 415 RMS Titanic. This course gives the various students a chance to bring knowledge they've gained in other courses in their major and apply it to the Titanic. This year I have 50 students in the course. In the winter spring of 2009 I hope to be able to offer the course as distance learning on line.
Regards,
Charlie Weeks
 

Mindy Deckard

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Aug 29, 2005
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I teach Middle school history. Unfortunately, as of this year though, I am no longer able to teach the Titanic as I am now teaching American history to 1860.
 

george bowes

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Feb 12, 2007
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I have taught Middle School for 30 years.Social Studies, Science, Special Education and Language Arts... including the Titanic as a section from history
 
Feb 14, 2011
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A thrilling day for me was back in 1998- I was giving a high school class a tour through the Boston Titanic exhibit, and imagine my surprise to see it was a young group from my old school, (Pentucket Regional high school, West Newbury MA, class of 1987), led by my favorite english teacher from high school, mrs Mary Datro . She recounted how even in high school I was obsessed with Titanic, and was happy to see i found a job that had a direct bearing to my obsession- Other teachers found my titanic obsession morbid and unhealthy- One teacher even suggested toi my parents that anyone interested in a ship where 1500 popele died needed psychiatric help- but mrs datro encouraged my interest- she knew it would encourage me to read, and engage in research, not tom foolery...
The funny thing was in the 80s i was the only known Titanic buff in my school- but 10 years later there were several...
That was a nice day- she was a teacher who inspired me- sadly she passed away from cancer a few years ago, but i'll never forget her....

It seems to me the best thing we can to is give students is the Gracie book- not only will it peak their interest in reading, but it will spark an intererest in history and research-
its encouraging that Titanic scholars are getting younger and younger- its fantasic that one of the most knowlegable, published titanic authors of our day is mark Chirnside- a chap in his early 20s. he brings to mind a lad named Michael who volunteered at the 2000 titanic exhibit in Dallas TX- he was 12, but had already devoured the gracie and Beesley books by the time he was 10, was a true rivet counter, and could give most Titanic buffs over 30 a run for their money.....,,,
 
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sashka pozzetti

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I think that it is a bit wierd that anyone would comment that it is morbid to be interested in the Titanic. If that was true, we wouldn't study two world wars in history lessons, or the Russian revolution, in such detail. The thing about the Titanic is we can all imagine going on a trip, staying in a Hotel, and being with lots of different people. I am sure one of the things we all think, is what would have happened to me if I was on board. Your teacher was right to encourage you. We all get obsessed by something at that age, and I can think of much worse things. A friend of mine was told not to become so obsessed with playing the trombone as he would never get a steady job. He is now in demand playing for Orchestras all over the world!!! He is not rich, but he is always working, and loves his job. What could be better!!?
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Hi Sashka
That was the point I often made- In my high school days it was a history teacher who felt my Titanic obsession was morbid- Yet he was an avid WW2 researcher-and was very interested the Holocoust- His double standards never ceased to amaze me....
 
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sashka pozzetti

Guest
Well, like you I had some excellent teachers who inspired and encouraged me, and some useless ones.I am thinking of a really unpleasant, and violent man, who was finally imprisoned a few years ago for abusing a child for several years. It is a shame that the teachers who were so quick to criticize those of us who were rule-breaking (the wrong style of clothing, or being 5 minutes late once) didn't take more notice of the warning signs about that teacher, like him shouting at parents, and throwing furniture. (all ignored, as ' he is just a bit old-fashioned) I would have used the word 'terrifying', but it did teach me not to put up with bullies!!!
 
Feb 14, 2011
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For any Titanic buff teachers here...how often do you have a student who has been bitten with the 'Titanic' bug? I would love to teach a class filled with titanic buffs- but odds are with kids being weaned on the internet, the younger Titanic buff students might know more about the great ship than Titanic buffs thrice their age...
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Hi Sashka- I never had any violent teachers- only judgemental ones. But some of them were very positive and supportive, like Mrs Datro. Some of my teachers were clueless- like the one who insisted that computers would never have a practical use in homes, outside of pure novelty....I did have one art teacher who liked to show us his collection of Nazi memorobillia....
He was known for dressing as Hitler every Halloween....
 
Feb 14, 2011
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In one high school class I wrote a reasearch paper on the Titanic, that I thought was really good- But my teacher failed the paper because there were 3 typos.....
 
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sashka pozzetti

Guest
My Mother was a teacher, and she used to say "the Beatles will never get anywhere" but she also had to keep the smile from her face when she was given answers to questions about an excerpt from 'Lord of the Rings' by someone who thought it was about boxing!!!

I expect the 3 typo failure teacher was best friends with the Nazi memorabilia guy!!! Good grief!!!
 

Kate Bortner

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May 17, 2001
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I rarely allow my students to write research papers on the Titanic. Mainly because I'll know if they fake it and that's an unfair disadvantage to them. But ask any of my students, they'll tell you I find many ways to bring the sinking into lesson plans. But forget all that now. . .it's summer time!!!
 

Lorna Spargo

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Aug 20, 2007
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I'm a stay-at-home mom now, although I have taught everything from Kindergarten to grade 12. Most recently, I taught junior high Language Arts for 4 yrs. I had my grade seven students do a theme on "The Sea". To teach them about research and essay writing, we worked together on a project, "The Titanic". After going through all of the steps and stages, they would chose topics of their own within the theme to research and write about.

One of the greatest gifts that I have learned over the years is that you can make any passion (within reason) that you have, fit just about any curriculum that you want it to fit, you just have to pick out the right points. Sometimes, its like being a contortionist, but it works!

I haven't taught in seven years (three kids 3, 5, 7) but I am raising a Titanic buff. I recently took my oldest (7) to Victoria, BC, Canada to see the Titanic exhibit. Poor kid backed into one of the display cases setting off the alarm. He was so embarrassed that the day was ruined for him. Looking back, though, he recalls it in a much more positive light.

He has been fascinated with the Titanic since he was three. He has probably forgotten more about the Titanic than I ever knew!
happy.gif
 
Feb 14, 2011
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I recently took a TEFL certification course (Teaching English as a foreign language), during which we had real russian students- I often made the Titanic the the theme of my lessons, with the grammar points and vocab being adjusted for the appropriate level...